Tag: Tumblr

April 10, 2012 / / black

By Guest Contributors Kendra James and Jordan St. John

It was a rough few days last month for The Vampire Diaries executive producer Julie Plec and actor Matt Davis, and probably rougher still for actress Kat Graham, who plays Bonnie Bennett. Starting with Davis’ dismissive response concerning a recently deceased fan after her battle with cancer, the day only got worse when Plec got into it with a fan after being asked why the writers can’t give Bonnie a love interest who isn’t her step-brother.

Adressing her comments to “certain Bonnie fans,” Plec responded on Twitter:

Fandom never takes well to being talked down to by creators and, while this was bad enough, Davis insisted on having the last word, via his own Twitter. Picture Plec as Elena, and Davis as, well, Alaric … or any of the other men who consistently come rushing to her aid short of reason and with half a plan. The result was just about as successful as anything that would have played out on the show.

And then when it was speculated that Bonnie’s treatment on the show might stem from her status as a POC, Davis–once again half cocked–fired back:

Kat Graham is of Black and Jewish descent, as Davis so kindly reminded fans while completely missing the point of the argument. His wild insensitivity and ignorant–if not blatantly racist–comments prompted some fans to call for a boycott of watching the show’s March 22 episode live or through DVR recordings. Not to have the show cancelled, mind you, but to show through a dip in the ratings that the fans would not tolerate this sort of treatment from the show’s writers and actors.

With that in mind, your resident Racialicious TVD obsessees, Jordan and Kendra, sat down for a short chat on how this exchange colored our view of the episode and Bonnie Bennett.

Read the Post Why The Vampire Diaries’ Treatment of Bonnie Bennett–And Her Fans–Bites

March 27, 2012 / / black
Courtesy Los Angeles Times

By Arturo R. García

As you’ll recall, Nerdgasm Noire’s Roxie Moxie shared this column about the problematic reactions to the casting of Lenny Kravitz and Amandla Stenberg in the film adaptation of The Hunger Games, the opening chapter of which has gone on to post an opening weekend take of more than $155 million at the box office.

Here’s a sample of how some fans took the news that Kravitz would be playing Cinna:

That was five months ago. In the wake of the film’s strong opening, the disappointment–and sometimes outright anger–of more fans has been pushed further into the spotlight.
Read the Post Update: Racist Hunger Games Fans Are Still Racist

March 7, 2012 / / WTF?
February 1, 2012 / / art
January 19, 2012 / / black

By Guest Contributor Kendra James

The bias in reporting the stories of missing children and people of color is nothing new. The names Elizabeth Smart, Shondra Levey, Kaley Anthony, Adam Walsh, Jaycee Dugard, and even the Lindbergh Baby roll off my tongue easily, but how many Pam Butlers, Hassani Campbells, or Jakadrien Turners can I name?

Two weeks ago on The Today Show, Ann Curry sat with the mother and sister of George Smith, a white Connecticut man who vanished on a cruise during his honeymoon in 2005. The same morning, I was following the story of Jakadrien, the 15-year-old runaway from Texas who went missing for eight months, before being found recently in the country of Colombia where she had been mistakenly deported.

After being featured on Today, Smith’s story was covered by Dateline NBC that evening. Turner’s, I read about on Tumblr and, later, Gawker. A search for the girl’s name that day revealed no articles on the New York Times website, and nothing on the Today Show site. Maybe the saddest part about that is my Tumblr dashboard regularly features pictures, signs, and descriptions for missing children of color who aren’t getting any attention at all aside from a few thousand reblogs via the site’s social justice blogs.

It’s thanks to TVOne’s new news magazine show, Find Our Missing, that I can add Campbell and Butler to my list.
Read the Post Find Our Missing Shines A Media Spotlight Where It’s Sorely Needed

January 4, 2012 / / announcements
December 3, 2010 / / activism

By Arturo R. García

Unlike other tumblr pages, Microaggressions isn’t laid out so that you have to scroll down to go from post to post; the multitude of mini-anecdotes is arranged side-to-side, like a community bulletin board:

“You speak so well. You don’t sound like other black girls.”
– when: almost every week since I started high school

In less than a week, the site has already amassed more than 200 contributors, with stories touching on issues from racism to size discrimination to stereotyping to sexism and beyond.

Read the Post More Than A Meme: Microaggressions offers a safe space for sharing short, painful stories