Tag Archives: Trayvon Martin

Beyond Trayvon Martin: Calls For Justice Surface For Other Senseless Deaths

By Arturo R. García

It’s been just over a month now since Trayvon Martin was shot and killed, and while his case has come to dominate national headlines, there have been other tragedies coming to light.
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‘The Ring Was The Only Place I Felt Safe’

By Guest Contributor Theresa Runstedtler, cross-posted from her blog

In reflecting on his tumultuous life and storied career, boxing great Sugar Ray Leonard recently told Guardian reporter Donald McRae, “I went through real darkness but the ring was my light. That was the one place I felt safe. I could control what happened in the ring. My heart turned icy” (my emphasis added). In his new autobiography, The Big Fight: My Story, Leonard reveals a painful past hidden behind the headlines of his historic ring victories–one of sexual abuse, a sense of rejection, and struggles with substance abuse.

What does it mean that Sugar Ray had to find safety in the violent confines of the boxing ring? What does it mean that he could only really feel empowered and free when fighting other men? McRae notes that back in the 1980s British boxing writer Hugh McIlvanney “spoke vividly of the hard chip of ice that Leonard stored in his fighting heart.” It seemed as if “Sugar Ray must have endured terrible darkness to fight with such chilling brilliance.” The turmoil of Leonard’s life outside the ring made his career in the ring a matter of financial and spiritual survival.

Yet Sugar Ray’s autobiography is much more than just a personal, singular story. His haunting revelations expose much about the racist society he lived in, and how little that society valued young black men like him in any other setting than the squared circle.

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Trayvon Martin Reaches The Sports Pages–And Online Hoaxes

By Arturo R. García

As the Trayvon Martin case continued to reverberate around the country’s consciousness this past weekend, the calls for justice reached the sports realm, as well.
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IMAGES: The Million Hoodie March

Compiled by Arturo R. García

Mother Jones’ assertion that Wednesday’s Million Hoodie March for Trayvon Martin and the Occupy Wall Street movement are “linked” will need to be reassessed in the days ahead. Though Occupation members like @OccupyTheHood were credited by some with helping the two groups find solidarity leading into the event, by Wednesday evening, allegations were made online accusing members of OWS of moving to co-opt it. (A compilation of some of the tweets in the debate can be found here.)

But one more thing should be reevaluated from that video, too: the notion that “hundreds” took part. People on the ground, as well as some online outlets, reported that thousands lined the streets, among them Martin’s parents.
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TODAY: Peace March for Trayvon Martin in Florida

Just received this press release.

On Wednesday, March 21, 2012 at 5 p.m. a Peace March will be held in support of the family of Trayvon Martin concerning their continuous efforts in seeking justice by having their son’s murderer prosecuted. We will assemble at Sherdavia Jenkins Peace Park in Liberty City (Corner of NW 62nd Street and NW 12th Avenue). We are calling all to stand up and let our voice be heard. Special invited guests include the family of Trayvon Martin, as well as the families of other young men who were taken from us way too soon.
Trayvon Martin, a Miami Gardens teenager was shot down in Sanford, FL while visiting his father. The police know that George Zimmerman is the shooter, but at this point have not taken any action.

Who: Concerned Citizens of Liberty City and Miami at Large
What: Peace March
When: Wednesday March 21, 2012 @ 5 pm
Where: Beginning at Sherdavia Jenkins Peace Park {Corner of NW 62 Street & NW 12 Avenue}
Why: Rally behind our murdered son Trayvon Martin’s family as they attempt to have his killer prosecuted. This is call to action is for citizens to voice concern about the violence in our communities that goes unaddressed. To put an end to this, WE NEED YOU NOW!
Contact: Joshua Jones (joshuajones83@gmail.com /(404)446-5649

UPDATE 5:12 pm EST: A march has also begun in Miami, FL, at Sherdavia Jenkins Peace Park, NW 62nd Street and NW 12th Avenue.

The Devaluation Of Black Life

By Guest Contributor Shanelle Matthews, cross-posted from Reproductive Justice

The deaths of Emmett Till, Sean Bell, Oscar Grant and Trayvon Martin counter the narrative that all human life is valuable.

As the news of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin’s murder floods the airwaves I sit, familiarly reflective and saddened by the loss of yet another Black life at the hands of a sanctimonious racist. But like many of you, I know that this experience is not an isolated one. Largely, the lives of young Black men have never held great value in this country. From birth to untimely death, they’ve been treated as mules for labor, obvious scapegoats, easy targets and disposable–at no consequence to the disposer.

We’ve watched as the media and policy makers have heavily overlooked the outright assassinations of countless Black boys and men with little to no significance placed on the value of their lives or the racial implications of why they were murdered.

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Announcement/Open Thread: The Million Hoodie March

In the spirit of solidarity, we want to join other sites in inviting our readers in the New York area to join in what’s being billed as the Million Hoodie March in honor of Trayvon Martin, scheduled to begin at Union Square at 6 p.m. EST.

A petition on Change.org calling for the prosecution of the man who killed Trayvon, George Zimmerman, is nearing the 1-million signature mark. As noted on the event’s Facebook page, today is also the United Nations International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.

If you do attend, or are donning a hoodie for the event, please use this space to talk about your experiences today.

Voices: Justice For Trayvon Martin

By Arturo R. García

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

And now, the waiting begins. Again.

Once again, a young person of color is dead, and hundreds of thousands of people are hoping for justice to be served. Less than a year ago, it was Troy Davis. This week, it’s Trayvon Martin, the 17-year-old Florida boy shot and killed by George Zimmerman, who remains free after authorities were criticized for allegedly protecting Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch aptain.

Tuesday night, the U.S. Justice Department announced it would investigate the slaying of Martin. And, especially in light of what we’ve learned about not only Zimmerman, but the social climate around him that enabled him to not only feel justified in an abhorrent sense of paranoia toward young black men, but to continue walking the streets after bringing about the worst possible outcome of that entitlement, the question comes to mind again: Will they get it right this time?
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