Tag: Sundance Film Festival

February 1, 2016 / / film

Ball gives life.

Explosive energy, fierce fashion, and a strict, family focused culture all hallmarks of the ballroom social scene.

Featuring the lives of Chi Chi Mizrahi, Christopher Waldorf, Divo Pink Lady, Gia Marie Love, Izana “Zariya” Vidal , Kenneth “Symba McQueen” Soler-Rios and co-written by Twiggy Pucci Garçon, KIKI is a joyous and energetic look at the next generation of unwavering LGBTQ self advocacy in the face of a hostile world. The artist’s description of the film is full of affirmations and vision statements, revealing the core idea underlying the documentary:

In this film collaboration between Kiki gatekeeper, Twiggy Pucci Garçon, and Swedish filmmaker Sara Jordenö, viewers are granted exclusive access into this high-stakes world, where fierce Ballroom competitions serve as a gateway into conversations surrounding Black- and Trans- Lives Matter movements. This new generation of Ballroom youth use the motto, “Not About Us Without Us,” and KIKI in kind has been made with extensive support and trust from the community, including an exhilarating score by renowned Ballroom and Voguing Producer Collective Qween Beat. Twiggy and Sara’s insider-outsider approach to their stories breathes fresh life into the representation of a marginalized community who demand visibility and real political power.

Read the Post Sundance Pick: KIKI

February 9, 2012 / / film
February 8, 2012 / / african-american
February 7, 2012 / / film

Walking in, I thought I had Filly Brown pegged. The trailer gave me the impression it was like every other hip-hop movie I’d ever seen:

  • Young kid from the hood trying to make good? Check.
  • Prerequisite positive rap song that feels like it was pulled from Ghostwriter? Check.
  • Street pressures that are easily overcome? Check.
  • Mandatory plot for women, involving sexing up your image to get signed to the majors? Check.

But hey, I had just gone through three really depressing movies about the fall out of the drug war. I needed something to lift my spirits, and I will shamelessly admit that I enjoyed Brown Sugar. On the real, Filly Brown could have been a Lifetime produced version of the Somaya Reece story, and I still would have watched it!

Luckily, I was wrong.

Okay, on second thought, I wasn’t that wrong. Two and a half of the four I listed above were in the movie. But the team behind Filly Brown managed to add enough new elements to make the standard tropes feel fresh. Read the Post Sundance Pick: Filly Brown

February 6, 2012 / / celebrities

Writing a good romantic comedy is tough.

Writing a good divorce comedy is tougher.

So the fact that Rashida Jones nailed both her performance and her part of the screenplay entire movie is something very special.

Celeste and Jesse Forever follows a long-term couple in the midst of a breakup. Having been best friends for the past twenty years, Celeste (Rashida Jones) and Jesse (Andy Samberg) find themselves divorcing–in spite of their continued chemistry. Celeste, a trends analyst and pop-culture commentator, is the epitome of a responsible business woman. Jesse is an unemployed artist, who spends more time scheming on surfing than actively planning out his life. They bond through some strange shared loves (like masturbating lip glosses, baby corn, and other things that look like tiny penises) but Celeste initiates the divorce since Jesse has failed to grow up. Read the Post Sundance Pick: Celeste and Jesse Forever

June 3, 2011 / / Culturelicious

By Arturo R. García

We got to do our do, not separate, together
Got to move on through, not separate, together
Got to do our do, not separate, together
Got to move on through, not separate, together
– A Tribe Called Quest, “Separate/Together,” 1996

Going by the trailer to an upcoming documentary, A Tribe Called Quest’s reunion earlier this decade put those lyrics to the test.

The highs and lows of that effort, as well as the group’s history, will be covered in Beats, Rhymes & Life: The Travels Of A Tribe Called Quest, which received critical praise when it premiered this past January at the Sundance Film Festival.

Directed by actor Michael Rapaport, Beats, Rhymes & Life will include not only performance footage and interviews with members Q-Tip, Phife Dawg, Jarobi White and Ali Shaheed Muhammad, but it looks like we’ll get to see how a feud between Phife and Q-Tip threatened to implode the group even as it returned to prominence.

“Is A Tribe Called Quest gonna make more music?” Rapaport asks Ali at one point. Ali’s response: “You got the answer to that question?”

Click here for a list of theatres that will show the film after it opens in July. The trailer, courtesy of Yahoo and Slashfilm, is under the cut.
Read the Post Can They Kick It (Again)?: A Tribe Called Quest Hits The Big Screen