Tag Archives: Shonda Rhimes

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Open Thread: Shonda Rhimes says ‘A Hashtag Is Not Helping’

By Arturo R. García

Considering that at least part of her success has been buoyed by Twitter, Scandal showrunner Shonda Rhimes’ apparent views on Twitter seem somewhat dismissive.

During her commencement address at Dartmouth University, Rhimes encouraged students to “pay it forward” with their education, including this bit of advice:

Find a cause you love. It’s OK to pick just one. You are going to need to spend a lot of time out in the real world trying to figure out how to stop feeling like a lost loser, so one cause is good. Devote some time every week to it.

Oh. And while we are discussing this, let me say a thing. A hashtag is not helping. #yesallwomen #takebackthenight #notallmen #bringbackourgirls #StopPretendingHashtagsAreTheSameAsDoingSomething

Hashtags are very pretty on Twitter. I love them. I will hashtag myself into next week. But a hashtag is not a movement. A hashtag does not make you Dr. King. A hashtag does not change anything. It’s a hashtag. It’s you, sitting on your butt, typing on your computer and then going back to binge-watching your favorite show. I do it all the time. For me, it’s Game of Thrones.

Volunteer some hours. Focus on something outside yourself. Devote a slice of your energies towards making the world suck less every week. Some people suggest doing this will increase your sense of well-being. Some say it’s good karma. I say that it will allow you to remember that, whether you are a legacy or the first in your family to go to college, the air you are breathing right now is rare air. Appreciate it. Don’t be an as*hole.

Rhimes is incorrect on at least one of these examples: Take Back The Night did not begin as a hashtag. That particular campaign against domestic violence can be traced back to the 1970s, and has always included in-person vigils and marches. So for her to say it is just a hashtag doesn’t square at all with reality.

But it’s also fair to point out that a href=”http://time.com/114043/yesallwomen-hashtag-santa-barbara-shooting/” target=”_blank”>#YesAllWomen and #NotAllMen emerged as vital conversation points in the wake of the shooting and stabbing attacks in Isla Vista, California. They also served as points of connection for people who might not be willing to open up in a “public” setting, allowing them to share their stories as they saw fit. That doesn’t make them “Dr. King,” but the idea of online safe spaces shouldn’t be treated as invalid, either.

Likewise, #BringBackOurGirls did the same for the mass kidnappings perpetrated by Boko Haram in Nigeria, and the pressure upon the government to respond.

So in those instances, it can be argued that the tags did help, because they alerted people to the problems at hand in ways that larger media outlets were not able or willing to do. And in the case of #BringBackOurGirls in particular, the tag was a visible part of the first demonstrations associated with it in Nigeria, let alone the ones that followed around the world. In other words, seeing the tag led people to do just what Rhimes is calling for.

Moreover, what if a person has no outlets — or at least, no safe ones — within their communities? What if a person is not physically or emotionally able to put themselves in the middle of events that are typically crowded, loud and, in a worst-case scenario, potentially dangerous?

Lastly, it cannot be forgotten that Scandal, in particular, has not only survived, but thrived in part thanks to being able to generate such heated online conversation and live-tweeting. As Think Progress reported last year, data has emerged showing that people “sitting on their butt” can have quantifiable — and thus, money-making — influence on a show:

Specifically, the study found that for 18-34 year olds, an 8.5% increase in Twitter volume corresponds to a 1% increase in TV ratings for premiere episodes, and a 4.2% increase in Twitter volume corresponds with a 1% increase in ratings for midseason episodes. Additionally, a 14.0% increase in Twitter volume is associated with a 1% increase in TV program ratings for 35-49 year olds, reflecting a stronger relationship between Twitter and TV for younger audiences.

Further, the study found that the correlation between Tweets and TV ratings strengthens for midseason episodes for both age groups. An increase in Twitter volume of 4.2% and 8.4% is associated with a 1% increase in ratings for 18-34 year olds and 35-49 year olds, respectively. Moreover, by midseason Twitter was responsible for more of the variance in ratings for 18-34 year olds than advertising spend.

So what do you think, Racializens? Was Rhimes off-base?

Who Will Be Scandal’s Next Harrison? Eight Actors and Actresses Who Could Don the Suspenders

By Guest Contributor Monique Jones

Image via ABC.com

Columbus Short confirmed that he had been fired from ABC’s hit show Scandal late April. His departure is a result being charged with misdemeanor spousal battery against his wife, Tuere Short. “At this time I must confirm my exit from a show I’ve called home for three years, with what is the most talented ensemble in television today,” Short said in a statement.

After thanking the show’s creator, Shonda Rhimes and the cast, Short said, “Everything must come to an end and unfortunately the time has come for Harrison Wright to exit the canvas.”

With the confirmation of his departure, it puts the show and fans at a crossroads—who will pick up where Harrison left off and become the next right hand to Olivia Pope?

It would seem that certain qualities are necessary in order to be a great second-in-command at Pope & Associates. Those qualities–an infinite amount of charm, cunning and the ability to play a little dirty–seemed to be what kept Harrison employed. So, with that in mind, I have list of eight actors and actresses (yes, actresses!) that could become the new Harrison. All of the actors meet the criteria of:

  1. Being either glamorous or alluring in some capacity, which the character could use as an assist to their charm technique
  2. Playing roles with a certain amount of intensity, and
  3. Are either available for new television roles or are on shows that could allow for a dual role on a different show (like if a show is shooting in the off-season or something). Let’s jump into it.

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Table For Three: Scandal 3.18, ‘The Price Of Free And Fair Election’

By Tope Fadiran Charlton, Arturo R. García and Kendra James

Olivia (Kerry Washington) and Rowan (Joe Morton) reconcile — for now?

After threatening to go out by blowing the president up, Scandal ended its third season by making him whimper, in an oddly melancholy episode that actually did seem to change everything for Olivia Pope and her associates — if not end them altogether.

Remember, the series has not been confirmed for renewal, even if signs suggest we’ll see a new season announced soon.

But do we even want to see the show return after a third season that was inconsistent at best? For this special edition, Arturo and Kendra were joined by friend of the blog Tope Fadiran Charlton, whose work can also be found at Are Women Human?

SPOILERS under the cut
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Open Thread: Scandal 3.17, “Flesh and Blood”

By Arturo R. García

We now pause to honor Eli’s (Joe Morton) BOSS entrance.

Finally, the chickens came home to roost on Scandal‘s penultimate episode of the season.

Unfortunately, they came for the writers.
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Open Thread: Scandal 3.16, ‘The Fluffer’

By Arturo R. García

Olivia (Kerry Washington) discovers that the “B” in “B613″ stands for “bootie call.”

For being a place-holder episode, “The Fluffer” did manage to pull on at least one intriguing plot thread before hurtling us headlong into the season’s Big Finish.
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Open Thread: Scandal 3.14, “Kiss Kiss Bang Bang”

By Arturo R. García

Olivia (Kerry Washington) finds herself — once again — paying the price for her own success.

The thing about requiem episodes is, they serve as a way for a show to reset itself while exploring how the characters doing so after a particularly noteworthy loss. In the case of Scandal, last week’s clearing of the decks also showed the show bumping up against its own self-imposed limits more visibly than usual.

SPOILERS UNDER THE CUT
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Open Thread: Scandal 3.12, ‘We Do Not Touch the First Ladies’

By Arturo R. García

Olivia (Kerry Washington) and Fitz (Tony Goldwyn) face yet another re-definition of their relationship.

This week’s episode was best served when it strayed from the usual tropes. Sure, we got Olivia and Fitz arguing (again) about the rules of their relationship, and starting the episode with them in flagante pugna about her deciding to “date” Jake — with him outside the door — at least made it a more interesting take on the Fight Of The Week.

But it wasn’t until Jake, and then Mellie, and then Huck, began questioning Olivia that the episode scored the most. SPOILERS UNDER THE CUT.
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Open Thread: Scandal 3.11, ‘Ride, Sally, Ride’

By Arturo R. García

Our own Kendra James will have a proper review Monday morning, but we figured we’d get the ball rolling and gather your first thoughts on the Scandal spring premiere. SPOILERS UNDER THE CUT

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