Tag Archives: Sex and the City 2

Searching for Our Decolonized Image: Nicki Minaj Puts the Other in The Other Woman

By Guest Contributor Rajul Punjabi

The trailer for The Other Woman, a flick about the unlikely blossoming friendship of three women (Cameron Diaz, Leslie Mann, and Kate Upton) while they conspire against their mutually shared cheating man (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau), was released last week. Nicki Minaj is in it too, and a plethora of entertainment outlets are ablaze with blurbs about her non-animated silver screen debut.

One of my favorite headlines reads, “Nicki Minaj Stars in The Other Woman.“ Fun, right Barbz? Finally, her formal theatrical training and the scintillating possibilities of Minaj channeling one of her alter egos on the silver screen. But, as the preview reveals, she’s hardly the star of the movie. She plays a “sassy, outspoken, legal assistant” to Cameron Diaz’s power lawyer. She’s not even the side chick. She is the side chick’s sidekick.
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Sex and the City, Just Wright, Gender Bonding, and RomCom Fantasy Worlds

by Latoya Peterson

“I mean, what did you think?”

My friend EJ asked me this as we were walking back to her car around 2:00 AM, having spent the last eight and a half hours on a Sex and the City themed bender.  She waited until we had separated from the larger group, knowing like I did that race and gender analysis would blow the moods of the other women.  I thought about my answer for a bit.  It struck me as hilarious that we were the type of women that Carrie and company would hate on if they met us . There was an episode where Miranda snarked on Steve’s new girlfriend for wearing cheap shoes and being from one of the bouroughs, instead of Manhattan proper – between the seven of us, we had all the wrong traits (including too many women of color and the “wrong” kind of white girls), rocked a mix of Benetton and knock off fashion, and went to the Cheesecake Factory for our big night out. Our dinner conversation revolved around friends, weddings, launching and starting businesses, and… Arizona SB1070 and racial profiling.* After the longest dinner ever, we trooped over to AMC Columbia to catch the movie.  Even at the last show that evening, the theater was still packed full of women.

While reading the criticism of SATC 2, I noticed quite a few comments asking do women of color even watch this stuff? The answer is emphatically yes.  When we took our sits, the crowd was multiracial and of varying sizes.  But I didn’t need to hit the theater to know that – the ads and give aways for SATC 2 were running on the urban radio stations and many sites for fashionistas of color were gearing up for the film.  One of my favorite spots, the Fashion Bomb, runs a contest around the launch of each movie and has women lining up to submit their best Carrie inspired fashions.

So, a better question to ask would be why so many women of color feel invested in a franchise that is dedicated to perpetuating stereotypes? Continue reading

What Tami Said can save you $8: My review of “Sex and the City 2″

by Guest Contributor Tami, originally published at What Tami Said

Sex and the City 2

[Maybe there are spoilers in this review. I don’t think so. Frankly, I think there is nothing I could possibly do to make the shitfest that is Sex and the City 2 worse.]

Allow me to save you $8. Here is the plot of Sex and the City 2: Four privileged white women take a break from relentlessly moaning about their privileged lives to go on an Orientalist fantasy excursion to Abu Dhabi, where they are each assigned a brown servant to wait on them as they maraud through the country, dressed like assholes, exoticizing people, mocking culture, flouting religious custom, rubbing yams on their bodies and, on occasion, because they are our heroines, “saving” the natives with their American liberation and largess.

SATC was always only about a certain type of woman, despite media attempts to make Carrie, Samantha, Miranda and Charlotte into everywomen. The series presented a fictionalized view of white, wealthy, female Manhattanites. But the friendships between the protagonists felt universal. And as cartoonish as the individual characters could be, I saw pieces of them in the women around me, if not in myself. When the show first debuted, I was single in the city myself:

When “Sex” debuted in 1998, I was single and 20-something in a big city and it was fun to watch single, carefree women, who lived in a bigger city with bigger apartments, cooler jobs, more money, better shoes and more sex with hotter guys. It was fun fantasy. Read more…

I got older. And so have the characters in SATC, but it occurs to me that the franchise’s male creators aren’t quite sure what to do with women over 40. And so they have taken four flawed but generally likable women and made them repugnant. Continue reading

Quoted: Wajahat Ali on “Sex and the City 2‘s stunning Muslim clichés”

Michael Patrick King’s exquisitely tone-deaf movie is cinematic Viagra for Western cultural imperialists who still ignorantly and inaccurately paint the entire Middle East (and Iran) as a Shangri La in desperate need of liberation from ignorant, backward natives. Historian Bernard Lewis, the 93-year-old Hall of Fame Orientalist and author of such nuanced gems as “The Arabs in History” and “Islam and the West,” would probably die of priapism if he saw this movie. It’s like the cinematic progeny of “Not Without My Daughter” and “Arabian Nights” with a makeover by Valentino. Forget the oppressed women of Abu Dhabi. Let’s buy more bling for the burqa!

Our four female cultural avatars, like imperialistic Barbies, milk Abu Dhabi for leisure and hedonism without making any discernible, concrete efforts to learn about her people and their daily lives. An exception is Miranda, whose IQ drops about 100 points as she dilutes the vast complexities of a diverse culture into sound bites like this: “‘Hanh Gee’ means ‘yes’ in Arabic!”

Only it doesn’t — it’s Hindi and Punjabi, which is spoken by South Asians. [...]

If our cultural ambassadors truly cared about saving Muslim women, they surely would try to help them during the film’s interminable two and half hour running time, no? Sadly, instead, these incredibly shallow mock-feminists can’t even bother to have one decent conversation with a Muslim woman, because they’re too immersed in picnics on the desert and singing Arab disco karaoke renditions of “I Am Woman.” In fact, Abu Dhabi is just peachy when it’s a fantasy land where they ride around in limos and get comped an extravagantly vulgar $22,000 hotel suite. However, only when that materialism is taken away do they worry, in only the most superficial way, about sexual hypocrisy and women’s oppression.

— From “Sex and the City 2′s” stunning Muslim clichés, published at Salon

(Thanks to Fatemeh and Elton for the tip!)