Tag Archives: san diego comic-con

SDCC 2012 Prologue: Racialicious Teams Up With The Slants!

By Arturo R. García

We’ll have our annual two-part San Diego Comic-Con preview starting on Monday, but we want to get the word out early about this special event:

That’s right, the R, in association with Racebending, Hyphen Magazine, Blacklava, and the AMP Music Festival, are proud to present The Slants as they hold a two-night stand at The Stage Bar in downtown San Diego, just four blocks away from all the SDCC hilarity. Both shows are free, but you have to be 21 or over to attend. Here’s the line-up for each show:

  • On Saturday July 14, the show kicks off at 7:30 p.m. with the band joined by local group Misc. Ailments and DJ Miss Dust
  • Sunday July 15, it’s the after-party party starting at 9 p.m. as the band returns, this time alongside not only DJ Miss Dust, but San Diego electro-popsters 321 Stereo and Oakland’s Johnny Hi-Fi.

Again, there’s no cover for either show, so if you’re in the area, stop on by and say hi. Hope to see you there!

Open Thread: Is It Time For A Geeks Of Color Convention?

By Arturo R. García

This is just an idea that’s been kicking around my head for a few days, but I’d like to get everyone’s early take on it. Let me begin by listing reasons a POC-centric geek gathering should happen:

  • Because we’ve already seen Geek Girl Con and and Bent-Con step up for communities typically marginalized or exploited by genre-related industries.
  • Because Christina Xu’s GGC wrap-up raises questions that still need to be addressed:

in an age when superstar rapper Nicki Minaj name-checks Street Fighter characters and streetwear brands team up with comic-book companies like Marvel and DC, who exactly is the geek referred to in GeekGirlCon? To be a geek, do you have to prefer filk over bounce? Is it a self-identification?

I ask these questions because I’m legitimately curious; if fandom is the uniting factor, then the increasingly diverse audiences for all of our favorite geek media (video games, sci-fi, comics, etc.) should be offered a place at conventions like GGC. If, in fact, geekdom here is actually defined by a set of social norms and practices (or the lack thereof) that just happens to coincide with fandom, then geek communities need to have some serious internal conversations and own up to that.

  • Because, while San Diego Comic-Con and other conventions featured race-positive programming this year, that still doesn’t make them safe spaces.
  • Because you can still say the same about any number of fandoms.
  • Because in spite of this fact, there’s still members of fandom – consumers, creators and executives alike – who still won’t own up to the fact that there’s geeks out there who react with hostility whenever somebody points out a problematic portrayal of race.
  • Because there’s got to be creators and aspiring creators of color out there who need a place in which to meet and network outside of the “general population.”
  • Because, while it was great to read about DC Comics getting called out on the carpet at SDCC with regards to gender issues, I shouldn’t have to doubt that raising the same questions about race would get half as much discussion outside of sites like this one or Racebending.
  • Because the Akira adaptation is still happening, proving Hollywood didn’t get the message about The Last Airbender.
  • Because this might be the best way left to get those same industry forces to listen to our concerns, in a place where we can set the terms of discussion.

Again, this is just a kernel of a concept right now, but … what do you think, Racializens? Would you be up for a full-scale gathering?

Watch The Racialicious/Racebending Panel From San Diego Comic-Con!

By Arturo R. García

Big thanks to our friends at Racebending for sharing this with us – it’s our panel from San Diego Comic-Con, “Diversity and Fandom 102: How You Can Make A Difference,” in its’ entirety. From left to right, our panelists were:

  • Racebending’s Michael Le served as moderator
  • Actor Dante Basco (Avatar: The Last Airbender)
  • Showrunner/writer Javier Grillo-Marxuach (The Middleman)
  • Author Malinda Lo (Huntress)
  • Professor Henry Jenkins from the University of Southern California (CivicPaths Project)
  • Phil Yu, from AngryAsianMan
  • And that’s yours truly at the far end in the tie, looking slightly flustered at being among such a group of sharp folks.

And don’t forget, if you’re in the NYC area this weekend, Latoya and Andrea will be hosting a meet-up Sunday, Oct. 16, at Jing Fong in Manhattan, at noon. Enjoy the vid!

The SDCC Files: Catching Up With Keith Knight

By Arturo R. García

Cartoonist Keith Knight had a busy time at this year’s San Diego Comic-Con: he was part of The Black Panel, hosted his own panel, Nappy Hour, and promoted his own work, Too Small To Fail, the latest collection of work from (th)ink, his one-shot cartoon published in alternative newspapers around the country.

Too Small breezes through a host of topics, sometimes with sensibility, as in the case of a series of informational posts about Black History Month, and other times slinging barbs at targets both political:

and social:

As a result, the compilation can go from funny to affecting to edifying within just a few pages, making it a good introduction to Knight’s work for those who can’t read it in their own local papers. Meanwhile, at Comic-Con, Knight has been using a similar rapid-fire strategy for “Nappy Hour,” which he brought back this year with a panel that included “Black Panel” host Michael Davis, Bad Azz Mofo head honcho David Walker, and writer/performer Pam Noles.

I caught up to Knight at the convention to talk about the panel, his memories of McDuffie, and his impressions on fandom and race. The clip and a full transcript are under the cut.

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The SDCC Files: In Memoriam – The Black Panel Pays Tribute To Dwayne McDuffie

By Arturo R. García

At one point during this year’s Black Panel, artist Denys Cowan said what maybe everybody in the room was thinking: “It’s strange being here without him.”

Though the trademark sardonic humor of host Michael Davis still emerged on occasion (“I guess this don’t happen at the White Panel,” he said when he experienced some tech difficulties) this time around, Davis led Cowan and the other panelists in sharing their memories of the late Dwayne McDuffie – not just as one of the men behind Milestone Media, or as a prolific comics and television writer, but as a friend, colleague, and more.

“Dwayne was my writing mentor, my best friend, he was the godfather to my kid,” said Matt Wayne, a frequent collaborator of McDuffie’s. “Milestone was the best time of my life.”
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S.D. Comic-Con News: The Dwayne McDuffie Tribute That Wasn’t

By Arturo R. García

The program for this year’s San Diego Comic-Con will include a group of tributes to famed comic-book and cartoon writer Dwayne McDuffie, who passed away earlier this year. But Matt Wayne’s tribute piece will not be included, and Wayne, a frequent collaborator of the Milestone Media co-founder, took to the internet to publish it instead.

Wayne posted his intended tribute piece on the forums of McDuffie’s website late last week, saying he wrote it after being approached by SDCC to do so, and McDuffie’s wife had “dubbed it ‘perfect.’” But, Wayne said he was asked to change it, an option he declined.

“I decided to just let it go.,” he wrote. “I’m worried that Dwayne is going to be the industry’s “proof” that we’re all post-racial and chummy, now that they can’t be embarrassed into hiring him anymore. And I don’t want to contribute to that absurd but inevitable narrative.”

SDCC marketing and public relations director David Glanzer confirmed that Wayne was asked to change his submission, not because of any specific content, but because it didn’t match the more celebratory tone of other tribute pieces written for the program.

Glanzer also said that in light of what happened with Wayne’s piece, the editorial process for the program will be “opened up” in the future.

Besides the tributes to McDuffie planned for the SDCC program, which is given to all attendees of the four-day convention, it has been announced that “The Black Panel,” scheduled for July 22 at 10 a.m. in Room 5AB, will celebrate the Milestone co-founder’s life, featuring his other partners in the company, Derrick Dingle, Denys Cowan, and Michael Davis.

A transcript of Wayne’s original tribute piece is under the cut.

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The Extra-Large Racialicious Guide To San Diego Comic-Con 2011, Part II

By Arturo R. García

If you saw Part I yesterday, you saw that the Black Panel, traditionally held on Saturdays, had made its’ way to the Friday morning line-up. Luckily, more panels have stepped up to fill the POC void on Saturday, and Sunday looks to be book-ended by some interesting stuff. Not that we’re too biased. The line-up is under the cut.
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The Extra-Large Racialicious Guide To San Diego Comic-Con 2011, Part I

By Arturo R. García

The San Diego Comic-Con’s growth shows no signs of slowing down, even before its’ host venue, the San Diego Convention Center, begins its’ own expansion. As things stand, however, you can expect virtually all of downtown San Diego to be awash in SDCC-related events of their own. With that in mind, this year’s guide will run in two installments, while also covering some of the extracurricular festivities and celeb sightings.

Case in point: if you’re a Whedonista getting into town before Preview Night on July 20, you should go see singer Jane Lui in a stage adaptation of TEH JOSS’ Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog. The show premieres July 17 and runs thru July 30 at the Tenth Avenue Theatre. Tickets are available here, and you can see Lui talk about her transition to acting here:

With that in mind, click under the cut for a look at the POC-centric stuff going on and around SDCC. Highlighted panels will include the full description from the SDCC program.
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