Tag Archives: race

Reverse Oppression: A Fad That Needs To End

By Guest Contributors Paul and Renee of Fangs for the Fantasy; originally published at Feministe

It’s not a new idea–we’ve certainly seen it raising its ugly head in media repeatedly, but it’s become popular again–the “flipped prejudice” fiction. Victoria Foyt’s racist Save The Pearls did it for race and we now have the homophobic versions: a Kickstarter for the book Out by Laura Preble and the film Love Is All You Need. I hate linking to them but they need to be seen. They both have the same premise: an all gay world that persecutes the straight minority.

So that’s more appropriating the issues we live with: our history, our suffering, and then shitting on it all by making us the perpetrators of the violations committed against us. How can they not see how offensive this is? How can they not see how offensive taking the severe bigotry thrown at us every day and throughout history–bigotry that has cost us so much and then making our oppressors the victims and us the attackers–is? This is appropriative. This is offensive. It’s disrespectful–and it’s outright bigoted.
Continue reading

Speaking: Kenyon College *Tonight*, Ohio State, Smith College

Slide from the talk, taken from the “Top of the World” music video.

I’m knee-deep into the Knight Fellowship (more on that in October) so I’ve been scarce around here lately. But I did want to post about some upcoming events, since I love meeting Racializens in the world.

TONIGHT, 7 PM
Kenyon College
Higley Hall
101 East Brooklyn St
Gambier, OH 43022

Presenting “From Rape Culture to Pop Culture” as part of their Take Back the Night Programming. After-chat at the Cozier Center.

This is a version of the talk I summarized in “Some Notes on Rape Culture.

October 4, 4 PM

Wexner Center for the Arts
Ohio State
1871 North High Street
Columbus, OH 43201

Panelist during the Pop Impact Symposium. Description here:

How do feminist, queer, and critical race theories “trickle down” into the creation of popular culture? Entertainment industry insiders discuss how their educational experiences and critical concepts are introduced and circulate in their work. Cultural critic and digital media consultant Latoya Peterson (Racialicious) and comedian and writer Angela V. Shelton (Frangela) talk with moderator Kimberly Springer from Ohio State’s Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

Cosponsored by Ohio State’s Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies with support from Arts & Humanities.

November 8

Smith College
Northampton, MA 01063

I’m the keynote speaker for Otelia Cromwell Day, and will presenting a talk and a workshop, loosely structured around the situation that led to the excellent Pearls and Cashmere campaign.

Keynote–Against Pearl Clutching: Rebels, Renegades, and Critical Resistance

A look at social rebellion and historical revision through the lens of pop culture. Pearls and Cashmere, campus racism, and the politics of exclusion will be discussed.

Workshop–Bridging the Gaps: Solidarity Beyond Clichés

This workshop will focus on reading, journaling, and partner exercises designed to explore the difficulties in creating broadly inclusive spaces and creating frameworks and language that will allow for the formation of lasting coalitions.

Nature, Nurture, And The Pro Athlete

By Guest Contributor Jason Eastman, originally published on Sociological Images

Race as biology has largely been discredited, yet beliefs about one race being biologically superior to another still seem to pervade one social arena: sports.  Claims that different races have genetic advantages to play particular sports persists both because individual athletic ability obviously has some basis in biology (even though that does not mean it is racial biology at play) and athletics appears to be one social arena where racial minorities succeed over whites in certain sports.

For example, according to the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports’ 2011 Racial and Gender Report Card on The National Football League, over 2/3 of players in the NFL are African American–far higher than the proportion of Blacks in the general population of the United States.  This report also shows that all other racial groups are under-represented in the NFL relative to their proportion in the general population, including Asians who make up only 2% of the players in the league.

These statistics compel many to assume that racial biology plays a large part in athletic success.  However, the 60 Minutes investigation “Football Island” debunks this assumption during a trip to the place where most of the Asian players in the NFL come from: American Samoa.   This small island is a US Territory in the Pacific and has a population small enough to seat comfortably in most professional football stadiums.  Yet the average Samoan child “is 56 times more likely to get into the NFL than any other kid in America.”

Continue reading

The Bourne Legacy And Manila’s Militaristic Mapping

By Guest Contributor Bryan Ziadie

I’ve heard a few friends’ opinions so far about The Bourne Legacy, the latest installment in the Bourne film franchise. The last set of sequences in the film got particular attention. Those scenes take place in Manila. It seems to be the case here in the Philippines that people, at least those I know, managed to stay immersed in the film up until that point. After this, a feeling of strange misrecognition of the landscape took over. This may be because what we’re shown through the camera work in the Manila scenes suggests a perception of the Philippines not unfamiliar to a militarized American pop-culture industry that’s easy to identify with it until you find that familiar spaces have become the focus of the camera’s lens.

Rooftop-Hopping

One thing that I’ve noticed about First World action sequences that take place in Third World settings is the position of the camera. You often find it hovering above, looking down on metal, shanty-town rooftops as protagonists run across, leaping from one roof to the next either in pursuit of, or escape from, the enemy. A couple examples that come to mind can be found in Edward Norton’s Incredible Hulk and, in Inception, the scene that takes place in Mombasa. I can’t actually remember the movie Quantum of Solace very well, but the video game features a shanty-town, rooftop-hopping stage.

(Don’t watch the whole video, it’s actually pretty boring)

But, to say on track, here’s an illustrative scene from Bourne.

(Watch the whole video. It’s actually pretty badass.)
Continue reading

Are All The Racists On The Right?

By Guest Contributor Jay Livingston; originally published at Sociological Images

About two weeks ago, Chris Hayes said, “It is undeniably the case that racist Americans are almost entirely in one political coalition and not the other.”

The case, it turns out, is very deniable.  Alex Tabarrok at Marginal Revolution denied it with data from the 2002 and 2008 General Social Survey (GSS).  He looked at three questions…

  • Favor laws against interracial marriage
  • Would vote for a Black for president
  • Blacks should not be pushy

…and concludes:

It is undeniable that some Americans are racist but racists split about evenly across the parties.

Hayes then tweeted a retraction.

End of story?

Continue reading

Somewhere Between Explores Transracial Adoption And Identity

TRAILER: Somewhere Between – A Feature Documentary from Linda Knowlton on Vimeo.

 

Check out the synopsis:

Four baby girls are born in China to families who are unable to keep them, largely because of China’s “One Child Policy.” Instead of being raised by their biological parents, the baby girls are raised in orphanages, and then eventually adopted by American families to be whisked halfway around the world to the United States. There, they grow up with Sesame Street, hip-hop, and Twitter. They describe themselves as “bananas”: white on the inside and yellow on the outside. All is well, until they hit their teen years, when their pasts pull at them, and they begin to wonder, “Who am I?”

All four know they were probably “given up” because they were girls (they are understandably uncomfortable with the word “abandoned”), and grapple with issues of race, gender, and identity more acutely than most their age.

Documentaries have been made before about international adoption, but they have always been from the point of view of the adoptive, Caucasian parents, or the adult adoptee. Young women’s voices are rarely heard—especially young women of color. SOMEWHERE BETWEEN lets four teenaged girls—Fang, Haley, Ann, and Jenna—tell their own stories, letting the film unfold from their points of view and shedding light on their deepest thoughts: about their families, their feelings of being “other,” and their powerful connections to a past that most of them cannot recall.

The film captures nearly three years in the lives of these four dynamic young women.

The screening schedule is here.

On Our Radar: Upcoming Shows And Hollywood News

The Mindy Project is coming! The trailer is here:

So far, I am excited about the writing, and it’s great time slot (post-New Girl); not so excited about the default casting choices thus far. Mindy’s in yet another world where the main characters are white and the people of color are backgrounds, extra, or sassy moments of funny. Hopefully, Mindy makes that a part of the plot, instead of yet another oversight–but the Collider interview makes me think that isn’t going to happen. [Wetpaint, Collider]

I loved, loved, loved Gabrielle Union’s weed-smoking, video game-playing real estate agent in Think Like a Man, but she only had a few moments to shine. Now, she’s got a new show called Being Mary Jane, exploring a successful black television anchor with a less successful lovelife. Sounds promising, but this kind of show is all about the execution. [Shadow & Act, Ebony]

The CW is developing a series on Battle Royale. Yes, we already called Racebending. And they are not going in a direction that could get them banned from TV, which means we should all blow the dust off our DVDs. Also in the news set: Ringer is done, but Sarah Michelle Gellar is welcome to stay with the network. [Deadline Hollywood]

And: John Leguizamo is back with a new TV pilot called Only Fools and Horses. [Deadline] Chris Rock and Deshawn Raw team up for a sketch comedy series. [Shadow and Act] Nelsan Ellis (b.k.a. Lafayette from True Blood) is set to play MLK in Lee Daniels new film The Butler. [Deadline Hollywood] Women and Hollywood posted a great interview with Aurora Guerrero, the writer/director of Mosquita y Mari. [Women and Hollywood]

Remembering My Brown-Skinned Dolls

by Guest Contributor Daily Chicana, originally published at The Daily Chicana

Last night, I finished reading Junot Diaz’s The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, which I thoroughly enjoyed and highly recommend. The title character is an obese Dominican “ghetto nerd” obsessed with the “more speculative genres,” such as sci-fi, fantasy, and apocalyptic narratives. One element of the novel that I find I’m reflecting most on is Diaz’s suggestion that the history of rape, genocide, dictatorships and abuse of power that make up the central historical narrative of the Americas–with the island of Hispaniola, today’s Haiti and Dominican Republic, as ground zero of the creation of the New World–are just as fantastical as any speculative novel. In other words, Game of Thrones, Lord of the Rings, and the like have nothing on the true, gut-wrenching tales that emerge from Caribbean history and its resulting diaspora.

One quote in particular stood out to me: Oscar wonders aloud,

If we were orcs, wouldn’t we, at a racial level, imagine ourselves to look like elves? (178)

I love the moments like this where Oscar connects his beloved fantastical creatures to his everyday experience of race. I’m not actually into Lord of the Rings, btw; I never read Tolkien and only understand what Oscar’s talking about because my ex-husband forced me to see all three LOTR movies with him. So in case you don’t know an orc from an elf, Oscar is comparing the orcs, despised and hovering at the lower end of the hierarchy:

to the elite, golden elves, so genteel and immortal:

The question he poses is a sci-fi version of Toni Morrison’s Bluest Eye. It’s about the extreme impact, over time, that racial self-hatred has on one’s self-esteem and psyche. What happens to us when we never see positive representations of ourselves? Continue reading