Tag Archives: Precious

The Racialicious Guide To San Diego Comic-Con 2012, Part 2

SATURDAY
11:30 a.m.: Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained
As of Wednesday night there was some confusion as to whether Tarantino would be making it to this panel, but SDCC has advertised that the cast will be there, at least. Hall H.

12 p.m.: Shonen Jump Alpha
The weekly anime magazine brings in editor-in-chief Yoshihisa Heishi and others to talk about new titles and trends in the manga scene. Room 7AB.

1 p.m.: CBLDF: The Fight To Defend Manga
In 2010, Ryan Matheson was detained by Canadian customs and charged with importing child pornography after authorities went through the manga collection on his laptop. The charges against him were dropped after the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund took his case. Room 11AB.

1 p.m.: Northstar
Sure to be one of the more interesting panel offerings from Marvel, with the character getting married in the pages of Uncanny X-Men. And this is a great occasion, no doubt. Room 25ABC.

1:30 p.m.: 30th Anniversary of Love and Rockets
This 90-minute panel will give co-creators Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez, along with Fantagraphic Books co-publisher Gary Groth, more time to delve into the impact and the creative process behind their long-running indie classic. Room 24ABC.

2 p.m.: Spotlight on Morrie Turner
Nearly 50 years after its debut, Turner’s comic strip Wee Pals continues to be seen in more than 100 daily newspapers. Here Turner will share his story alongside host Keith Knight. Room 4.

5 p.m.: Comics of the African Diaspora
Focusing on “popular but obscure comic-book characters and creators,” the line-up here is interesting. Actress Robin Givens will moderate a panel consisting of Underworld co-creator Kevin Grevioux, Precious director Lee Daniels, Black Comix creator and co-author John Jennings, and Jennings’ collaborator Damian Duffy, who was his co-curator for Other Heroes: African American Comics Creators, Characters, and Archetypes, which began as an art exhibit at Jackson State University. Room 4.

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Brown Girls On Film: A Conversation With The Writers Of Farah Goes Bang

By Guest Contributor Neelanjana Banerjee

Soon-to-be-made indie film Farah Goes Bang, co-written by Laura Goode and Meera Menon, follows three friends in their twenties–one Persian, one Indian, and one white–who hit the road to campaign for John Kerry in 2004. One of them is also on a quest to lose her long-lingering virginity along the way. The writers describe the film as “a valentine to contemporary feminism, youth in revolt, and the passionate politics of idealism,” but most of all it represents the pair’s common “bottom line” in storytelling, one not very popular in mainstream media today: to represent women in art as women see themselves in life.

Despite their common interests, Meera and Laura hail from very different backgrounds and artistic points of view. A filmmaker born and raised in New Jersey, Meera is a first-generation Indian American of Malayali descent; her father, Vijayan Menon, is a prominent film producer in her family’s home state of Kerala. Laura, a novelist, poet, essayist, and dramatist of primarily Italian and Irish descent, grew up outside Minneapolis, MN; her 2011 young-adult novel Sister Mischief, examines, among other things, this white-dominated suburban setting.

Here they discuss their different approaches to representation and how the script for Farah Goes Bang tries to build bridges, and how you can help make this film a reality.
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Embracing Precious: The nuances and truths in the individual and collective stories we tell

by Guest Contributor Imani Perry, originally published at Afronetizen

Precious Poster

These are strange days indeed. We are firmly into the 21st century, and yet the 80s are haunting us. For African Americans it is yet again a decade of dream and deferral.

Back in the ‘80s, for the young Black and college educated, the doors of corporate America and other professions opened up and broadened the spectrum of the Black middle class like never before. But also, back in the ‘80s, crack cocaine and the aftermath of deindustrialization crippled areas of concentrated blackness in major urban centers.

Now in the 21st century, a new Black elite floods the popular imagination as Capitol Hill, the president and his administration become more and more colorful. But also now, in the 21st century, the recession hits Black communities hardest, and at the intersection of devastating rates of imprisonment, joblessness, and inadequate education lie a critical, hurting, mass of Black Americans.

Then came Precious.
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Open Thread: The Oscar Morning After

by Latoya PetersonOn Friday, I joined Alyssa Rosenberg on Bloggingheads.Tv, to chat about the Oscars, which is my least favorite subject. We covered stereotypes, the expectations of the academy, and how to determine what is “a best picture.” But last night had some interesting upsets.

Kathryn Bigelow took home the award for the Best Picture for The Hurt Locker. Thea points out “Much to the shock and delight of all my tweeps, Kathryn Bigelow was the first woman to win Best Director, the day before International Women’s Day no less. And for a movie that is actually pretty great; that among other things, provides an unadulterated shot at what it means to be the harbinger of Western, American imperialism against wholly humanised civilians (of colour).”

Sandra Bullock won for Best Actress in a Leading Role for The Blind Side. As was expected, Mo’Nique took home Best Supporting Actress for Precious.

Mo’nique’s backstage post-acceptance speech is also worth discussing. Explaining that her outfit is a tribute to Hattie McDaniel (the first African-American winner of an Oscar, for her supporting role in Gone with the Wind), she goes on to discuss her motivation in the role. She says: “This role was not about my acting career. This role has shaped my life. To allow me not to judge and to love unconditionally.”

And Avatar didn’t sweep the Oscars, but they still netted 3 awards.

Oh, and guess who else took home a statue?

Pixar’s Up floated away with Best Animated Picture and Best Original Score.

Your thoughts?

ETA: Deaf Indian Muslim Anarchist points out that missed another historic first: ‘Precious’ win: Geoffrey Fletcher first African American screenwriter to earn Academy Award

Quoted: Malika Saada Saar on the ‘Precious’ Ending That Should Have Been Shown


This movie is in many ways a fairy tale. The character Precious gets to be saved by a caring caseworker and a loving teacher. In real life, poor, undereducated and sexually victimized girls are most likely to end up in the juvenile justice system.

I see it all the time. There is the 13-year-old who became pregnant to stop her uncle from raping her — a girl whom I met not at an incest survivors group but in a girls’ detention facility. Or the girl raped so many times by age 13 that she feels worthy of being prostituted and cannot see a life for herself beyond jail. Or the girl who was kidnapped by a pimp, repeatedly raped by him, prostituted by him — only to be arrested and placed behind bars for prostitution.

Girls in the United States are subject to violence with horrifying frequency. One in three American girls will experience sexual violence by age 18, regardless of race or class. Girls ages 16 to 19 across the ethnic and economic spectrum are four times more likely than others to be victims of rape, attempted rape or sexual assault. No girl is safe from being raped, exploited or abused. Continue reading

Of Push, Precious, Percival, and “My Pafology”

by Latoya Peterson
erasure

The reality of popular culture was nothing new. The truth of the world landing on me daily, or hourly, was nothing I did not expect. But this book was a real slap in the face. It was like strolling through an antique mall, feeling good, liking the sunny day and then turning the corner to find a display of watermelon-eating, banjo-playing darkie carvings and a pyramid of Mammy cookie jars.

—Thelonious Monk Ellison (Percival Everett), Erasure

I knew that before I wrote a word on what I felt about Push and Precious, I was going to have a problem.  One, my personal experience colors a lot of my perception of the novel and the movie.  While Precious’ narrative is not close to mine (I’m way closer to Lola, from Oscar Wao) there were lots of notes of familiarity.

A few too many for comfort.

In discussions with the Racialicious crew, Thea and I actually got really close to parsing out why I feel so strongly about the work.

Thea wrote:

On the topic of African American lit…I am reading Don’t Erase Me right now by Carolyn Ferrell.

I guess it is supposed to be stories of black girls in the ghetto. The stories I’ve read so far are all about incest. So this trend is starting to bother me. Though I guess it could just be what I’m reading…

I wrote back:

It’s not really a trend if it happens a lot.

My sister and I were *not* molested by anyone growing up.  That made us a rarity.

Carmen pointed out that works that do feature incest and black people (like The Color Purple, The Bluest Eye) do tend to get critical acclaim and recognition, and wondered why that was. I  thought that the issue may be that white reviews, book publishers, etc, only know how to respond to black dysfunction, but that doesn’t erase the fact that so many of us go through this type of abuse.

Then Thea got all MFA on us, writing:

Just to clarify I didn’t mean that I thought sexual abuse was a trend. That would be a pretty awful thing to say. It’s more that I’m reading a deluge of books for an AfAm lit class that are about incest, or about black dysfunction in the inner city.

It’s distressing because while I don’t doubt for a second that this happens and that this is something that needs to be talked about and talked about until it stops happening, I am also quite sure that there is a lot more to being poor and black in the city than incest and family dysfunction. Continue reading

Kinatay

by Guest Contributor Tanglad, originally published at Tanglad

Let me get this out of the way first. This is not a movie review. It is a review of movie reviews about Brillante Mendoza’s Kinatay. Spoilers follow, though the title pretty much tells you what you’re gonna get.

Last weekend, Filipino director Brillante Mendoza won the best director award at the Cannes Festival for the movie Kinatay (”Slaughtered“). Mendoza’s win was a surprise, considering how Kinatay is probably, as Prometheus Brown puts it, the most hated film at Cannes.

Exerpts from Maggie Lee’s synopsis and review at The Hollywood Reporter:

Newly married Peping, who attends the police academy, receives an offer via text message to make a fast buck with a shady friend. By nightfall, he is in a van with a group of vicious gangsters who have kidnapped a bar hostess to demand a loan repayment under orders from an elusive general…

The real time pacing, feels like being stuck in a traffic jam, but the dramatic thrust is relentless as one hears through the muffled darkness, the woman being gagged and beaten mercilessly. The horror escalates to rape, murder and dismemberment. None of this is left to the imagination, with the men’s verbal sexism being equally distasteful.

That was a positive review. (See here to view Kinatay excerpts, and here for a round-up of reviews and more background on the film.)

Roger Ebert’s review, charmingly titled “What were they thinking of?”, is typical of how critics who hated Kinatay approached the movie. There is hardly any discussion of the merits of the movie itself, and instead a whole lot of indignation over the unpleasantness that viewers were subjected to:

It is Mendoza’s conceit that it his Idea will make a statement, or evoke a sensation, or demonstrate something–if only he makes the rest of the film as unpleasant to the eyes, the ears, the mind and the story itself as possible…

No drama is developed. No story purpose is revealed…

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