Tag Archives: New York Knicks

The Friday Mixtape – 6.15.12 Edition

Our first track this morning goes out to the sad, sad person behind this hoax:

Screencaps via Racialicious reader Lauren.

Last week, after Manny Pacquiao’s highly-suspect loss to Timothy Bradley, some goon pretended to tweet as Roger Mayweather, uncle and trainer for Pacquiao’s biggest rival (before Bradley, anyway) Floyd Mayweather, and trolled after seemingly anybody in sight, including New York Knicks player Jeremy Lin:

As it turns out, there’s either one really sad person or a number of them with the same stupid idea floating around. In short, whoever this is is a Hater. So, for whoever it is who somehow derives enjoyment from spewing digital diarrhea, Isabel Fay’s (NSFW) “Thank You Hater” is just for you:

We’re going back to the old-school for the next track, since you might not be able to hear it on the silver screen any time soon; according to Shadow & Act, while Outkast’s Andre 3000 may be working on a Jimi Hendrix biopic, the Hendrix estate is saying he’s doing so without its permission, meaning Hendrix’s music wouldn’t be cleared for use – which, given the subject, is a rather big obstacle.

Speaking of movies, the arrival of Ice-T’s documentary Something From Nothing: The Art Of Rap couldn’t come at a more interesting time, for reasons I’ll get into after watching it this weekend. As a primer for anybody going to see the film, how about a little Afrika Bambaataa & the Soul Sonic Force?

Next up, a meditative tune from the great Los Lobos: “Mariachi Suite,” one of their contributions to Robert Rodríguez’s Desperado from awhile back. Not that one ever needs a reason to listen to this group, but in this case, consider it a hint as to our Crush of the Week. Enjoy!

Let’s kick the tempo up again with this track from L.A.-based electro-pop group IAMMEDIC, which has a new album, Monster Monster, due out soon. Here’s one from their previous effort, Perfect, and though it gets a little NSFW-ish lyrically in the middle, “Spaceship” is pretty fun otherwise:

Wrapping us up this week is a pick inspired in part by the #vaginamovielines hashtag, which surged after Michigan state representative Lisa Brown was barred from speaking on the state House floor Thursday. Her crime? Telling state speaker James Bolger, “Finally Mr. Speaker, I’m flattered that you’re all so interested in my vagina, but ‘no’ means ‘no.’” According to Politico, she didn’t back down from her comments after Bolger’s overreaction:

“Maybe they are banning me because I dared say ‘vagina,’ the correct, medical name of a part of a woman’s anatomy these lawmakers are trying to regulate,” she said. “I’m outraged. I’m outraged that this legislative body not only wants to dictate what women can do, but what we can say.”

This kind of silencing was on Salt and Pepa’s mind just over two decades ago. Sad to see that time hasn’t helped Bolger get the message.

‘Chink In The Stands’: An Asian American Fan’s Notes

By Guest Contributor Jen Wang, cross-posted from Disgrasian

I sat down to write about the fallout that’s ensued since ESPN editor Anthony Federico wrote that “Chink In The Armor” headline a little over a week ago, and I ended up with a bunch of stories about myself. In some ways though, I think these notes better articulate my frustration and anger over many of the conversations that have taken place about Jeremy Lin with regard to race than explicit words to that effect would have. Or maybe I just really like talking about myself.

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For most of my life, I’ve been a sports fan. I was born and raised in Texas, so it was mandatory. More to the point, I was born and raised Chinese American in Texas. I couldn’t look like my peers, I couldn’t be accepted as an equal by many of my peers, but I could root for the same teams as my peers. And somewhere deep down, I probably figured that if I could demonstrate the same devotion to the idols of my peers, they would eventually come around to the idea that I wasn’t all that different from them, and perhaps even accept me as one of their own.

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My father arrived in College Station, Texas from Taiwan in 1965 on a student visa. He was one of several students from Taiwan who went to Texas A&M to pursue graduate degrees in the sciences that year. They all lived together. They all had nothing. Only two years before my dad began his studies at A&M, the school admitted its first African American students. My dad recalls that was right around the time the school shut down its campus chapter of the Ku Klux Klan. He and my mom met a few years later when she came over from Taiwan to attend a nearby women’s college. I have to think the cultural climate of small-town Texas was what put their relationship in fast-forward. They met one Thanksgiving when all of the American students from their schools were home with their families, married a year later, had my brother less than a year after that. My mother has stories from that time of being told to sit at the back of the bus; my father, who only had a bike in those first few years, used to get run off the road by other students in cars who thought it was funny to see a Chinaman in a ditch.

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Family Ties: On Jeremy Lin, “Tiger Moms,” And Tiger Woods

Courtesy Albany Times-Union

By Guest Contributor Dr. David J. Leonard

In a world that imagines basketball as the purview of African Americans, the emergence of Jeremy Lin has sent many commentators to speculate and theorize about Lin’s success. Focusing on religion, Eastern philosophy, his educational background, his intelligence, his parents, and his heritage, the dominant narrative has defined Lin’s success through the accepted “model minority” myth.

In other words, while celebrating Lin’s success as a challenge to dominant stereotypes regarding Asian Americans, the media has consistently invoked stereotypical representations of Asianness to explain his athletic success, as if his hard work, athleticism, and talents are not sufficient enough explanations.

Intentional or not, the story of Lin is both an effort to chronicle his own success in comforting and accepted terms and, in doing so, offer a commentary on blackness.

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Race Against The Machine: Jeremy Lin And The NBA’s Savior Myth

By Arturo R. García

In his own graceless way, Floyd Mayweather and his tasteless remarks about Jeremy Lin brought something new to light: maybe the best comparison point for the young New York Knicks guard isn’t Tim Tebow. Maybe it’s Larry Bird. With the link, however unpalatable, coming from tensions the NBA has tiptoed around for decades.

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MEMEWATCH: Adventures In Linsanity

As part of her column today, Sonita Moss sent us a batch of Jeremy Lin-inspired pictures. So many, in fact, that they threatened to overwhelm the actual piece.

But we thought, why let the images go to waste? So to supplement the ones she sent us, we decided to look up “Jeremy Lin” meme and see what popped up. The newest appears to be Linning, based off the bit from the picture on the right, where Lin and New York Knicks teammate Landry Fields cap off their Troy-and-Abed-like salute with a ritual donning of faux-glasses.

And like any good meme, it didn’t take long for it to spread, as you can see below in a pic taken in Australia:

Also, the pic above came from JeremyWin, which tends to feature Lin in action, but made time yesterday for some Va-LIN-tine cheer. Some of the others under the cut … well, they’re rooting for Lin, at least. How problematic are they? We’ll let you decide.
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Linvicible On The Court, Not To Realities Of Race

 

By Guest Contributor Sonita Moss

Racism is a funny thing – by funny I mean haha funny, as in, it’s funny when you’re not on the other end of it. In my experience, folks sometimes try to use their understanding of race to build bonds. Unfortunately, what comes across is race as a representation of difference that creates a chasm to be bridged through the awkward offering of stereotypes. As if snapping their fingers and saying ‘oh no he di-int’ in my face will endear them to me. From that statement alone, I’m sure you can guess my race. Such is life for people of color in America, however we want to deny it behind idealistic dreams of ‘post racial America’, race still matters, even for the model minority.

Jeremy Lin, the Taiwanese-American Harvard alum who is taking the world by storm as the new point guard for the New York Knicks, has not been shielded from everyday experiences that POCs face. In a candid NPR interview he gave back in 2010 whilst playing for Harvard’s basketball team, he shared the racial slurs that fans would toss at him: Go back to China; Chinese import;  Can you see the scoreboard?

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The God Squad: Tim Tebow, Jeremy Lin, And Religiosity Of Sports

By Guest Contributor Dr. David J. Leonard

Among the virtual saturation of Jeremy Lin online has been a poster of him with the words “We are all witnesses.” At Monday’s New York Knicks game, fans donned “black T-shirts that read “The Jeremy Lin Show” on the front” and “We Believe” painted on the back.

Encapsulating the hoopla and hype, while referencing the similar promise that LeBron James brought to Cleveland and the NBA (how’d that work out?), not to mention the spectacle of his meteoric rise, “the witness” iteration illustrates the religious overtones playing through the media coverage.

Since Lin emerged on the national scene while at Harvard, he has made his faith and religious identity quite clear. While refusing to abandon the “underdog” story, Cork Gaines focuses readers attention on his religious beliefs: “But there is more to Jeremy Lin than just being an undrafted Asian-American point guard out of Harvard. He is also a devout Christian that has previously declared that he plays for the glory of God and someday hopes to be a pastor.” Noting how post-game interviews often begin with Lin announcing his faith – “just very thankful to Jesus Christ, [his] Lord and savior” – Gaines uses this opportunity to deploy the often noted comparison that Jeremy Lin is the NBA’s Tim Tebow.

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