Tag Archives: New York City

NYPD2

Quoted: Police And Medical Teams During Eric Garner’s Last Moments

At one point, another officer is seen taking a cell phone and a pack of cigarettes from the 43-year-old Garner’s pants.

Even after the arrival of an EMT four minutes into the video, no medical aid is provided to Garner. He’s instead just loaded onto a stretcher and wheeled off.

Cops say he was pronounced dead a short time later after arriving at a Staten Island hospital.

NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo, caught on another video putting Garner in a chokehold, is shown standing a few feet away and chatting amiably with a uniformed colleague.

Near the end of the clip, he gives a satiric wave to the person shooting the second video.

Pantaleo, an eight-year veteran, was placed on modified duty Saturday as cops and the Staten Island district attorney investigated the case.

Pantaleo was stripped of his gun and his shield and assigned to work desk duty. The police union immediately denounced the move as “knee-jerk” and “completely unwarranted.”

New York Daily News

Image by Marcos Vasconcelos via Flickr Creative Commons

Harlem5

Harlem Residents: We Asked City for Help, We Got a Raid Instead

By Guest Contributor Daryl Khan, cross-posted from Juvenile Justice Information Exchange

Members of the NYPD raid the Manhattanville Houses and the Grant Houses in West Harlem early on the morning of June 4, 2014. A total of 40 suspects were arrested as part of a massive 145-count indictment of 103 people in a range of crimes, including murder, 19 shootings, gang assaults, beatings and conspiracy. Police apprehend a suspect outside the Grant Houses. All images by Robert Stolarik.

NEW YORK — Whenever LaQuint Singleton found himself about to get into a fight out in the courtyards or in the small playground in front of his building at the General Ulysses S. Grant Houses, he would run and find his mom, Venus. He’d scamper up the stairs and go up to her looking for protection. Back then, Singleton was a good student who regularly attended school and attended church service every Sunday. One day, in an attempt to impress the older teenagers and men, he carried a gun to give to another resident. He was arrested, and spent six months in Rikers Island waiting for his case to wend its way through the criminal justice system — and then another year after he was sentenced.

“They sent him to the Island, and he came back a monster,” Venus Singleton said, sobbing on the steps of an apartment building on Old Broadway, referred to as the DMZ by people on both sides of the blood feud between the Grant and Manhattanville Houses. “That boy they sent back is not the same boy I sent them. The department of corrections turned my son into a monster. I love my monster, but that’s what he is. That’s what the Island did for me.”

Now, Singleton said, more monsters are about to be made.
Continue reading

The Racialicious Links Roundup 12.12.13: Nelson Mandela, New York’s Poor, Black Republicans and more

You will make out that apartheid was just some sort of evil mystical space disease that suddenly fell from the heavens and settled on all of us, had us all, black or white, in its thrall, until Mandela appeared from the ether to redeem us. You will try to make Mandela a Magic Negro and you will fail. You will say that Mandela stood above all for forgiveness whilst scuttling swiftly over the details of the perversity that he had the grace to forgive.

You will try to make out that apartheid was some horrid spontaneous historical aberration, and not the logical culmination of centuries of imperial arrogance. Yes, you will try that too. You will imply or audaciously state that its evils ended the day Mandela stepped out of jail. You will fold your hands and say the blacks have no-one to blame now but themselves.

Well, try hard as you like, and you’ll fail. Because Mandela was about politics and he was about race and he was about freedom and he was even about force, and he did what he felt he had to do and given the current economic inequality in South Africa he might even have died thinking he didn’t do nearly enough of it.

I’ll be 34 this year and we’re only beginning to see a change in the scenery when it comes to diversity and the fantastic. A recent UCLA study found that even though racial and gender diversity in television remains appallingly low, more diverse shows bring higher audiences while less diverse ones struggle. Meanwhile, some major networks may finally be getting the message. At this year’s annual Fox Broadcasting confab, titled “Seizing Opportunities,” the underlying theme was more diversity equals more money. Speaking to an invitation-only crowd of executives, producers, agents and media coalitions, Fox COO Joe Earley said this about welcoming more diverse shows: “Not only are you going to have more chances of a show being made here, more chances of a show being a success on TV, more chances of making it into syndication, more chances of a show selling globally and making you millions of dollars, but you are going to bring more viewers to our air and keep us in business.”

Cultural critics have rightly decried whitewashing in the name of social justice. Networks are now beginning to see dollar signs where they once imagined dearth. But beyond money and morality, diverse programming is also a question of quality. “Racist writing is a craft issue,” the poet Kwame Dawes said at this year’s AWP conference. “A racist stereotype is a cliché. It’s been done. Quite a bit. It’s a craft failure.”

Without an understanding of culture, power and history, diversity is useless; it’s blackface. And television has often given us nothing but that: cheap stand-ins and tokens to up their numbers and check off boxes.

Continue reading

Activists Put #DonLemonOn Blast

By Arturo R. García

(Note: Video contains NSFW language toward the end.)

Actually, Cenk Uygur is wrong about one thing: not only is CNN’s Don Lemon aware of the NYPD’s “stop and frisk” program (or, as he insists on calling it, “stop, question and frisk”), but he sued a Tower Records store in 2001 after a security guard allegedly attacked him, thinking he stole a CD player.

But Uygur is correct in noting the alarmist tone in Lemon’s commentary on The Tom Joyner Show on Tuesday. And, it turns out, social activists and the Twitter communities caught that, as well — and brought that to light throughout the day.

Continue reading

Diverse Reads: The 2013 Brooklyn Book Festival

The Brooklyn Book Festival runs from September 16th-22nd, but the main stage of events takes place on the festival’s final day, September 22nd. There are over 40 panels open to the public and featuring a diverse group of book authors, columnists, and other writers speaking on a wide variety of subjects. Check out beneath the cuts for a selection of recommended panels featuring Saphire, Anthea Butler, Sonia Sanchez, James McBride, Toure, and many, many others. If you’re in the area next weekend this is an event I highly suggest stopping by, and if nothing on our list stirs your fancy you can see the full schedule here.

Continue reading

Open Thread: Stop and Frisk Ruled Unconstitutional

South Asians protest against Stop and Frisk, via HuffingtonPost.com

The New York Police Department deliberately violated the civil right of tens of thousands of New Yorkers with its contentious stop-and-frisk policy, and an independent monitor is needed to oversee major changes, a federal judge ruled Monday in a stinging rebuke for what the mayor and police commissioner have defended as a life-saving, crime-fighting tool.

U.S. District Court Judge Shira Scheindlin said she was not putting an end to the policy, but rather was reforming it. She did not give specifics yet on how that would work but instead named an independent monitor who would develop an initial set of reforms to the policies, training, supervision, monitoring and discipline.

“The city’s highest officials have turned a blind eye to the evidence that officers are conducting stops in a racially discriminatory manner,” she wrote. “In their zeal to defend a policy that they believe to be effective, they have willfully ignored overwhelming proof that the policy of targeting “the right people” is racially discriminatory.”

Police brass received warnings since at least 1999 that officers were violating rights, she said. “Despite this notice, they deliberately maintained and even escalated policies and practices that predictably resulted in even more widespread Fourth Amendment violations,” she wrote in a lengthy opinion.

She also cited violations of the Fourth Amendment protection against unreasonable search and seizure.

“Far too many people in New York City have been deprived of this basic freedom far too often,” she said. “The NYPD’s practice of making stops that lack individualized reasonable suspicion has been so pervasive and persistent as to become not only a part of the NYPD’s standard operating procedure, but a fact of daily life in some New York City neighborhoods.”
The Associated Press; August 12, 2013

 

Race + Education: New York Standardised Test Scores Hit New Lows

Standardised New York State test scores infografic via the New York Post

Clearly we have a problem.

According to the standardised test scores that came out last week only 26% of 3rd-8th grade students in New York City are reading at grade level. Only 30% of them are up to proficiency in math. The achievement gap between Black and Latino students compared with their white counterparts deepened, with only 15% and 19% respectively meeting the state proficiency standards in math. Those are considered all time lows.

Despite the fact that NYC almost matched the performance of New York State overall, let’s ignore Mayor Bloomberg’s spin factory and acknowledge that this indicates a serious issue. The United Federation of Teachers seems to agree, and blames the NYC Department of Education (DOE) for the lower scores:

Testing became harder this year due to New York State’s implementation of the “Common Core”standards: a curriculum designed to produce college prepared students who have mastered the skill of critical thinking. That’s all well and good, but according to many teachers’ organisations the Department of Education didn’t do its part when it came to preparing teachers to help their students rise to the new standards. From the United Federation of Teachers:

Some schools will in September finally have new curriculums aligned to these standards. But, unfortunately, some schools will struggle because the Department of Education under Mayor Bloomberg refused to mandate that schools have a standards-aligned curriculum and had no plans to provide one until this union pressed the issue publicly.

The DOE just doesn’t get it. They need to learn the principles of Education 101: that the DOE needs to provide every teacher with a Common Core-aligned curriculum with scope and sequence in order for teachers to create lesson plans from that curriculum. Only in that way can we help students learn the subject matter on which they will be assessed.

PR Campaign from the New York City Department of Education. Both ads (en espanol can be seen on the DOE site) curiously only feature students of color.

These new Common Core standards weren’t a surprise. They didn’t sneak up on the DOE in the dead of night. They’ve known for two years that this was coming, which left them enough time to throw up a full bilingual ad campaign warning that the tests were going to be more difficult yet somehow not enough time to make sure that all schools in the city had the necessary curriculums to pass the new test. There were schools in poorer areas of the city where no students (as in zero. zilch. nada.) passed the math exams. One principal at a school in East Harlem watched her students’ English and Math proficiency scores drop from 33% to 7% and 46% to 10% respectively. It’s likely safe to assume that her’s isn’t  the only school serving poor, minority students seeing that  drastic of a plunge.

Criticisms of standardised testing in New York City aren’t new. In prior years when the scores were higher it was argued that the tests weren’t actually measuring a student’s ability to do anything more than regurgitate information after a school year of cramming and rote memorisation. My fourth grade classroom where we learned nothing but creative writing, long division, and the history of the Lenni Lenape tribe would not fly during this era of Teaching To The Test, with the sole purpose of meeting those standardised benchmarks. Of course, it’s hard to do that when you don’t have the curriculum to do it with and a new test with some questionably unfair material.

As someone who works with 5th and 6th grade minority students who have scored in the top 10%  on their standardised tests in past years I can tell you this: as you move beyond the skills of powering through math problems and underlining sentences to answer reading comprehension questions you can see where the deeper education stops. The arts of essay and creative writing have seemingly vanished with Teaching To The Test, along with those critical thinking skills the Common Core hopes to inspire. And those students who do buck the trend and get a bit creative on their standardized tests (like I did in the 2nd grade when I wrote a full, rambling story about World War 2 as an answer for a relatively simple standardised test essay question) are usually punished for it in their scores (my mother was told I needed to be in a remedial reading class).

For a variety of reasons standardised tests –Common Core or not– are probably not the best judge of overall student intelligence. There are parents who believe that so strongly, and are so tired of the constant testing that they had their children boycott the tests this year in protest. That said, if we’re going to insist on using standardized testing as a measure then we should at least be making sure that students have the tools necessary to succeed. Not only do these scores help place children in gifted and talented programs within the public school system, they can help parents get their kids into charter schools, or programs that might help them enter into independent schools like Oliver Scholars or TEAK. Low test scores don’t only reflect badly on the DOE, they can actually limit and hinder an otherwise bright child’s options to escape the DOE.

So In a week where we combine a new achievement gap low with finding out that the city’s solution to lack of middle-class Pre-K access is having parents take out student loans for their four year olds, one really has to wonder where public education in New York City is heading and how far Black and Latino students are going to have to fall before anything is done.

Retrolicious–Mad Men 6.9: “The Better Half”

Hosted by Tami Winfrey Harris and Andrea Plaid

Pete: "Wanna play 'Father Abraham'?" Joan: *direct side-eye*

Pete: “Wanna play ‘Father Abraham’?”
Joan: *direct side-eye*

To paraphrase One Chele from Black ‘n Bougie, it’s Tapback Season…at least on Mad Men. Don, Roger, and Peggy try their luck to get back with former and sort-of current lovers with varied results. Tami, Renee Martin from Womanist Musings and Fangs for the Fantasy, and I chat about this bit of silliness, the joys of “Father Abraham,” and the joy of talking about how the show handles racism with like-minded  folks. Tami kicks off the convo…and, yes, spoilers.

Tami: Can I say how glad I am that we have this space here? I have always found the poor racial analysis of Mad Men by viewers and recappers even more problematic than anything the show has done. And now, in this season, where Weiner and Co. have made some egregious racial missteps (cough…Mammy Thief…cough), I’m even more glad to have a group of intelligent and racially conscious people to discuss the show with.

Continue reading