Tag Archives: Martin Luther King Jr.

Quoted: On Yesterday’s Anniversary of the March on Washington

Images from yesterday’s march via TheNation.com

I spent eight hours today amongst thousands at the March on Washington, and the people present were some of the most remarkable, resilient people I have ever had the privilege to be around. The number-one face on T-shirts, placards, and even homemade drawings was not President Obama or even Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. It was Trayvon Martin. I also witnessed homemade signs calling for jobs programs, speaking out against the school closures and in solidarity with those overseas victimized by US militarism. The people at this march are the face of resistance to what Dr. King called the “evil triplets of militarism, materialism and racism.”

The main speakers at the march, however, did not match the politics and urgency of those who gathered in the Saturday heat. Even more frustrating is that few tried. I expect to get all kinds of hate mail for what I’m about to write, but not to write it would be an act of duplicity based on what I saw and what I heard. I saw the great Julian Bond get only two minutes to say his piece before being shuttled from the stage. I saw Reverend Jesse Jackson, who has done remarkable work in recent years against the banks and predatory lending, also get less time than a pop song. I saw Reverend Lennox Yearwood, who is doing some of the most important work in the country connecting climate change to racism, get ninety seconds before being cut off. There was one speaker at the 8 am pre-rally who said the word “drones,” and that was it for any discussion of US foreign policy.

Based upon the speeches during the main portion of today’s events there can be little doubt that the Dr. King who was murdered in Memphis in 1968 would not have been allowed to speak at this fiftieth-anniversary commemoration of his life. There was no discussion of the “evil triplets.” Instead, we had far too many speakers pay homage to the narrowest possible liberal agenda in broad abstractions with none of the searing material truths that make Dr. King’s speeches so bracing even today.

Seeing ‘New Jim Crow’ Placards  Seized by Police & More From The March On Washington, by Dave Zirin via The Nation.

Retrolicious–Mad Men 6.5: “The Flood”

Hosted by Tami Winfrey Harris and Andrea Plaid

Well, Mad Men fans and critics wondered how the show would handle the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Hosts Tami Winfrey Harris, along with Renee Martin from Womanist Musings and Fangs for the Fantasy and Racialicious staffer Joe Lamour, chat about how Weiner and Co. does, as well as how plaids mark a character and why white hipsters wouldn’t live in Brooklyn yet–”yet” being the operative word.

You know the drill: spoilers. And here we go…

Tami: Before we get into this Mad Men episode that deals with MLK, Jr.’s assassination and the racial unrest of the late 1960s, I have to ask: Where does the group stand on Matt Weiner’s treatment of race in Mad Men up until now?

I’m on record as thinking he has done well, despite the absence of many characters of color in the show. I know at the very least Renee disagrees with me. What say you, roundtablers?

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Racialicious Crush Of The Week: Harry Belafonte

By Andrea Plaid

Harry Belafonte’s music moves in my mind and life like a childhood memory: I know he’s there and smile or dance when I hear one of his songs just for the little-kid joy it brings to me. (My personal cut: “Jump in the Line,” made famous again by Tim Burton’s Beetlejuice.)

But he moves through my own political consciousness (budding back in the 80s) as one of the first celebrities to organize efforts to aid and stand in solidarity with African countries, from speaking out against apartheid in South Africa and co-organizing the musical benefit record “We Are the World” to now, where he’s harshly criticized former president George W. Bush’s policies about Iraq.

However, Ms. Owner/Editrix, Latoya Peterson, who saw Belafonte’s documentary not too long ago, breathlessly said at a recent Racialicious editorial meeting, “He is Racialicious.”

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Quoted: Rachel Griffin On Rosa Parks

My urge to scream is rooted in our common cultural practice of remembering Parks only as a demure and delicate old seamstress who sparked the civil rights movement. The common assertion is that Parks’ moment in history began in December 1955 when she refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white man in Montgomery, Ala. But we must confront this assertion, because each time we confine her memory to that moment we erase part of her admirable character, strategic intellect and indomitable spirit.

To be clear, Rosa Parks left us a deliberate legacy of activism, not an accidental activist moment. Furthermore, she, like many other Black women, should not be remembered in the shadows of Dr. Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. or any other Black male civil rights activist, but rather right alongside of them. We must realize and teach that when Rosa Parks was helping lay the foundation for the civil rights movement, Dr. King was still in high school.

- From “Black Herstory: Rosa Parks Did Much More than Sit on a Bus,” in Ms. Magazine

TechnoRacism: White Supremacist Site Hijacks Dr. King’s Legacy with SEO Chicanery

MLK Memorial

Over at the Click the Toad Blog, the Chief Toad explains how the MLK Jr. official legacy site was outranked by white supremacists with a good grasp of SEO:

My hands are shaking with anger as I type this. A sick, cowardly, and racist website (hereafter referred to in insult-laced bold type) that trashes the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr is outranking the official Martin Luther King Jr website on Google. I will not provide a link to the racist site, as I will not directly contribute a single visit to them. However, I will show exactly how the official Martin Luther King website (found at http://www.thekingcenter.org) got beaten in the SEO (Search Engine Optimization) battle. My dream to improve The King Center‘s SEO and Google Rank may not be as lofty and inspirational as Martin Luther King Jr’s, but I do have a dream. [...]

One of the best ways to beat a web competitor is to look at their metadata and their successful keywords… and then outdo them at their own game. So here is what The Racist Pukes have going on for their SEO (and the official Martin Luther King Jr website could simply borrow and improve upon all of these):

Racist Pukes’ Homepage Title: Martin Luther King Jr. – A True Historical Examination
Racist Pukes’ Meta Description: The truth about Martin Luther King: Includes historical trivia, articles and pictures. A valuable resource for teachers and students alike.
Racist Pukes’ Meta Keywords: Martin Luther King Jr, Civil Rights, Black History, Slavery, Reparations, Kwanzaa, Anti-Defamation League, ADL, anti-Semitism, racism, bigotry, hatred, prejudice, bias, Holocaust, Israel, democracy, terrorism, militia, Jews, Jewish, diversity, anti-Semitic incident, racist, discrimination, Holocaust denial, neo-Nazi, Nazi, Nazis, tolerance, civil rights, Black, extremism, extremist, hate crimes, skinheads, Middle East, Islamic Extremist, education, White supremacy, minority, bias, religious freedom, tolerance, religious right, Martin Luther King Jr., free speech, MLK, school prayer, religion, justice

We often talk about the legacy of civil rights being hijacked to suit the needs of those who would undo those gains in a heartbeat – this is a literal manifestation.

Activists need to up our tech game. Because this is just ridiculous.

(Spotted on Chris Rabb‘s facebook wall)

Live Tweet – MLK Memorial – Leaders of Civil Rights Lunch

These are the live quotes from last week’s MLK Memorial Dedication service.

About to live tweet the leaders of civil rights lunch in honor of the MLK memorial. Gonna eat, since the program is long and press stand.
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August 25, 2011
MLK III just finished speaking, Barbara Conrad is now singing a passage. Coming soon: Eric Holder, Sheila Jackson Lee, Jesse Jackson.
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August 25, 2011
Eric Holder is onstage. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Holder: Dr. King’s spirit still has the power to embolden people to overcome, to come together and stand against injustice. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Holder: Our time together must not be just abt pagentry and revelry…we must rededicate our commitment to social justice. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Holder: We must rekindle his spirit…the work of uniting our nation is incomplete. His task is now our task; his dream, our dream. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Holder: I am amazed that a direct beneficary of the civil rights movement is in the White House…but the work is still not complete. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Holdet: We face hard tasks, but we must not give into cynicism. It is our moral imperative to take up the mantle. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Holder: Individual actions count. We have no excuses for our collective failure to act. Individuals must stand up and be counted. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Holder: Thank you for continuing his work, and contiuing to believe that one day, we will walk together into the promised land. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Aside: I officially have a braincrush on Eric Holder. #civilrightssquee
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August 25, 2011
Gospel break! Soon to come, Sheila Jackson Lee, Jesse L. Jackson, Sr., Janet Murgia of La Raza. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
The comedian they just announced did not get a clap. He was not amused. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Comedian is making AARP jokes & gospel jokes. His style really makes me miss Bernie Mac. Now he’s doing the black names bit. #latoya #mlk
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August 25, 2011
The EVP of marketing for BET is speaking (not on the program.) I’ve been reading MLK quotes all day, so I’m going to squash the snark. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Oooh. She’s testing me. BET is now showing their civil rights music video. Set to “Miracles.” I will try to find this. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Sheila Jackson Lee, Jesse Jackson, and Janet Murgia are all onstage at the same time. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
SJL is performing “Who Am I” a poem-tribute dedicated to Dr. King. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
SJL: Work cannot come without action. We have to be willing to die for justice. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
SJL: You must litigate for justice. Do not be afraid of using the courts to uphold justice. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
SJL says we are in the greatest reactionary period since the reconstruction and post Jim Crow. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
SJL: Justice doesn’t come from a law degree. It comes from being willing to die for judtice and using litigation as a tool. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Victoria Rockwell is onstage talking about love – she’s framing her convo around foster care and transracial adoption. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Rockwell is telling stories of her foster mom, prayer, and and learning who God was. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
@malaikamose you’re right!
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August 25, 2011
Correction: Previous speaker is Victoria Rowell, not Rockwell. Now, Janet Murguia. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Murgia: Part of King’s Dream was that America lives up to its ideals. The tenets of the Constitution and Declaration belong to us. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Murgia: I am a child of Dr. King’s dream. It was universal. And it was a call to action. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Jesse Jackson onstage. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Jackson: How many people have a family member in jail? A family member in foreclosure or behind on their rent? #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Jackson: Student loan debt? Credit card debt? Half the room is standing. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Jesse: We got the proclaimaton without the emancipation. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Jackson: Those who came to Ellis Island were welcomed; those who came to Jamestown VA as slaves were not. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Jackson: The march on Washington was an act of defiance. You have to have confrontation & negotiation before you have reconcilliation. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
@ElaheIzadi Comedian was Jonathan Slocumb.
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August 25, 2011
Jackson is talking about hopes – all legislative actions. “The Tea Party is not new – it’s a new name for an old game!” #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Jackson specifically calls out states right supporters as wanting to destroy the civil rights act, bit by bit. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Jackson: We fight back in Dr. King’s name, because we are not afraid. Keep hope alive and march on. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Julian Bond onstage. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Bond discusses being at the March on Washington. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Bond wss talking about being in SNCC, and being asked to hand out cokes to cekebs like Sammy Davis Jr.
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August 25, 2011
Remembers MLK as the guy at the grocery store and the bank – they were three houses apart. #mlk
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August 25, 2011
Bond: Dr. King was the first man to speak to both blacks and whites in the common language of Christianity. #mlk
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August 25, 2011

For Your Black History Month: Real Housewives of Civil Rights

By Sexual Correspondent Andrea (AJ) Plaid

I guess I’m not the only one who found the solemnity-yet-randomness of the Black History Month Minutes in my youth a tad ridiculous.  I understood why the segments were needed and learned a lot from them–and still found my hand in front of my giggling mouth.  The comic troupe Elite Delta Force 3 may have felt the same way.

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