Tag Archives: Latoya Peterson

Forbes Shows Our Fearless Leader Some Love

Racialicious Owner and Editrix Latoya Peterson. Courtesy: Forbes Magazine.

Quick note to let our Racializens know: guess which Editrix made it into the ranks of Forbes Magazine’s 30 Under 30 Media list, joining the best and brightest from outlets like The Washington Post, CNBC, Salon, YouTube, The Huffington Post and many more? And she’s not even done with her fellowship yet.

Congratulations, Latoya!

Hail To The Chief!: Racialicious’ Editrix Named 2012-13 Knight Journalism Fellow

By Arturo R. García

Please join the Racialicious team in congratulating our Editrix, Latoya Peterson, who was just selected for a John S. Knight Journalism Fellowship at Stanford University. Latoya will join 12 other Fellows from around the nation and eight international Fellows in pursuing their own proposals for improving the field of journalism, while also taking part in special seminar and independent courses.

Latoya’s studies will cover how to democratize communication and societal participation through the multimedia and text capabilities of mobile technology. She joins colleagues from outlets including NPR, Al Jazeera English (where she has also appeared as a commentator), National Geographic, and The Wall Street Journal Americas, among others. The program, which began in 1966, has hosted almost 800 journalists, and has produced 26 Pulitzer Prize winners.

The big news kicks off a heck of a week for our boss: you can catch her on a panel at ROFLCon this weekend in Cambridge, MA, and she also appears in the latest episode of Mark Anthony Neal’s webseries Left Of Black, discussing the legacy and the lessons of the anger that overtook Los Angeles in the wake of the Rodney King verdict 20 years ago.

Ignite Talk: Hacking Diversity, Part 1 – How Do We Define Culture?

Back in June, I participated in an experimental journalism unconference called Spark Camp. The conversations were great and the other attendees were amazing, but one of the highlights of the conference were our ignite sessions. An ignite talk is when presenters agree to create a five minute talk on any subject, accompanied by twenty slides that advance automatically every 20 seconds. This was a bit nerve-wracking for me, since I’m an extemporaneous speaker by nature, and it takes me about five minutes to get warmed up enough to relax (and to slow down my naturally quick speech pattern.) But it turned out fairly well. Took me a while to get into the rhythm though. I decided to do my first ignite talk on Nirvana and how we define culture, since I spent most of June working on the Spin article out in this month’s issue (More on that later). So here’s the video – transcript after the jump:

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The Latoya Tour: “Ain’t I a Woman” In Brooklyn

If you’re in the area tonight, please check out Latoya–who’s teaming up with Elizabeth Mendez Berry–refusing the silence about race, feminism, and activism. :-)

Galapagos Art Space
16 Main Street
Brooklyn, NY

Ain’t I A Woman: Women of Color Speak On Activism
April 11th, 2011, 6PM – 12AM
Mixer 6PM ** Panel 7-9PM ** Party 9-12AM

Long after Sojourner Truth pondered the question – “Aint I A Woman?” we continue to face a white supremacist culture that undermines women of color, young women, undocumented immigrants, and the LGBTQ community. We’re convening this panel to ignite a discourse about the experiences of women of color in the feminist movement and beyond. On this night, six outstanding feminists and activists will go head-to-head to discuss race in the feminist movement today.

We know that the movements to eradicate racism, ableism, homophobia, transphobia and sexism are inextricably connected. We reject the silencing and subjugation of women of color and aim to create a safe and courageous space to raise our voices, confront tensions, celebrate our triumphs, create collective solutions and share our stories. Through this sharing, we can create a united front so that, instead of surviving through silence, there can be a dialogue on how to battle institutionalized oppression.

Speaking our truth is crucial to our survival. By gathering together and learning from our shared and individual tales of love and struggle, we will each emerge with new perspectives that will enable us to engender the change we envision for the world.

In the words of bell hooks, “There can be no feminist revolution without an end to racism, classism, ageism…”

Round One: Latoya Peterson, Founder of Racialicious
Elizabeth Mendez Berry, Journalist

Round Two: Lori Adelman, Program Associate at International Women’s Health Coalition
Aimee Thorne-Thomsen, Reproductive Rights Activist

Round Three: Jessie Daniels, PhD, Author and Sociology Professor at Hunter College
Anna Holmes, Jezebel Founding Editor

Music by DJ Lobotomy Copter throughout the night, http://on.fb.me/gRnBsN

**$10 Suggested Donation (but no one turned away for lack of funds)
**We encourage live tweeting during the event using the hastag, #AIAW

** For more info, contact Morgane at refusethesilence@gmail.com with the subject line: “Ain’t I A Woman”

Price: $10 to help us cover reservation costs, but no one will be turned away for lack of funds.

Shameless Promotion Thread – Love from the LA Times, Essence Magazine, More Magazine, Clutch Magazine, and Awards Galore + Special Guests!

by Latoya Peterson

essence page

I’m terrible at remembering to do these kinds of things, but we, as the Racialicious collective, got a lot of love the last few weeks and want to acknowledge that.

Jessica Yee

Jessica has been named a “Distinguished Visitor in Women’s Studies” by the University of Windsor. Here’s her statement:

All I know is that for me it is feminisms with an “s.” Feminism for me is so much more than women’s issues, it’s human rights. I think it’s important to pull it apart. One definition is not going to do it.
I think it’s dangerous to have one definition of feminism.

Jess was also awarded the Harmony Award!

Harmony Education Foundation honours Jessica Yee for her work in breaking down barriers of discrimination and fighting for social justice. Her advocacy and activism for a more inclusive and equitable Canada epitomizes our ideal of a “youth leader for social change”.

Just as a visual representation, this is Jessica’s life according to Twitter:

# about to go watch my sister warrior and fave Native hip-hop lyricist Lindsay Eekwol Knight throw it down at the University of Saskatchewan about 15 hours ago via web

in Saskatoon presenting “Workin’ It With Two Spirit Youth” at the All Nations Hope 4th Annual Aboriginal HIV/AIDS & HCV Conference about 24 hours ago via web

Getting on the plane to Saskatoon! (@ Ottawa International Airport) http://4sq.com/b1rKvc 2:17 PM Nov 3rd via foursquare

5:30am train back to Ottawa to speak w/ fellow Onkwehonwe strong woman Ellen Gabriel “Oka Crisis, 20 Years Later” then 4pm plane 2 Saskatoon 9:46 AM Nov 3rd via web

On the train back to Ottawa – here for a whole 4 hours today! Lol (@ Via Rail Train Toronto-Ottawa) http://4sq.com/9qc6ZU 7:59 AM Nov 3rd via foursquare

Press Advisory – YOUTH ACTIVIST JESSICA YEE TO RECEIVE 2010 HARMONY AWARD: TORONTO, Nov. 2 /CNW/ – http://bit.ly/aal1MK 11:16 AM Nov 2nd via twitterfeed Retweeted by JessYee

Nia:wen ko:wa to all my friends, family/of choice, and most of all the youth who this award was for. Love you all so much 10:17 PM Nov 2nd via web

incredibly humbled tonight and blessed to have such an amazing community of support for me to receive 2010 National Harmony Movement Award 10:15 PM Nov 2nd via web

At Six Nations Polytechnic today working with kick-ass First Nations youth across Ontario on HIV leadership prevention http://4sq.com/ahwxpl 8:14 AM Nov 2nd via foursquare

hitting the road to Six Nations for Chiefs of Ontario HIV Young Leaders Forum today! 7:19 AM Nov 2nd via Twitter for BlackBerry®

Girl…celebrate with a nap!

Andrea Plaid

In addition to tirelessly working on the blog carnival, and being our resident Twitter socialite, the fabulous Ms. Plaid was recently spotted on a Women’s ENews panel about “Drawing the Line: Sex and Consent.” Here’s a clip of the live event:

Fatemeh Fakhraie

Fatemeh, in the midst of editing and writing, was also quoted in the LA Times, on the inclusion of Iran and Saudi Arabia on a new U.N. agency devoted to women’s rights.

Fatemeh Fakhraei,[sic] the editor of the U.S.-based Muslimah Media Watch, expressed similar concerns.

“It’s important to have representatives from the Middle Eastern region on this board, but it’s equally important to have representatives who are genuinely committed to improving women’s rights,” she wrote.


Arturo Garcia

Y’all see him every day on site – but did you also know that he moonlights as a DJ? Arturo, post a mix!

Nadra Kareem

Nadra Kareem is knee-deep in writing for TheLoop21.com, Change.org and About.com.

Thea Lim

Thea is buried in her next novel. She says “after four years of blogging, I am trying to learn to appreciate much slower modes of publishing. :)” But several of her articles for Racialicious are being reprinted in Canadian and American textbooks, including Canadian Content and Opposing Viewpoints.

Latoya Peterson

It’s been a good few weeks for media coverage.

The image at the top is from Essence Magazine’s November Race Issue, where they said:

“Latoya Peterson is like that whip-smart friend who effortlessly breaks down the nuances of White Privilege but can also gab about True Blood. As editor of the blog Racialicious, the 27-year old offers witty, fearless critiques of race and pop culture.”

Thanks!

Clutch Magazine & HP partnered to present 50 Amazing Tech Tastemakers – and they named me one!

Tastemakers

I am so honored to be in the company of Tameka Kee and Lynne D. Johnson who are two of my personal tech heroes.

I was also in a young feminist spread over at More Magazine:

More

text

I would transcribe the text, but it’s basically my bio and a quote about having women in front of and behind the camera. All of my comments about race ended up on the cutting room floor, which I expected.

It was great meeting Morgane, Lena, and Jen, but where there is feminism, there is always drama. (See here, here, here, here, and here.)

Last night, I was on a panel about the Future of Blacks in Television – soon as a video is up, I’ll link to it.

And on to our special guests…

While he’s not officially a member of Team Racialicious, he’s with us 100%, so we were thrilled to see the fabulous Phil Yu (aka Angry Asian Man) hitting the cover of KoreAM:

Phil on Koream

Jen & Diana have honored him with a Babewatch post.

And speaking of the dynamic duo behind Disgrasian, they were also named in Koream as one of the top 10 Asian American blogs. Heeeeeeelllllllll Yeah!

Jen and Diana - Pinkies Up!

I was flipping through one of my fave design magazines and spotted Anil Dash, talking about his new company and open government:

Anil Dash

And somehow, Baratunde ended up in a Lexus commercial:

He talks about it here.

Clutch Magazine Shows Our Editrix Some Love

By Arturo R. García

Latoya is too modest to bring this up herself, but we’d be remiss if we didn’t highlight her getting name-checked in a rousing post by Britni Danielle on Clutch Magazine’s blog regarding this decade’s vanguard of Black feminist writers, including, among others, Lisa Jones, Tricia Rose, Rebecca Walker and Joan Morgan:

I remember reading When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost when it debuted and thinking that Joan Morgan was speaking FOR me. I loved hip hop, hard. It was my first crush, the soundtrack to my youth, it inspired my passion for writing, but I always felt some kind of way about the ease in which women were relegated to the sidelines. With the exception of a few dope women (Latifah, MC Lyte, Salt-n-Pepa, Lauryn), women were almost always seen as sidepieces and groupies.

But I kept listening. Even though I danced to its beats, would argue about who was the best emcee, and would defend hip hop like it was my big brother, I always felt uneasy about its willingness to label other women (because clearly, they couldn’t be talking about ME, right?) bitches and hoes. Joan Morgan’s in-your-face exploration of women maturing in the age of hip hop articulated my own contradictory feelings about a culture I loved, but didn’t always love me.

This new brand of feminism understood that the struggle of women wasn’t about hating men. It wasn’t about writing them off and branding them as enemies. Our feminism—as beneficiaries of many movements of equality—was about claiming our voice, articulating our worth, and fighting our own, modern, battles.

From there, Danielle shifts the discussion toward online media, including …

RacialiciousRacialicious explores the intersections of race and pop culture. Blog editor Latoya Peterson and company cover everything from current hot topics (such as Dr. Laura’s “Nigger” problem), to discussions of TV shows, commercials, and other media sources that feature minorities. The aim of Racialicious is to hold the media accountable for questionable images of people of color. This collective blog is an amazing source for intelligent critiques and discussions regarding how we are viewed in the public realm.

So thanks much to Clutch for the shine, and to you for your continued support.

Social Justice And Video Games

by Latoya Peterson

Here are the slides to our presentation, with a few quick notes added. Check back in about three hours, and we will have the video of the session and the Q & A available (just as soon as it finishes loading.)

Some things to remember: We found ourselves with about four hours of material that needed to be shrunk into forty minutes – so a lot of things we wanted to discuss (the Jade Raymond situation, recruitment and outreach from the gaming industry, how different races/ethnicity are represented in games) hit the cutting room floor. In one of the segments, I refer to a fifty page paper I’m holding on to – that paper covers those topics more in depth, and I will publish it here after I revise it some more.

(Special thanks to Naomi and N’Gai for agreeing to be on the panel, everyone who showed up, those who weren’t there but tweeted and retweeted the findings, and Allison Bland for volunteering to tape this!)

Social Justice and Video Games – Part 1 from Latoya Peterson on Vimeo.