Tag: John Boyega

December 28, 2015 / / Entertainment

By Arturo R. García

Don’t look now, but Rey isn’t the only polarizing character coming out of The Force Awakens.

Unlike Daisy Ripley’s Rey, however, the criticism surrounding Finn isn’t coming from misanthropic white men, but POC who feel John Boyega’s character comes up short — at least thus far — among the new group of Star Wars protagonists.

We’ll save the spoilers until we get below the cut. But personally, I don’t think we can really say where Finn is going until Episode VIII unfolds. Boyega’s performance, however, should not be an issue. And mark me down as being supportive of Finn/Poe shippers in our midst, while also hoping that his adventures with a lightsaber are foreshadowing for bigger feats.

Still, it’s worth looking into some of the analysis spilling out from Finn’s first appearance. And be advised: SPOILERS FOR THE FORCE AWAKENS BEGIN AFTER THE CUT.
Read the Post Voices: The Debate Awakens Around John Boyega and Star Wars’ Finn

December 1, 2014 / / Entertainment
July 22, 2014 / / Entertainment

By Guest Contributor Keith Chow, cross-posted from The Nerds Of Color

Earlier this week, Lucasfilm announced the addition of two more actors to the cast of Star Wars Episode VII. We do not yet know who the two relatively unknown actors — Pip Anderson, who’s British, and Crystal Clarke, who’s African American — will play in the movie, but I’m guessing their roles must be substantial enough to warrant a press release about their casting. If their characters are indeed prominent, Clarke will join John Boyega and Lupita Nyong’o in making this “the blackest Star Wars ever.”

Still, every time breaking Star Wars casting news comes across my feed, there’s always one name that I hope to see in the headlines:Ming-Na Wen.

Read the Post The Disney Triple Crown: Why Ming-Na Wen Needs To Be In Star Wars

June 30, 2014 / / Africa
September 27, 2011 / / black

By Guest Contributor Kartina Richardson, cross-posted from MirrorFilm

On Saturday nights in 1993, the TNT television channel played science fiction movies back to back beginning at midnight. They called this the TNT “Monster Movie Marathon.” As my parents had recently divorced, my sister and I now spent weekends at my father’s house and the Saturday night Monster Movie Marathon quickly became our tradition. We made our bed on the living room floor and taped each movie on the VCR. Them! was a favorite, as was The Day the Earth Stood Still. The Thing, both the 1951 version and John Carpenter’s became beloved, as did The Day of the Triffids and Cronenberg’s The Fly. When I think of great science fiction now, these are a few of the films that come immediately to mind. When my five future children watch sci-fi movies I wonder if my list of favorites will be on their’s. Maybe it will, maybe it won’t but one thing I know is this: they will love Attack the Block with the fervor of their dear mama.

In Joe Cornish’s directorial debut, ruffian teens from a South London council estate (the projects), find their Bonfire Night thievery interrupted by an alien invasion. Lead by boss boy Moses (John Boyega), the boys: Jerome, Pest, Dennis, and Biggz, use their wily and hilarious teenage ways to escape the bad guys (aliens, police, a murderous rapping drug dealer) and defend their home.

Block is a tight, fast, movie, whose pieces (sound, photography, acting, editing, production design, dialogue) fit together in perfect harmony. Energy is palpable in all aspects of production.

Passion is infectious, and after seeing Block, so great was my enthusiasm, that my body, confused by this unusual excitement, grew alarmed and immediately flushed water out my armpits in great rivers.

“Is it hot in here bruv?” I said to the friend beside me.

“Nah blood, it ain’t,” he said. And at that moment I knew. I knew that any movie able to stimulate my glands to such a degree was a fine film indeed.

I luff Attack the Block bruv. Trust.

SPOILERS AHEAD
Read the Post All In The Same Gang: Examining Attack The Block’s Approach To Race