Tag: Jada Pinkett Smith

September 23, 2014 / / Entertainment
An entirely accurate summation.
An entirely accurate summation.

By Kendra James

Gotham 1×01 was not a good hour of television.

I am 99.9% sure, looking through completely objective and non-nostalgia tinted lenses (she says, unconvincingly), that the Birds of Prey pilot from 2002 was better than the pilot FOX served up last night. Unlike my beloved BoP, the Jim-Gordon-cum-Gotham-City origin story is about two white men and thus Gotham will most likely get more than 13 episodes to try and be great.

“Try” being the key word.

Normally I would attempt to find some beacon of hope mired deep in the muck of a pilot, but Gotham is a show that sounds like its using a comic book script for its dialogue –and no, it’s not a Greg Rucka script– and looks like at least 30 minutes of it was shot through a sepia tinted instagram filter. While envisioning characters’ dialogue appearing in speech bubbles above their heads, trying to be obligatorily impressed when familiar face appeared every ten minutes(“Hey, look, Poison Ivy! ”/ “Cool, it’s the Riddler!” / “Oh boy, Penguin!”), and watching the woman playing Jim Gordon’s fiancee ‘act’, I realised I’m not convinced that this show is ever going to be good.

Instead of grasping at straws to call this a win, lets just quickly list the great things Fish Mooney (Jada Pinkett Smith) and Renee Montoya (Victoria Cartagena) did last night:

Read the Post Recap: We’re Gonna Have to Live Through At Least Two Seasons of This; Gotham, Pilot

March 28, 2013 / / links
November 29, 2012 / / Meanwhile On TumblR

By Andrea Plaid

Jada Pinkett Smith and Willow Smith. Photo Credit: Bauer Griffin. Image via Zimbio

What captured the most likes and reblogs in our corner of Tumblr this week? Jada Pinkett Smith on her giving her daughter, Willow, the autonomy to cut her hair…or, rather, a post from Feminist Griote on Pinkett Smith’s position about it:

Willow as a little girl is learning that she is a force to be reckoned with in this world, and that her gender, and gender presentation will not serve as impediments. Jada who is now championing the cause against human sex trafficking, of which girls are disproportionately victims, understands that women need to own themselves fully, if not someone else will. Girls are being trafficked at an alarming rate and not just abroad, but also in our own backyards. In the U.S. alone 80% of human sex trafficking victims are women and girls and 50% are minors. Jada is making the conscious choice to take her daughter along with her on her journey to help end human sex trafficking. In a world where little girls are raped, stolen, and sold as a commodity, hair isn’t all that important.  Sometimes I wonder, have some of us adult Black women forgotten what it’s like to be a little Black girl in a white heterosexual patriarchal society? Again to quote Lorde, “easier to crucify myself in you than to take on the threatening universe of whiteness…” Our Black bodies and Black psyches are always being assailed and violated. Healthy validation is often hard to come by in these streets riddled with harassment. Therefore, let us save our vitriol and condemnation for more important things like the perpetuation of rape culture or Donald Trump.

Read the Post Meanwhile, On TumblR: Jada Pinkett Smith On Willow Smith’s Hair

May 18, 2011 / / hollywood

by Latoya Peterson

Mindy Kaling Book Cover

Much is afoot in Hollywood.

According to Vulture, Mindy Kaling’s future on The Office is uncertain. Kaling is both talent and a writer-director; while she may remain in her onstage role, it is unclear whether she will continue to write for the show. In the meantime, Kaling is staying busy with other film roles, her book project (pictured above) and attempting to woo Rainn Wilson toward an Orson Wells biopic by promising blackface. (Joke explained here.)

HBO believes in Treme – it’s been renewed for a third season.

NBC has cancelled Outsourced and the Event. Since Undercovers was also cancelled, what does this mean for NBC’s “More Colorful” promotion? And how will this impact their perception of minority fronted shows?

Stacy Dash returns to the small screen in the Queen Latifah-produced romantic comedy scripted series Single Ladies. She is joined by Lisa Raye, and Charity Shea as the token white friend. Mixed Media Watch ahead: Shea’s character is in a relationship with a black man – and all is not what it seems.

Read the Post The Hollywood Shuffle – On Our Radar, 2011

February 22, 2011 / / black

By Guest Contributor Aymar Jean Christian, cross-posted from Televisual

The New York Times’ recent article on Hollywood’s “whiteout” about the lack of black nominees for the Oscars has caused some controversy, mainly for forgetting to mention Whoopi Goldberg. But there may be an unintended consequence to Hollywood’s race problem — if we concede there is a particularly recent one, which I’m not sure is true:

Are more A-list black actors moving to television?

Read the Post Is Hollywood Pushing Black Actors to TV?

June 23, 2009 / / diversity

Hosted by Special Correspondent Arturo R. García

hawthorne1

The premiere of Hawthorne wasted no time defining Jada Pinkett Smith’s title character: emotionally conflicted over her husband’s death and a classic, though caring, workaholic, fighting authority – not to mention the local authorities – in the name of her job and her corps of nurses.

What makes the show more notable isn’t just Jada’s star turn; it’s the fact she’s joining Holly Hunter and Kyra Sedgwick as star/executive producers of their TNT vehicles. The idea is, the network gets the star power, and in Pinkett-Smith’s case, as she told USA Today, she gets “a lab where [she]I could learn about story structure.”

Ahh, but how did the first story play out, with its’ suicidal patients, homeless miracle babies, patient sexin’, rebellious daughter and posthumous interracial(?) romance? Before tonight’s episode, let’s consult some friends. ROUNDTABLE, ASSEMBLE!

Read the Post Hello, Nurse!: Putting Hawthorne on the (Round)Table