Tag Archives: Hollaback

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Quoted: Brittney Cooper on Hollaback’s NYC Street Harassment Video

There are actually two parts to this. One is, there are troubling racial politics, but it’s not just about men of color. The other racial politics about this are that white women appear the most vulnerable, right, to these menacing men. But this happens to women of color, and women of color have been on the front lines. Three years ago at the Crunk Feminist Collective, we published a video that Girls for Gender Equity did where they had Black teenage girls talking about being harassed, and that video does not have 25 million hits.
– Interview aired on “All in With Chris Hayes,” Oct. 31, 2014.

“Hey … Shorty!” by Girls for Gender Equity NYC can be seen below.

Announcements: A Mural Goes Up In Harlem And A Goddess Walk

Photo courtesy of Picture the Homeless.

Photo courtesy of Picture the Homeless.

Just got this last-minute invite to a really great event going on in Harlem, if you’re in town later today.

Picture The Homeless (PTH), a grassroots social-justice organization founded and led by homeless people advocating around the issues of housing, police violence, and the shelter system, reveals their new mural based on those themes today at 4pm at 138t Street and Adam Clayton Powell. The mural is on the side of Epiphany Bar. (More details here.

According to Shaun Lin, one of PTH’s community organizers, the mural was a 6-month collaborative effort of people of all ages living in the community.

“This mural itself is actually the conclusion of a 6-month collaborative process between Picture The Homeless, Peoples Justice, and artist Sophia Dawson. We started with a few study sessions–of “Broken Windows” theory, “quality-of-life” policing, and resistance/organizing around these policing practices–which guided a collective visioning process in which particular images drawn directly from study and conversation. And finally concluded in the painting of the mural, which included 2 community painting days and over 80 volunteers [sic]. The mural itself is beautiful in itself, but the process of creating and painting the mural has been one of the most engaging, collaborative, and community-oriented projects I’ve personally worked on.”

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Street Harassment And Race: A Sliding Scale

By Guest Contributor Chiquita Brooks, cross-posted from The Goddess Festival: Oshun Returns

Is it just me or has street harassment reached an all time high?! Granted, as women we learn pretty early on that men will “cat call” us at any given time they deem appropriate once we’ve walked out of our homes. It doesn’t matter if you’re sitting in the car at a red light with your mom, or if you’re a mother with your child in hand, at foot, in stroller, or on back, these factors will not deter some men from their quest to get your attention. Unfortunately, it has become common place that cat calling or street harassment is something that as women we “have” to deal with, preferably in silence.

Those of us who identify as LGBTQ are also subject to street harassment, especially if we refuse to wear clothes that are gender specific. I personally experienced the most vicious street harassment, as a queer woman of color. From threats of rape & even death threats simply because I was walking with my partner.
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MoSex for the R!

By Sexual Correspondent Andrea (AJ) Plaid

Yep, I–along with sexpert and Racialicious booster Twanna Hines–will talk about sexing it up and street harrassment at the Museum of Sex in NYC tomorrow .  (Yes, we have a museum devoted to sex in NYC. Pick up your jaw. ;-))  If you’re in the city, please come…no pun intended!

The Right to be Sexy in the Bedroom and on the Street!
The Museum of Sex
233 5th Avenue, 27th Street
New York, NY
7:30-9:30pm
(Suggested Donation $10)

We have a right to look as sexy as we want, with no repercussions! When our bodies and sexuality meet activism, we can take back control and turn victimization on its head.

Join us on April 21st for a screening of The Line at the Museum of Sex’s subterranean locale. Sip elderflower cocktails at the sleek Laboratory/Bar space and join a post-film discussion with sultry panelists discussing sexuality rights and activism. Panelists include Emily May of Hollaback! Twanna Hines of Funky Brown Chick, Andrea Plaid of Racialicious, Tara Ellison of Third Wave Foundation and NOLOSE, and Nancy Schwartzman, director of The Line.

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Your Panelists

Nancy Schwartzman is the director and producer of documentary films The Line (2009) and xoxosms (April 2011 release), as well as the director of The Line Campaign, a multimedia campaign to promote sex-positive dialogue about relationships, sex, and consent.

Emily May is the Co-Founder and Executive Director of Hollaback!, a movement dedicated to ending street harassment using mobile technology, fighting against the notion that street harassment is culturally acceptable.

Twanna Hines is is a Manhattan-based writer and sexual & reproductive health / rights advocate, hailed as one of “the internet’s sultriest sharers” by the Village Voice, details about her rendezvous have been printed in Glamour magazine and she has made media appearances including on CNN, NPR and Gawker.com

Andrea (AJ) Plaid has the distinction of being the first Sexual Correspondent for Racialicious, the award-winning blog on race and pop culture. Her work on race, gender, sex, and sexualities has appeared at Change.org, Bitch, and Library Journal and her posts have been republished at Penthouse.com, Colorlines, BlogHer, and New American Media. Andrea’s writing also appears in the just-published anthology Feminism for Real: Deconstructing the Academic Industrial Complex of Feminism, edited by Jessica Yee. She has been quoted in Washington Post and Chicago Tribune. She has lectured at John Jay College of Criminology as well as participated in Harvard’s Feminist Coming Out Day 2011 as a guest panelist. She also owns an eco-friendly safer-sex kit company, Freak Kits. Andrea lives in Brooklyn, NY. 

Tara Ellison is the Deputy Director of the Third Wave Foundation and a board member of NOLOSE, a fat queer and trans organization. Among other types of activism and advocacy, Tara has also been blogging about things like race, class, gender, activism, sex, and sexuality for a decade.

Photo Credit: High Street Heels