Tag Archives: George Takei

The Racialicious Links Roundup 4.25.13

It’s clear that we as Black and Brown Americans, are still recovering from the racist indoctrinations of the past 500 years. Though laughable it sounds, white Americans, too, have suffered from this crime. As our country began and brown races were systematically denied the right to be human and so internalized the role of the savage, white consciousness bullied its way into objectivity. The white mind became the unbiased mind that objectively observed all the rest. This is called The Default: The belief that the white experience is a neutral and objective experience and white consciousness is the standard consciousness unless otherwise specified. White culture, and American culture as a whole, suffers from the tragedy of whiteness as the default setting.

Being The Default keeps white Americans from being liberated because it denies them a specific identity by absorbing them into neutral blankness. This creates a lonely detachment from the rest of the world. Being The Default is the largest privilege granted to white Americans, yet it is so deeply entrenched it is the most invisible (we cannot see the edges of the atmosphere, but it exists). Whites benefit from being The Default by having inherent legitimacy in a way that’s denied to people of color. Their experience of life is “normal.” Whites are free from the constant awareness (and subsequent constant paranoia) of existing in another person’s world. Because The Default has so successfully dominated our subconscious, because our egos have been shaped by it from the moment of birth, we perpetuate it in micro ways while fighting inequality with more obvious actions. The silent poison continues to poison. Whiteness as The Default keeps brown people in subjugation by convincing them that every part of their being, physical, spiritual and emotional, exists within a white narrative. When you are made to exist within something you are forced to be smaller than that which contains you. This is precisely the basis of racist thought. Brown existence, brown consciousness is smaller.

So let me start with the standard roll call: As an American Muslim, I condemn all violence in the name of religion. Terrorism has no religion and Islam is no exception. If the Tsarnaev brothers are guilty of the Boston bombings, then I hope they are brought to justice.

Is that condemnation clear enough? Because I’m pretty sure a whole lot of people instead read “blah blah blah blah blah.”

Here’s the deal. It is a shame that we had to employ 9,000 officers, put our lives on hold for five days, and sacrifice $1 billion in Boston revenue to catch these culprits. It is a shame that Muslim women were assaulted in retaliation, and that’s even before we knew who the suspects were. And it is a shame I received threats of anti-Muslim violence and that even my non-Muslim but non-white friends called me, fearing for their safety.

And now the public lynching and double standards against Islam begin. Mental illness was the culprit during Newtown, Conn., Oak Creek, Wis., and Aurora, Colo. More than 70 percent of America’s 64 previous mass shooters were white American men. But not one pundit, nor any politician, nor any Muslim has ever asked why White Americans or Christian Americans are not aggressively condemning these acts of terror. After all, why ask such a ludicrous question? Anyone with a functioning cerebrum could comprehend that these terrorists represent only themselves.

Last week, a bipartisan group of senators known as the “Gang of Eight” introduced a new immigration reform measure. Their bill would continue to strengthen our borders, fix the legal immigration system and provide a path for the 11 million undocumented to register, pay taxes and play by the same rules as everyone else before they could get on a path to citizenship.

Unlike the 1986 law, this approach is tougher and also expands employer verification so that those doing the hiring are compelled to own up to their responsibilities. It’s the right approach.

For many immigrants, there was never a path to come legally. But they’re here now; they’ve put down roots. They’re not looking for a handout, just a chance to work hard and do the right thing.

President Reagan once said that “Latinos are Republicans. They just don’t know it yet.” In that spirit, I would argue immigration reform is the conservative thing to do. Conservatives just don’t realize it yet.

One of the audio kiosks is placed just about at the site of the crude barrack that housed my family and me — block 6, barrack 2, unit F. We were little more than numbers to our jailers, each of us given a tag to wear to camp like a piece of luggage. My tag was 12832-C.

I have memories of the nearby drainage ditch where I used to catch pollywogs that sprouted legs and eventually and magically turned into frogs. I remember the barbed wire fence nearby, beyond which lay pools of water with trees reaching out from them. We were in the swamps, you see: fetid, hot, mosquito-laden. We were isolated, far enough away from anywhere anyone would want to live.

Today, I recognize nothing. The swamp has been drained, the trees have all been chopped down. It is now just mile after mile of cotton fields. Everything I remember is gone.

The most moving of the sites is the cemetery. As a child, I never went there, yet that is the only thing that still stands from Rohwer Camp, except for a lone smokestack where the infirmary once operated. The memorial marker is a tall, crumbling concrete obelisk, in tribute to the young men who went from their barbed wire confinement to fight for America, perishing on bloody European battlefields. That day, I stood solemnly with surviving veterans who had served in the segregated all-Japanese American 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the most decorated unit in all the war.

Men’s sports are always treated with higher regard than women’s sports, period. No announcement from a female athlete is going to generate the attention that an announcement from a male athlete does, regardless of what the announcement is. Such a division is clearly seen in men’s NCAA sports versus women’s, let alone in professional sports. (Even in Olympic sports, male sports get more primetime coverage [outside of volleyball, track and gymnastics] and while most can easily cite Usain Bolt as the fastest man in the world, do they know that Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce is the fastest woman in the world? They’re both Jamaicans. This gender issue isn’t even accounting for the racist [and sexist] media issues regarding Olympic sports.)

Female athletes are always assumed to be lesbians unless the media and public deem that they meet an almost hypersexualized version of femininity to derail such homophobic assumptions for misogynist ones. Further, the sheer act of being physical and competitive (as in sports) are associated with patriarchal notions of gender, so women engaging in sports is often viewed as being “male-like.” (We see the same type of rhetoric regarding women in combat, for example.)

At least 15 members of the Congressional Black Caucus are questioning why the 50,000 diversity visa program was ended in the “gang of eight” immigration reform bill formally introduced yesterday. Many members view the diversity visas as one of the few ways African and Caribbean immigrants can become American citizens.

At their Wednesday, Rep. Yvette Clarke (D-NY) briefed other members of the CBC on diversity visas and the “merit based” point system language in the immigration bill that is said to be a replacement to the diversity visa program. The diversity visa lottery was ended and replaced with a “point system” that evaluates immigrants on a merit based system. Education and ability to speak english, among other things, is used to evaluate an immigrant’s value to the U.S.

One member, Rep. Don Payne, Jr. (D-NJ) said early in the week that he will not vote for an immigration bill without the diversity visa lottery.  ”I’m not voting for it if diversity visas are not in there,” Payne said flatly. “I’ve told my constituents that unless the diversity visa lottery is in the bill that’s where I draw the line.” On March 15, Payne held a conference focusing on the concerns of Liberian immigrants on Capitol Hill.

Payne may not be alone. Rep. Corrine Brown (D-FL) also says she is very unhappy that the diversity visa program was ended in the “gang of eight” bill. Members wondered why a program with 50,000 slots was eliminated when the larger issue is the 11 million people currently living in the U.S. undocumented.

“My question is why would you take it out? Tell me one good reason?” said Rep. Corrine Brown (D-FL).

Racialicious Crush Of The Week: George Takei

By Andrea Plaid

Courtesy: wikimedia.org

Of course, when I think of this week’s Crush from the standpoint of my childhood, he’s forever Lieutenant Hikaru Sulu, looking calmly into the starry universe and co-steering the USS Enterprise through it on the reruns I’d watch with my mom on Saturday afternoons. In my adult life, he’s the criminally underutilized character, Kaito Nakamura, on Heroes. And a helluva of a social media user and activist, boldly using the former for the latter.

The US government forcibly relocated Takei’s family from their home in Los Angeles to an interment camp in Arkansas in 1942, when he was 5 years old, and then to another internment camp in northern California. After World War II ended, his family moved back to Los Angeles. In junior high school Takei was voted student body president; he was also a Boy Scout at his Buddhist temple. After the jump is an interview in which he recalls his childhood:

Continue reading

Coming Attractions: George Takei And Lea Salonga In Allegiance

By Arturo R. García

We generally don’t review a lot of plays here at the R, but this looks to be a marked exemption: next month will see the premiere of Allegiance, a musical starring George Takei and Tony Award-winner Lea Salonga, in my town, and I’m planning on being there.

The show will follow the Omura family, who are among the 120,000 Japanese-Americans sent to internment camps during World War II. Takei plays Sam Kimura, who is forced to confront his estrangement from his family in the decades after the war, while Salonga, in flashbacks, plays Sam’s older sister Kim, who finds herself on her own collision course with her family’s stance during their imprisonment.

Earlier this year, Takei used his online popularity to raise $150,000 for the show in an IndieGogo campaign. The show will hit the stage about a year after doing workshop performances in Los Angeles. During the production’s pre-Broadway run in San Diego, an art installation honoring internment camp residents will be on display in the theater.

The show debuts not long after another local production, The Nightingale, was criticized for going with “colorblind casting” in a play set in ancient China, leading to an audience protest during a workshop performance last month.

“Inadvertently, this kind of thing says you continue to be irrelevant,” one attendee said. “Reminds me how invisible [Asians] still are and how we are so often not invited to sit at the table. The play takes place in an Asian country and it is like a knife to the heart.”

The Friday Mixtape – 6.1.12 Edition

Starting us off this week are Portland’s own The Slants, who are giving fans an interesting incentive for pre-ordering their latest album, Slants! Slants! Revolution. The band is looking to raise $10,000 via Kickstarter to pay for a new tour bus, and, if they meet their goal, anyone who contributes $50 or more will be memorialized on the bus with their name, location and a custom message, on top of other swag like exclusive content. And as the band explains on their fundraising page, for a group that’s played more than 350 shows around the U.S. and in Europe in just four years, new wheels are definitely a priority:

We’ll be able to purchase an older shuttle bus and renovate it for the tour. This would mean that we wouldn’t need to tour with a trailer anymore, be much safer on the road, break down less often, and have a little more space on our house on wheels.

Among the group’s stops on the road thus far have been anime conventions (Spoilers: they’ll be playing a gig this July during the San Diego Comic-Con), and that gets reflected in the video for “You Make Me Alive,” where some cosplayers get to shine alongside the band.

This next track is one of those asides that makes late-night web searches worth your time: a few years back, members of Tijuana’s Nortec Collective – a group of DJs who blend beats from Northern Mexico with techno – decided to cover Depeche Mode’s “Never Let Me Down” with the backing of a brass band. The ensuing cultural collision packs a punch worthy of the original.

Speaking of collisions, here’s a mash-up from DJs From Mars pitting Rihanna’s “We Found Love” against “Every Teardrop Is A Waterfall” by Coldplay. It’s okay, Coldplay doesn’t bring the mood down this time.

Our friends at Bold As Love turned us on to this track by Brooklyn-based Maya Azucena, whose music has been featured on shows like The Wire and 30 Rock, and has performed – by request, even – at the United Nations’ Millenium Development Goals Summit in 2010. If you’re not familiar with her, “The Half” is a great introduction.

We take to the stage for our final track, what with the trailer for the new film adaptation of Les Miserables hitting the web this week, with the only voice you hear being Anne Hathaway’s take on “I Dreamed A Dream.” The film will also feature Samantha Banks as Eponine, a role that Lea Salonga brought to life on Broadway. This fall, Salonga is scheduled to star alongside George Takei in Allegiance – A New American Musical set during the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II. Here’s Salonga as Eponine during the 10th Anniversary show for Les Mis, with “On My Own.”

Finally, with summer kicking off, let’s open this thing up a bit: we are now taking requests! If you’ve got a track or an artist that you want your fellow Racializens to know about, drop me a line at arturo@racialicious.com and we’ll give you some shine.

George Takei Steps Up His Protests Against Akira Whitewashing

By Arturo R. García

Actor George Takei’s penchant for activism has helped shed light on efforts to protest the upcoming big-screen adaptation of Akira – first with the tweet pictured above directing fans to join Racebending’s petition against the possible whitewashing of the story’s principal characters, and now with an interview with The Advocate that has garnered attention around blogging circles.

Weeks ago, a shortlist of actors reportedly being considered for the main roles of Kaneda and Tetsuo was revealed to be composed exclusively of white actors – in spite of the original character names being retained for the new version.

In the interview, Takei notes the practice’s history in Hollywood, specifically citing the film adaptation of Pearl Buck’s The Good Earth, and mentions the folly of changing the characters’ race in another, more recent film:

The idea of buying the rights to do that and in fact change it seems rather pointless. If they’re going to do that, why don’t they do something original, because what they do is offend Asians, number 1; number 2, they offend the fans. The same thing happened with M. Night Shyamalan. He cast his project [The Last Airbender] with non-Asians and it’s an Asian story, and the film flopped. I should think that they would learn from that, but I guess big studios go by rote, and the tradition in Hollywood has always been to buy a project, change it completely and flop with it. I think it’s pointless, so I thought I would save Warner Bros. a bit of failure by warning them of what will most likely happen if they continue in that vein.

In an ideal situation,Takei went on to say, would be for the movie to be cast with Asian-American actors. As Racebending had previously reported, only 2% of Warner Brothers films from 2000 to 2009 had an Asian actor in the lead.

Not only has Takei’s interview with The Advocate been quoted on mainstream entertainment sites like Perez Hilton and Moviefone, but it also appears some geek-oriented outlets are finally taking notice of the issue: Newsarama and NerdBastards have linked to Takei’s interview in a complementary fashion, though Newsarama’s J. Caleb Mozzocco still doesn’t seem to quite understand the issue at hand, as he followed his link with this statement:

While I admit being attracted to the sheer insanity of casting twenty-something white guy Robert Pattinson and 30-year-old white guy Justin Timberlake as Japanese teenagers Tetsuo and Kaneda, if they don’t land Pattinson while he’s still  a chick-money magnet, I can’t imagine this going over well at the box office or in film reviews.

“Insanity,” of course, is not what this is about. But, at least people are talking about Takei’s statements and remembering that he’s been able to balance his progressive stance with his sense of fun: