Tag Archives: Denim Day

Around the Web: Farai Chideya’s “Hu-manifesto”; Denim Day; Face It; HB 56

The Asian Task Force on Domestic Violence has been instrumental in bringing Denim Day–part of an international protest against victim–blaming to the Boston Area. But as April 25th approaches, the youth focused group has a major problem:

This year, the youth program has no funding. In order to do Denim Day, we need donations of fabric paint as well as safety pins. So to help us stop violence in our communities, we ask you for some much needed help. Usually Tulip brand fabric paint is easiest because it’s a squeeze bottle. You can generally get them at Michael’s (Medford or Braintree), at A.C. Moore (Somerville), and at most art stores. If you are in the Boston area, just contact Danny (info below) and we can definitely try to meet up and pick them up. If you’d like to mail them, please also contact Danny & he can give you our mailing address. You can also get them from Amazon.com At checkout, you can set it to send it to ATASK, and the items will be sent directly to our office and to the youth.

For more information, visit their site.

Farai Chideya is on the Root, penning “A ‘Hu-Manifesto’ for a Post-Trayvon World” on approaching volatile situations in the media and cutting through the noise to get to the substance. A sample:

3. Follow the Money

One of the basic tenets of journalism is to follow the cash and expose the manipulation of laws and justice. Although 21 states have “Stand your ground”-style laws, that didn’t happen by chance or come from a grassroots movement. The National Rifle Association has lobbied ceaselessly (to the tune of $35 million annually) for concealed handgun and “Stand your ground” laws. In a perverse sense, they benefited from the election of President Barack Obama. Fear of a Black President sent gun sales through the roof.

On March 20, just weeks after Trayvon’s death, a U.S. senator from South Dakota introduced Senate Bill 2213. Called the “Respecting States’ Rights and Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act,” it would permit people who have concealed weapons in their states to carry their concealed weapons anywhere in America. So much for states’ rights, huh? The NRA also happens to have a concealed-weapons hoodie in its merchandising line. Keep it classy.

One of the best things we can do to honor Trayvon Martin’s memory is to call out the laws, lobbyists and lawmakers that have increased the number of deaths of unarmed men, women and children. A lot of people have changed their social media avatar to Trayvon, a bag of Skittles or an image of themselves in a hoodie. Our country needs these people who can react instantly on social media to also plan ahead and vote in elections. And don’t stop there. Engage with your lawmakers between and during elections, and track campaign contributions. That will help create a fairer and safer America.

The “Face It Campaign” and HB 56 after the jump. Continue reading