Tag Archives: Dark Wolf

Quoted: Elizabeth M. Clark On Racial Politics and Werewolf Transformations

Patrick Gonder’s work on “the primitive” in 1950s horror films is useful here. Gonder discusses the ‘devolved’ monsters of 50s horror cinema, such as Mr. Hyde and the cavemen-primitives, in terms of race, class, and notions of civilization. He writes that the “hybrid nature of the [devolved monster] asserts white masculinity against and through the fantasy of a primal, animalistic black sexuality.” The beast within (excessive, uncontrollable masculinity run amok) that the werewolf represents for (white) men is always coded in terms of a non-white ethnicity and/or the working class. Cinematic werewolves are almost always associated with non-white ethnicities, from the gypsies in The Wolf Man (1944) to the Indian mystic/scholar in Wolf. [...]

A third text that breaks the pattern of ‘unintegrated heroine = less grotesque body’ is Dark Wolf (2003).  However, this film’s portrayal of the grotesque hybrid body is perhaps the most racialized representation of the female werewolf. Continue reading