Tag Archives: Condoleezza Rice

Condoleezza Rice’s Extraordinary, Ordinary Look at the Role of Race in America

by Latoya Peterson

Condoleezza Rice is an intriguing figure to watch as she moves across the national stage.

She held two of the highest offices in the United States – National Security Advisor and Secretary of State.

She is a Republican, yet she doesn’t shy away from talking about race, as is the custom for many members of the party.

She was a young prodigy, gifted in the arts and sports, but chose a life immersed in public policy.

Her new book, Extraordinary, Ordinary People: A Memoir of Family traces her life, beginning with her Grandfather Albert Robinson Ray III, then the lives of her mother and father, then her own life, growing up in the segregated South.  Her story flips between idyllic childhood memories of church picnics and piano lessons and terrifying memories of bombings and explosions, Rice chronicles the contradictions of the living in the land of the free, and still living with the legacy of what she terms “America’s birth defect.” Continue reading