Tag Archives: Buffy the Vampire Slayer

The Do’s And Don’ts Of A SHIELD TV Show

SHIELD logo via IndieWire.com

By Guest Contributor Kendra James

All right…as critical fans, our issues with Joss Whedon are well documented, so you can understand why ABC’s announcement that they’ve greenlit a primetime S.H.I.E.L.D. pilot written and directed by the man himself inspires more of a cautious excitement rather than all out jumping for joy.

We don’t know much, aside from it having been described as a “high-concept cop show,” that presumably takes place in the SHIELD of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (shown, so far, in Iron Man, Thor, Captain America, The Incredible Hulk, and Whedon’s Avengers). Unfortunately, the following character descriptions released this week seem to harken back to tropes and characters he’s already written. And written again.

  • Skye: This late-20s woman sounds like a dream: fun, smart, caring and confident–with an ability to get the upper hand by using her wit and charm.
  • Agent Grant Ward: Quite the physical specimen and “cool under fire,” he sometimes botches interpersonal relations. He’s a quiet one with a bit of a temper, but he’s the kind of guy that grows on you.
  • Agent Althea Rice: Also known as “The Calvary,” this hardcore soldier has crazy skills when it comes to weapons and being a pilot. But her experiences have left her very quiet and a little damaged.
  • Agent Leo Fitz and Agent Jemma Simmons: These two came through training together and still choose to spend most of their time in each other’s company. Their sibling-like relationship is reinforced by their shared nerd tendencies–she deals with biology and chemistry, he’s a whiz at the technical side of weaponry.

Maybe I’m too familiar with Whedon’s work, but this reads as a potential recasting of Firefly. And while the roles are all listed as open ethnicity and nationality, I’m willing to bet the “fun, smart, caring, and confident” Skye is cast as white while the “damaged, hardcore soldier” goes to a woman of color.

If Michelle Rodriguez’s agent isn’t all over this, they’re not doing their job.
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Frustrations Of An Asian American Whedonite

By Guest Contributor Michael Le, cross-posted from Racebending

(l-r) Nathan Fillion, Joss Whedon and Summer Glau at San Diego Comic-Con. Courtesy: Entertainment Weekly.

Equality is not a concept. It’s not something we should be striving for. It’s a necessity. Equality is like gravity. We need it to stand on this earth as men and women, and the misogyny that is in every culture is not a true part of the human condition. It is life out of balance, and that imbalance is sucking something out of the soul of every man and woman who’s confronted with it. We need equality. Kinda now.

- Joss Whedon, Equality Now tribute address

Let me preface this piece with the following:

I’ve been a fan of Joss Whedon for many, many years. I’ve seen every episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer more times than I’d care to admit. I have the complete Angel 30-disc DVD box set. I have two signed copies of Dollhouse S1 on Blu-ray (one to watch and one to keep). My girlfriend recorded her own versions of the music from Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog and I have my very own copy of Titan AE.

And, of course, I’m also a huge fan of a little show called Firefly.
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Dating a Trans Man: Negotiating Queerness And Privilege [Love, Anonymously]

Courtesy: The Aggressives and Elixher.com

By Guest Contributor Aja Worthy-Davis, cross-posted from Elixher

“Such a Black man.”

It has become a catchphrase around my house. Guaranteed to elicit an amused (and possibly annoyed) eyeroll from my partner. An inside joke that might seem odd to someone who didn’t know us–a Black heterosexually-presenting couple. Those who do know us know there’s more to the story.

I’m a queer Black femme prone to dating middle-aged divorced hippie White guys due in equal parts to my upbringing, my personality, and my personal baggage. He’s a Black man who has dated more than his share of middle-aged divorced hippie White lesbians. And (I guess this is the kicker) when we met in our staunchly Catholic high school over a decade ago, he was a girl. He was also my laid-back butch best friend I couldn’t stop thinking about when I kissed my boyfriend. We skipped after-school activities and hung out in the Village holding hands. We giddily queered-up our Drama Club performances to culturally-sheltered teenagers who wouldn’t recognize queer if the Gay Pride Parade marched in front of them. We identified with Willow and Tara, which I think says it all. Watching Pariah was like watching our relationship played back at us, only we were Annie On My Mind chaste.

Skip eleven years later, my Black butch Dawson Leery is now a man. A boxers-wearing, heavy-things-carrying, messy, shaving, will-you-buy-me-a-wave-brush-Honey Black man.  When he made the physical transition, it was not all that surprising to me—he was never really comfortable in a woman’s body.  And he had long been identifying as “genderqueer” in LGBTQ spaces. This seemed like the logical next step, and I was happy for him.

But that’s easy to say because we weren’t in a monogamous domestic partnership (complete with the gentrified-Brooklyn condo and standard lesbian cats) back then. Even three years ago, it seemed like our story had forever to unfold. But once we were on the same wavelength, things moved quickly. My personal life sped up to where I thought it would slowly lead, and my mind was so wrapped-up in the practical questions (Where will we live? When will we go to graduate school? Who will do the cooking?), that it totally bypassed the more personal introspective question about how it would change my personal and relationship identity to be perceived as straight and be with a Black man.

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The Extra-Large Racialicious Guide To San Diego Comic-Con 2011, Part I

By Arturo R. García

The San Diego Comic-Con’s growth shows no signs of slowing down, even before its’ host venue, the San Diego Convention Center, begins its’ own expansion. As things stand, however, you can expect virtually all of downtown San Diego to be awash in SDCC-related events of their own. With that in mind, this year’s guide will run in two installments, while also covering some of the extracurricular festivities and celeb sightings.

Case in point: if you’re a Whedonista getting into town before Preview Night on July 20, you should go see singer Jane Lui in a stage adaptation of TEH JOSS’ Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog. The show premieres July 17 and runs thru July 30 at the Tenth Avenue Theatre. Tickets are available here, and you can see Lui talk about her transition to acting here:

With that in mind, click under the cut for a look at the POC-centric stuff going on and around SDCC. Highlighted panels will include the full description from the SDCC program.
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TrueBlood Season 4 Episode 1 Roundtable – “She’s Not There”

It’s baaaaaaack!

Racialicious has been obsessed with True Blood since it began, and its teasing around modern politics, civil rights, women’s rights, and queer rights. Our crew is definitely Team Tara, Team Lafayette, and Team Alcide…but is Team Eric ascending? When we last left Bon Temps, Tara was getting the hell out of town after beating Franklin’s head in – unfortunately, that fool was still alive, and it took a wooden bullet from Jason Stackhouse to send him on. Lafayette and Jesus had been on a roller coaster ride to mystical points unknown, Sam reconnected with his dark side, Sookie was so through with vamps that she headed to the land of the Fae, and Russell Edgington pulled out someone’s spine on national television. Let’s just relive that last moment:

The season four opener did not disappoint. The roundtable this week is: Latoya Peterson, Jordan St. John, Amber Jones, Kendra Pettis, and Alea Adigweme.

After the jump – a FULL OF SPOILERS, minute by minute roundtable, plus some random Vampire Diaries and Buffy the Vampire Slayer cross chat…

Warning: We talked for 90 minutes. This is an epically long roundtable. Continue reading