Tag: Ava DuVernay

October 27, 2015 / / Entertainment
January 12, 2015 / / Entertainment
November 25, 2013 / / Entertainment

By Arturo R. García

Olivia (Kerry Washington) and Fitz (Tony Goldwyn) indulge in a shared future for one night.

Score this round for the (relatively) good guys.

In the last episode before the winter finale, we saw the pieces begin to move. While Olivia and Fitz’s dalliance in the house revealed just how far Fitz’s obsession flame went — not to mention how badly he seems to want out of politics — the duo also came to an understanding, if not an outright alliance. Each would do what they had to do to unravel Eli and B613.

And now the wildest card of all has landed on Olivia’s doorstep.
Read the Post Open Thread: Scandal S03 E08: ‘Vermont is for Lovers, Too’

August 16, 2013 / / beauty

By Andrea Plaid

Via chaudmag.com
Via chaudmag.com

I’ve always given side-eye to Fashion Fair Cosmetics ever since I started wearing make-up. To be a part of the Johnson Publication empire–the people who bring us Ebony (and its online equivalent) and Jet–their make-up was not only too rich for my wallet but never quite fit my skin tone. (You’d think, of allllll the companies, Fashion Fair would have a shade that fit the full spectrum of Black folks and well, right?) And, to be honest, the brand itself made me think of its relevance to my mom’s generation–the fresh-off-the Movement, up-the-corporate-ladder Baby Boomers–not mine.

Of course, it would be award-winning director Ava DuVernay who would make Fashion Fair relevent to my mom, me, and younger generations.

Read the Post Friday Fun: Ava DuVernay Makes Fashion Fair Cosmetics Look Good–And Relevant!

February 14, 2013 / / Meanwhile On TumblR

By Andrea Plaid

Via kasamaproject.org
Via kasamaproject.org

Everyday Feminism’s contributing writer Jarune Uwujaren wrote a post (which is excerpted on the R’s Tumblr) that resonated with a lot of Racializens about casual racism in LBGTQ communities–and ways for white queer and trans* folks to work on making the communities more inclusive:

So if you see casual racism, remember it. And talk about it.

Notice if you’re ever guilty of it and, if you are, take responsibility for it.

I would say explain it to other white LGBTQ people, but it’s frustrating when it takes a white person saying the same thing people of color have been saying for ages to convince other white people to change their actions.

Instead, tell them to take the race related concerns of LGBTQ people of color seriously–as in listen to us.

As LGBTQ people, we get silenced all the time, told we’re too sensitive, told not to flaunt our sexuality.

Sexual minorities of color can find themselves silenced further when their concerns about race are dismissed by the predominantly white, mainstream LGBTQ community.

Let’s keep working to change that.

Read the Post Meanwhile, On TumblR: Casual Racism In LGBTQ Communities, Banning Beloved, And The Door

July 26, 2012 / / african-american