Tag: angry asian man

December 18, 2013 / / On Beauty
August 2, 2013 / / WTF?

By Andrea Plaid

Recall the previous post about Guante’s vid and its takeaway about being PC is really about not being a jackass. Well, this next pop cultural item is exactly why political correctness came into being in the first place.

Longtime Racialicious homie Angry Asian Man tweeted this:

Asian Girlz Tweet 5The shit he’s referring to is the latest anti-Asian vid called “Asian Girlz” by some band called Day Above Ground. Well, one person didn’t listen…

Asian Girlz Tweet 1Sis, I learned from your example. I listened and didn’t watch, but I did try to read the lyrics to understand why AAM said what he said. All I’m going to say is prepare yourselves for gross amounts of fuckery.

Read the Post Friday WTF? “Asian Girlz” Pisses Folks Off–And Rightfully So

July 22, 2013 / / Entertainment
July 18, 2013 / / Entertainment
March 20, 2013 / / The internet

By Guest Contributor David Zhou

Forgive me for anthropomorphizing a website.

The announcement that Google Reader would be shutting down hit me like the loss of an old friend with whom I had lately fallen out of touch–softly at first, then more powerfully. It’s easy to think as tech consumers that things die because of our neglect or disinterest. The biggest cliché that I acknowledge here is that Google Reader was more than a website, and whatever we neglected was more than a RSS aggregator. Still, Google Reader supported a blogging culture in which I have participated more infrequently over the years. Perhaps it’s worthwhile to take a wistful moment to reflect on how things have changed and what we do now.

I think I started using Reader in 2006 or 2007. I started by following some TV fan blogs that I wanted to keep up with. (I was really into Lost at the time.) When I got a handle of finding RSS feeds, I began to add everything. Blogs for cooking, news, tech, music, of college administrators and advisors, and even calendars and events. I must have cleared hundreds of items a day, reading post titles in fractions of a second. (The Trends feature in Google Reader tells me opaquely I have read 300,000+ items since 2009; apparently, it can’t fully count how many items I have read.)

In the summer of 2007, I started a blog with a close friend for our campus Asian American student organization. In the process of gathering things to write about in the world at large, I started a folder in Reader called “asian americana”, and then set out to find all the Asian American blogs there existed. There weren’t that many. Into “asian americana” went Angry Asian Man, of course. Hyphen magazine had a blog, too. Reappropriate was refreshing. Sepia Mutiny was still alive. Disgrasian was just a new upstart. If I missed any, my sincerest apologies; I read you all.

Read the Post Keeping Tabs On The Social Justice Blogosphere In The Age Of Google Reader

July 13, 2011 / / celebrities
July 11, 2011 / / activism

By Arturo R. García

This year, Racialicious won’t just be covering San Diego Comic-Con, we’ll be part of the action. I’m proud to announce that The R is partnering with Racebending to present a panel of our own:

Diversity & Fandom 102: How You Can Make A Difference
In the wake of campaigns like Racebending.com’s protests and the rise of safe spaces like Racialicious.com, fans, consumers and creators from underrepresented groups have more outlets for speaking up. This panel explores how can we take those voices and add them to the conversations we need to have with geeky business interests and our own fan communities!
Where: Room 24ABC
When: Sunday, July 24, 10 – 11 a.m.

Our moderator will be Racebending’s Mike Le, who I interviewed at last year’s event:

Also, I’m honored to say I’ll be sitting on the panel along some pretty impressive company from around the media spectrum. The full line-up, and how you can participate, is under the cut.
Read the Post Racialicious & Racebending Are Teaming Up At San Diego Comic-Con!

January 19, 2011 / / asian-american

By Arturo R. García

The controversy over Amy Chua’s Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother spread out this week online, when her oldest daughter shared her own story with The New York Post.

Written as a letter to her “Tiger Mom,” Sophia Chua-Rubenfeld (pictured above, on the right) defends her mother’s sense of humor and her parenting (“No outsider can know what our family is really like”) but also, unnervingly, seems to cast aspersions on critics:

Read the Post Amy Chua Update: Enter The Daughter