Tag Archives: ABC

G-Chattin’ Modern Family: “Two Monkeys and a Panda” [TV Correspondent Tryout]

By Guest Contributors Amber Jones and Elizabeth Lowry

Episode Recap: Cameron writes a book entitled “Two Monkeys and a Panda” about Lily’s adoption (to dispel any possible stigma) and learns that Mitchell purposefully did not hyphenate Lily’s last name on the adoption papers. Jay and Gloria argue over where their remains will go once they have died. Phil spends the day at a spa while Claire tries to keep peace between her daughters over a shared sweater.

Liz: Ok Amber… a Panda? Really? I know Modern Family likes to make a joke of the ignorance of Cameron and Mitchell when it comes to their transnational adoption, but I had to roll my eyes.

Amber: Girl, I was rolling mine too. I cringe often when Cam and Mitchell talk about Lily. The writers do attempt to make a joke of the ignorance, but I think when it comes to Lily, it gets really hard for me to just laugh it off. For one, Cam and Mitchell seem to be completely OK with exoticizing Lily most of the time. What is that about? Modern Family is so interesting because even though it does show different familial structures, most of the characters are white and upper middle class. :-/

Liz: Yeah, I’m always amused that this show is called Modern Family, as if it’s the “new” family. I’m usually thinking, “whose family is that?” As far as the jokes, I find myself sometimes laughing at the ignorance (cuz the reality is there are ignorant parents) and sometimes cringing when the joke is played less as criticism and more as “awwww look how silly but really cute they are…she’s a panda!” Because you’re right, the jokes exoticize Lily.

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The Racialicious Roundtable For Flash Forward 1.11 & 1.12

Hosted by Special Correspondent Arturo R. García
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SPOILERS AHEAD

Call it injury piled onto insult: not only did ABC choose to bring Flash Forward back opposite the opening day of the NCAA Tournament, but it ended up being arguably the best – and by best, I mean “bracket-shredding” – NCAA opening day in history. Seriously, my particular bracket looked like L.A. on Blackout Day.

simon1That said, the two-part “Revelation Zero” gets points for at least trying to seem important, as the creative team busted out seemingly every narrative trick at its’ disposal and brought in more characters to bolster its’ biggest revelation: that the man we’d come to identify as Suspect Zero was in fact Charlie The Hobbit – which made the shot of him wielding a ring somewhat funnier than it probably should have been. But what did your Friendly Neighborhood Roundtable make of all these revelations? Well, we’re glad you asked …

I’ll say this about these episodes: at least the show looked more forceful than it had been before its’ extended hiatus. Even if very little of the plot holds up if you think about it for a minute (more on this later). What’d you think?
Diana: I was surprised to see the Hobbit’s storyline step up a bit. But honestly, I’m not sure if the show is going to last for much longer.
Andrea: I agree, Diana, that Charlie Hobbit’s storyline is stepped up, but his villiany–and to a lesser extent, Lloyd’s–make my eyes glaze over because their evil, be it intentional (Hobbit) or by abbetting (Lloyd), seems to stem from the fact that they have British Isle accents and are erudite. That makes spotting Teh Baddies just that much easier ’cause ya, know, that’s how stereotypes rock.
jen*: Evil Brit tropes might be tired, but they’re more fun to watch than what-really-should-be-side-story-Benford (IMO). Maybe that’s why I was more into the first half than the second. I’m not really into the Hobbit, but I can’t not love Steve. Continue reading

Do Poor Whites Even Exist?

by Guest Contributor Average Bro, originally published at Average Bro

This post’s title is a rhetorical question. Of course poor whites exist, but not that you’d know so if you’re informed by the mainstream media. While Ronald Reagan was successful in painting urban black women as “welfare queens”, whites receive nearly 2/3 of all welfare benefits administered by the federal government. Still, Shaniqua Jackson, not Samantha McMullen, is the face of American poverty.

Last Friday’s edition of ABC’s 20/20 tried to shed some light on the woes of dirt poor rural white Americans, a group of folks so routinely (and IMHO, intentionally) ignored they’re damn near considered invisible. And while A Hidden America: Children of the Mountains is a fairly nuanced portrait of life in the hills of Kentucky, it both informs and pisses off at the same time.

The promo trailer:

A young girl discusses her Mom’s drug problem.

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