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For a Kid of Color, Unavoidable Contact With the Cops

By Guest Contributor Alton Pitre, cross-posted from Juvenile Justice Information Exchange

Photo of the author.

I never chose to be raised by my grandmother in a South Central Los Angeles neighborhood filled with injustice, gang violence and police cruelty. This was my home and the kids on the block were my friends, many of whom eventually joined gangs. Being a native of this environment, I have seen many crazy things and have always felt like I was in the midst of a world war. I have countless friends who are either dead, in jail or doing nothing with their lives. Eventually, I became a victim of this society.

My first encounter with the police happened during my sophomore year in high school. I was leaving a childhood friend’s apartment with another friend when suddenly two Community Reform Against Street Hoodlums (CRASH) Officers trespassed and entered. Unfortunately, the friend leaving with me was already on their file as a gang member. Due to my personal photos on Myspace they knew who I was before meeting me face-to-face. I was arrested immediately. As far as I could tell, my crime was being with a friend in the vicinity of where we both grew up.

We were taken to Southwest Police Station and charged with a status offense, in this case trespassing. The police were able to do this because of a gang injunction law placed in my community of L.A. known as the Jungles. Gang injunctions are court-issued restraining orders against a gang that restricts one documented gang member from being with another within a defined geographic area. This allowed the police to summarily arrest any documented gang members who were together in a gang area. We were visiting, not trespassing. After that day gang unit cops harassed me wherever I went.
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Report: Customs officials held 40 ‘low-priority’ pregnant immigrants in one facility

By Arturo R. García

Despite designating pregnant undocumented immigrants as “low-priority” targets for incarceration, officials with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) imprisoned 40 pregnant women at a detention facility in Texas while claiming not to keep “specific records” on detainees’ pregnancy status, Fusion reported on Tuesday.

Records obtained via a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request showed the women were held at the El Paso Processing Center last year, following a January 2014 report that 13 pregnant women were being detained at the facility during a four-month period, despite ICE officially stating that they should not be placed in detention centers “absent extraordinary circumstances.”
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Heidi Klum’s Redface Photo Shoot

By Guest Contributor Ruth Hopkins, cross-posted from Last Real Indians

All images via Facebook.

Heidi Klum, I’m so disgusted with you. I can’t even look at you right now.

I’ve been a fan of Heidi Klum’s show Project Runway since episode one. I’ve seen every single season. As a Native woman who loves fashion, I was elated when Taos Pueblo fashion designer Patricia Michaels was selected for the show, especially considering how Native appropriation has run rampant in the fashion industry over the past several years. Patricia made it to the series finale and finished as the season’s runner-up. Heidi was supportive of Patricia too. She complimented Patricia’s designs and showed what appeared to be sincere appreciation for Native culture.

As a result, I never could have imagined that Heidi Klum would promote redface. Nay, I was sorely mistaken.
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Quoted: Media Diversified UK on Game of Thrones And Genre Fiction’s Race Problem

While not placing it in the pantheon of truly great television, I’ve been a fan of Game of Thrones since the show debuted in 2011. I normally like my drama pessimistic, with a hard edge, and even downright cruel on occasion. I like even more that a show in the fantasy realm cares as much about its tonal execution, as it does costumes and wacky names.

And yet, I’ve never been able to relax in the presence of the programme, never allowed myself to be fully swept up in the world of Westeros. The reason why? This is best encapsulated by the conclusion of Season 3 – which Sky were so helpful to remind us of during their promotion for the upcoming Season 4.

The character of Daenerys Targaryen is emblematic of ”Game of Thrones” continuous problem with race. Beyond the emetic “white saviour“ scene to close Season 3, we are first introduced to her during a forced marriage to Khal Drogo of the Dothraki people (who are non-white). At the wedding, the Dothraki are painted as little more than savages, with the men literally killing each other to force themselves on the women; hypersexual and hyperviolent, two big racist boxes are ticked.

– From “Daenerys Targaryen Is Back To ‘Save The Coloureds’ Tour De #GameOfThrones 2014,” by Shane Thomas

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Open Thread: Scandal 3.16, ‘The Fluffer’

By Arturo R. García

Olivia (Kerry Washington) discovers that the “B” in “B613″ stands for “bootie call.”

For being a place-holder episode, “The Fluffer” did manage to pull on at least one intriguing plot thread before hurtling us headlong into the season’s Big Finish.
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‘My Children Are Not Mascots’: Cleveland Stares The #ChangeTheName Debate In The Face

By Arturo R. García

The campaign against derogatory team names “honoring” Native American communities saw another flashpoint over the weekend, as a group of protesters in Cleveland encountered one local baseball fan who saw fit to paint his face red and wear a “headdress” before the hometown team’s 2014 home opener.

As Indian Country Today Media Network reported, the protest was led by Robert Roche, a member of the Cleveland Native American Movement. At one point, he was approached by the other man, who identified himself as “Rodriguez” and insisted his attire was not racist.

Instead, he reportedly claimed it was “Cleveland pride.”

“My children are not mascots,” Roche told WEWS-TV. “Why is it okay to be racist, derogatory or stereotyping us as a race of people here?”

However, CleveScene reported that fans attending the game took the low road:

It’s actually a shame for the civil Wahoo supporters that their comrades put on such an embarrassing and primitive display this afternoon. Only twice in three hours did Pro-Wahoo folks talk politely with the protesters about the root of their opposition and try to explain their own difficulties with the dehumanizing logo. (One man turned his Wahoo hat around as a little peace offering).

For the most part, though, passers-by hurled insults. A handful of boozy risk-takers sporting “Keep the Chief” tees walked directly in front of those holding signs, to taunt. Others distributed individual middle-fingers to each protester while inviting them to fuck themselves. Others launched the familiar hate speech — “Go back to the reservation,” etc.

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Watch: Pia Glenn Takes On Nick Cannon’s ‘White People Party Music’

By Arturo R. García

This week, Comedian Pia Glenn’s Black Weekend Update webseries took aim at the new Nick Cannon album, White People Party Music, and Cannon’s attempts to both explain that he was “p*ssing people off” while it was “all in fun.”

“You want to p*ss people off? Congratulations.” Glenn says. “But when it comes to issues of race in America, some of us are trying to make change, not just urinate. And we can’t make change if your shenanigans pop up like an arcade token in my roll of quarters when I’m trying to do laundry and not here to play games.”

Thankfully, Glenn rounds up Cannon’s many misfires — and keep an eye out for Cookie Carter, as well.

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Quoted: The Nation On The César Chávez Hollywood Didn’t Show Us

America Ferrera (right) and Michael Peña as Helen and Cesar Chavez. Image via Philly.com

Cesar could be a brilliant strategist, a skill observable in agile, imaginative interaction with determined opponents, turning apparent weakness into sources of strength. But the film depicts him largely as a creature of impulse, committed to be sure, but not the brainy strategist who took special joy, as he put it, in “killing two birds with one stone…and keeping the stone.” He was a learner, a deeply curious autodidact who thrived on constantly probing diverse sources of information: books, people and experiences. When I met him in 1965, he was reading Churchill’s The Gathering Storm because, as a student of Gandhi, he wanted to learn how his opponent thought. The commitment to nonviolence was based both on his appreciation of Gandhi’s methods and the way in which the civil rights movement, and reaction to it, had been unfolding every day. But oddly, although a commitment to nonviolence was a condition for undertaking the strike in the first place, shaping the way it unfolded, the film portrays nonviolence as a reaction to events in the strike.

Events depicted as spontaneous in the film, such at the 1966 “perigrinación” from Delano to Sacramento, were, to the contrary, a result of sustained, careful planning. The “kick-off” was timed to take advantage of national media in town to cover Senator Robert Kennedy’s participation in hearings held in Delano, orchestrated by the labor movement. This “march” strategically linked efforts to promote the UFW’s first boycott, to deter farm workers from returning to Delano in the spring, to pressure then Governor “Pat” Brown to intervene on the UFW”s behalf and to rekindle the faith, hopes and solidarity of the 100 to 200 people at the core of the movement and their supporters. Cesar did not hear of RFK’s death while driving somewhere in his car—we had been in LA doing the “get out the vote” that won him the primary, and some of us were with him in the ballroom when he was shot, on his way to thank the farm workers for their help. Similarly, the “fast” was not a reaction to a few unruly farm workers, but a strategic tactic, backed with a team of organizers, of which I was one, undertaken at a key time in response to court actions alleging violent tactics, renewing commitment several years into the fight and drawing attention to the grape boycott in time for the new season. The creativity, organizational discipline and courage that produced the events depicted in the film is lost entirely in the incoherent jumble of what the film makers must have judged to be “dramatic moments,” which presented out of time, place or sequence are robbed of their real drama.

– From “Not the Cesar Chavez I Knew,” by Marshall Ganz

Race, Culture, and Identity in a Colorstruck World