Category Archives: Uncategorized


Our histories, Our Selves: Poshida‘s Powerful Portrayal of LGBT Pakistanis

By Guest Contributor Sabah Choudrey

To be honest with you, I was already a little won over. Before watching Poshida, a documentary on LGBT Pakistan I was already moved. As an LGBT Pakistani myself, I felt a connection with this film already, directed by an LGBT Pakistani person. I was feeling excited to rediscover Pakistan and meet my “other” family. Maybe one day my families will meet. This film had already given me hope.

It’s still rare that we are allowed to take claim and pride over our culture. But no matter how hidden it is, pride is something that can still shine through. I think that the mainstream assumes that just because something is hidden, it is something to be ashamed of. Especially when it is involves a number of taboos – religion, sexuality and gender diversity, namely: Islam, Pakistanis and queerness.

It’s rare that we are allowed to write our own histories and document our own lives. To let others see us the way we see ourselves. To take control of the white Western gaze that is constantly dictating our not-so-happy endings. That is why this film is already so important, before even having watched it. I want to thank the director of this film for simply having made it. This is a milestone in our history.
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Last Call For The Racialicious SDCC Creators Of Color Round-up

If you missed our first call, don’t sweat — we’re still looking to hear from any creators of color heading to San Diego Comic-Con next week.

To recap: If you’re going to be an exhibitor or presenter during the convention, or know someone who is, drop us a line in the comment thread here, or at and we’ll boost the signal as part of our SDCC preview, which will also our looks at the programming. Just let us know where to find you both at the event and online.

Also, stick around during the con, as Kendra & Arturo bring you live-tweets and images throughout the weekend!

Top image by Kevin Dooley via Flickr Creative Commons


A Quick Guide To Five Of The Cambodian Artists Featured In Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten

By Arturo R. Garcia

While a lot of rock documentaries focus on the “rise and fall” or coming and going of a particular artist or genre, John Pirozzi’s Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten: Cambodia’s Lost Rock and Roll largely fulfills a more daunting — and ultimately more haunting — assignment: chronicling the blossoming and annihilation of Cambodia’s entire musical identity, all within a 15-year period.

Pirozzi himself is invisible throughout the proceedings; instead, artists and officials who survived the period narrate the tale oral history-style, with film footage and recordings filling in the blanks and showing how vibrant the country’s musical scene became as it adapted not just North American rock but Afro-Cuban influences with its own traditions.

Under the cut, we’ll take a look at some of the more notable acts spotlighted in the documentary.
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Quoted: Thoughts on Addy Walker

For seventeen years, Addy was the only black historical doll; she was the only nonwhite doll until 1998. If you were a white girl who wanted a historical doll who looked like you, you could imagine yourself in Samantha’s Victorian home or with Kirsten, weathering life on the prairie. If you were a black girl, you could only picture yourself as a runaway slave.

Since 2013, a petition has gathered nearly seventy signatures demanding that the Pleasant Company discontinue the Addy doll. “Slavery was a vile, cruel, inhumane, unjust holocaust of Black Americans,” the petition reads. “Why would this subject matter ever be considered entertaining?” The petition accuses the Pleasant Company of “diminish[ing] the cruelty of slavery and instead glorif[ying] it as some sort of adventurous fantasy.”

I’ve never found Addy glib and insensitive, as the petitioners do—but she does trouble me. She is a toy steeped in tragedy, and who is offered tragedy during play? Who gets the pink stores and tea parties, and who gets the worms? When I received an Addy doll for Christmas, I was innocent enough to believe that Santa had brought it to me, but mature enough to experience the horrors of slavery.

“I didn’t even think about that,” my mother told me. “I just thought it was a beautiful doll.”

— Addy Walker, American Girl; by Brit Bennett, May 28, 2015



As a kid, I couldn’t really articulate what I didn’t like about Addy, other than the fact that her stories scared me shitless and her color palettes bored me. As an adult, it drives me up the wall that she was the first non-white doll the company ever made. It’s totes insane that young black girls were presented with violent stories of a malevolent slave owner, the selling off of Addy’s brother and father and the death-at-every-corner escape to Philadelphia that she and her mother made.

Non-black girls buy Addy, too, but the appeal of the franchise was, and is, that girls from different cultures have a doll of their very own, so Addy was effectively “our” doll.

Slavery’s 250-year stronghold on American people is unquantifiably important to the story of our country. In many ways, it’s how we learned to treat the other and there’s still more to learn and understand about the culture of the institution. As much as, if not more than, the American Revolution and the immigration of European people and World War II, slavery continues to influence the culture all of us live within.

The people who endured slavery were the bravest heroes our nation has ever birthed. Kids should learn about slavery. Black kids should learn about slavery. But, maybe, a doll isn’t the right way to do it. It just feels/felt…wrong.

I Secretly Hated My Addy American Girl Doll, by Whitney Teal; November 18, 2013

Quoted: Race + Waco, Texas’ Real Life FX Drama

One of the most distinct characteristics of white privilege is the privilege to be unique. When white people commit violent acts, they are treated as aberrations, slips described with adjectives that show they are unusual and in no way representative of the broader racial group to which they belong.

In fact, in much of the coverage of the Waco shootings, the race of the gang members isn’t even mentioned, although pictures of the aftermath show groups of white bikers being held by police. By comparison, the day after Freddie Gray died in the custody of police officers in Baltimore, not only did most coverage mention that Gray was black, but also included a quote from the deputy police commissioner noting Gray was arrested in “a high-crime area known to have high narcotic incidents,” implicitly smearing Gray and the entire community.

How did press reports quote the police in Waco? “We’ve been made aware in the past few months of rival biker gangs … being here and causing issues,” Waco police Sgt. W. Patrick Swanton said. Causing issues? Cops were reportedly so worried about the bikers gathering in the Waco strip mall that they had 12 officers as well as officers from the Texas Department of Public Safety stationed outside the restaurant.

Now there’s word that the biker gangs have issued repeated threats against the police in the aftermath of the Waco “melee” as The New York Times headline called it. During the uprisings in Baltimore, I saw a flurry of tweets about black people disrespecting property and throwing rocks at police. Now that these biker gangs have issued actual death threats, why am I not now seeing tons of Twitter posts about white people disrespecting the lives of police?

Waco Coverage Shows Double Standard on Race, by Sally Kohn; via, May 19, 2015


Mea Culpa: Let’s Try This Again…

by The Racialicious Team

Yeah, we know. You can say it– we won’t be insulted: It’s been a pretty quiet few months here at Racialicious. And by ‘quiet’ we really mean dead aside from the occasional burst of entertainment driven genius from our managing editor, Arturo Garcia. Unfortunately (or, fortunately, if you like things like paying rent and somehow living in three major cities) all of us, Latoya, Kendra, and Arturo, have full time day jobs in various fields and didn’t have the time to dedicate to daily posting on The R like we’d had in the past. So while Latoya’s been killing it at Fusion, bringing us things like this mental map with Carl Jones, while Art’s been writing daily at Raw Story, and while Kendra’s been making stupid youtube videos with her college friends, Racialicious has laid dormant.

In an effort to change that –starting with Monday’s post on Netflix’s Daredevil (spoiler alert)– Kendra and Art are happy to welcome Tope Fadiran on board as our new contributing and submissions editor. Tope (@graceishuman) has joined us before for chats on Scandal and protecting white kids from history, and can be found on other corners of the internet like  or her own blog Are Women Human. Your submissions should still go to, but for the most part you’ll now be hearing back from Tope. You’re all in great hands.

You’ll notice that I said ‘your submissions’. First, an apology to those who have been diligently emailing us over the past 2-3 months. As mentioned above, the Racialicious Team has been pretty busy with our daily lives and our response and edit rate has been deplorable. We love our readers and our contributors too much to let this go by without acknowledgement and a huge mea culpa. We’re sorry and we’re going to do better.

With Tope jumping aboard we are happy to announce that we are actively accepting, editing, and posting submissions. Again. You’re going to want to check out our submission guidelines (here) before you hit send, but rest assured you’ll hear back from the team.

We’re looking forward to spending the summer reconnecting with our readers, starting with a trip out to C2E2 in Chicago this weekend with Kendra. A con preview post will be up tomorrow, and we’ll be back on a regular posting schedule starting in May– more details to come! In the meantime, let’s all make Tope feel welcome with a hearty applause and a  flood of incoming submissions.


Cultural Petiton: Help Save The Renny

Gentrification continues to seem inevitable in city like New York were real estate . At only four years of residency, I’m still a recent transplant to Harlem and, with the numerous Oberlin grads I’ve talked into following me to the area, technically part of the gentrification problem.  I struggle with what that means, knowing that change can be good, but that in Harlem it’s often coming at a cost.

This time change wants to destroy one of my favourite buildings. The dilapidated Harlem Renaissance Ballroom, also known as ‘The Renny’, should have been preserved years ago. Completed in 1922, the building hosted everyone from Duke Ellington to Zora Neal Hurston to Cab Calloway. The Times gives further details:

Owned by William H. Roach, the Renaissance was a leading hot spot in Harlem and the city. Known as the Renny, it hosted Joe Louis fights. Big bands led by Cab Calloway, Count Basie and Duke Ellington performed on its stage. The Renaissance was also the home court, at a time when blacks were barred from the National Basketball Association, for the Black Fivesbasketball team known as the Harlem Rens, regarded as one of the best of its time. The adjacent 900-seat theater featured movies by Oscar Micheaux, the first African-American to produce a feature-length film. The casino was used for a 1923 anti-lynching meeting held by the N.A.A.C.P.  In 1953, David N. Dinkins, who went on to become the city’s first black mayor, and his bride held their wedding reception there. 

A rendering of the replacement complex via Curbed

Like the former Savoy Ballroom (just over and up a few blocks),  the ballroom is scheduled to be razed and replaced by an apartment complex that, as far as the renderings show, retain nothing of the original structure, historical or cultural value.

A campaign to save the ballroom has been started with a petition here that I’m encouraging anyone who gives a damn about cultural preservation to go ahead and sign. Pictures below will show that the building needs a lot of work, but it’s also so easy to imagine what it once was and what it could be again with even half the care I’m sure they’d put into the apartment complex that’s currently meant to replace it. Such an important building should never have been allowed to get to this condition in the first place.

The ballroom from behind, where it’s often used as a parking lot for church on Sundays

What’s left of one of two chandeliers hanging on the second floor

The full ballroom

The main stage with a scale comparison for size.

The Renny needs a lot of work put into preservation, but you can definitely see what it once was.



Google to Latinos: We Will Define You for You

by Guest Contributor Roberto Lovato, originally published at Latino Rebels

MISSION DISTRICT, SAN FRANCISCO—A new age is upon us, the Age of Soy.

No, I’m not talking about some new genetically-modified organism that will (further) fundamentally alter the corn in our tacos, the gas in our cars or the farmland of the Midwest.

The development of which I speak has to do with how Mountain View, California-based Google’s launch of .SOY, a web domain targeting the country’s Latinos, was supposed to herald a new day on the Latino web, with some “Hispanic marketing experts” waxing triumphant about our (finally) getting some respect from a company that has a less-than-triumphant record of hiring Latinos or black people.

And then the Latino and vegan web responded: Hey Google, “soy,” (Spanish for “I am”) sounds more like a domain name for one of the tony vegan Mexican restaurants that Google and other Silicon Valley workers eat $15 tacos at than it does a hub for online Latinos.

Far from being the Latino web sensation Google and its “experts” expected, .SOY provides fodder for the amateur comedian in us all, with Latinos and vegans joining forces, taking the “.SOY” domain and applying it to different adjectives like qué (how stupid I am), #soyhispandering or calling .SOY “The must-have domain for the lactose-intolerant.” Continue reading