Category Archives: tv

Wrap Up: The Five Things I Learned At SDCC 2013

By Kendra James

 San Diego Comic Con was overwhelming and not for the faint hearted, but also one of the most unique experiences of geekdom I’ve ever had. After taking a week to recover I wanted share a few highs and lows, insights and lessons learned from a first time SDCC attendee. 

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The SDCC Files: Kendra’s Collective Coverage

By Kendra James

IMG_2554

I had the pleasure of joining Arturo in his home town this weekend to help in expanding coverage for San Diego Comic Con. It was my first time, but despite being slightly overwhelmed I sat in on a few panels, conducted a few interviews, pimped the site out in more than one podcast interview, and managed to get us some great video footage (which will likely debut sometime next week). I’ll have my full TV news roundup later this week, but for now my SDCC Storify panel reaps, and a selection of adorable kids enjoying their con time under the cut.

I focused on the instructional panels– talks that offered advice in how to get ahead in writing and marketing yourself in the entertainment world as an indie media maker. We’ll talk more about this in depth next week, but for now the recaps from two writing panels.

The Writer’s Journey

Writing For TV

The full SDCC was rather intense, so for a (very, very) abbreviated peek with a slightly glitchy Storify, I tried to collect some of the tweeted observations from Art and I:

The San Diego Comic Con 2013 Experience

And lastly, I spent a lot of time with cosplayers this week, and they’re all under the cut:

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The Racialicious San Diego Comic Con Preview: Saturday + Sunday

By Arturo R. García

Compared to Friday and Saturday, the tail end of San Diego Comic-Con is starkly, depressingly light on diversity-centric panel discussions. But there is one major, notable highlight.

As ever, you can follow Kendra or myself to follow our progress throughout the weekend. But to take a look at more specific events, head on down under the cut.

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Gender, Race, And Going To Class: A Call For A Feminist Reading of For-Profit Colleges?

By Guest Contributor Tressie McMillan Cottom, cross-posted from The Feminist Wire

Most of us have seen the ads exhorting us to “call today!” to start on a new future with a college degree. How many of us have noticed the faces in those ads?

The gender, race, and affect of the faces and voices in for-profit college marketing are the kinds of things I  notice in the course of my research about schools like Strayer, Everest, the University of Phoenix and any number of name brands that seem to pop up every month. We know a lot about how much for-profit colleges cost (as much as the most elite college degrees) and we know a little about whom they serve but we do not ask a lot about why they serve whom they serve.

It is difficult for me to not ask that question. I interview for-profit students to ask of them what many of us have asked ourselves when one of those ads pops up at the train station or on late-night TV: why would someone enroll in a for-profit school?

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Race + Journalism: New Data Shows Lack of Diversity in American and British Newspapers

By Arturo R. García

Newspaper stand in downtown Chicago. Image by Chris Metcalf via Flickr Creative Commons.

This week has seen two developments underscoring the lack of advancement for journalists of color in the print world — and on two continents, even.

In the U.S., as The Atlantic reported, the American Society of News Editors’ (ASNE) latest study of newsroom diversity revealed a slight decline, with POC making up 12.37 percent of editorial staffers. Consider, though, that the high bar, set seven years ago, was 13.73 percent.
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Retrolicious–Mad Men 6.13: “In Care Of”

By Tami Winfrey Harris and Andrea Plaid

Keeping it real, Don Draper style.

Keeping it real, Don Draper style.

**OK, y’all…SPOILERS**

As usual, Mad Men delivered a wreck of a season ender. Don Draper had to say goodbye to what and whom he knows–”had to” being the operative phrase. And quite a few other characters had to do the same, voluntarily and involuntarily.

Tami and I grab our summer drinks and chat about what the fuck just happened.

Andrea: I’m still recovering from that last episode, Tami! Though the song may have been anachronistic, I thought a perfect song for it would have been “It’s So Hard To Say Goodbye To Yesterday” or some other leaving ditty because there were a lot of leavings, some voluntary and some forced.

One leavetaking song I can think of is “She’s Come Undone” as it applies to Sally getting kicked out of boarding school, Megan leaving Don, and Peggy getting dumped (again) and wearing pants for the first time. In their own small ways, they’re foreshadowing feminism’s Second Wave as it trickled into white women’s lives. And, what I appreciate is that Weiner and Company doesn’t make their every action a feminist one, unlike Downton Abbey and the Crawley sisters.

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It’s Bigger than Paula Deen

By Guest Contributor Dr. David J. Leonard, cross-posted from Dr. David J. Leonard

The fallout from Paula Deen’s deposition and the lawsuit itself is a reminder of the ways that race and gender operate within the restaurant industry.  It’s bigger than Paula Deen.  Yet, as you read media reports, as you listen to various commentaries, you would think this is a story about an older white woman wedded to America’s racist past.  Yes, this is a story about Paula Deen, and her crumbing empire.  But that is the beginning, not the end. This is bigger than one individual, her reported prejudices, or the lawsuit at hand.  This is about a restaurant industry mired by discrimination and systemic inequalities.

Racism pervades the entire industry, as evident in the daily treatment faced by workers, the segregation within the industry, differential wage scale, and its hiring practices.  According to Jennifer Lee, “Racial Bias Seen in Hiring of Waiters:”

Expensive restaurants in New York discriminate based on race when hiring waiters, a new study has concluded. The study was based on experiments in which pairs of applicants with similar résumés were sent to ask about jobs. The pairs were matched for gender and appearance, said Marc Bendick Jr., the economist who conducted the study. The only difference was race, he said.

White job applicants were more likely to receive followup interviews at the restaurants, be offered jobs, and given information about jobs, and their work histories were less likely to be investigated in detail, he said Tuesday. He spoke at a news conference releasing the report in a Manhattan restaurant.

There really should not be a lot of difference in how the two of them are treated,” Mr. Bendick said. He was hired by advocacy groups for restaurant workers as part of a larger report called “The Great Service Divide: Occupational Segregation and Equality in the New York City Restaurant Industry.” He has made a career of studying discrimination, ranging from racism in the advertising industry to sexism in firefighting.

Mr. Bendick said that in industries, such experiments typically found discrimination 20 to 25 percent of the time. In New York restaurants, it was found 31 percent of the time.

A recent report from the ROC (Restaurant Opportunities Center) found that Darden Restaurants (Olive Garden, Red Lobster, Capital Grille, among others) was responsible for creating a racially hostile environment.

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Retrolicious–Mad Men 6.12: “Quality Of Mercy”

Hosted by Tami Winfrey Harris and Andrea Plaid

Yes, Dawn, warm-and-fuzzier-than-thou Ted said “a Japanese.” Gurl…

One more episode before we say goodbye to this season of Don & The Gang. This season’s penultimate ep is full of fatherly angst, mostly coming from Don dealing with the fallout of Sally finding his in delicato with Sylvia, his mistress and neighbor, and with his protégé, Peggy, saying some nasty stuff about his treatment of her paramour and boss, Ted. Pete finds a younger version of Don in his midst; Megan’s still unaware of Don’s affair; Roger’s still blithely himself. And no sighting of Dawn this week–but you know we rectify that omission here at the R, as seen above.

Tami and I gather for our weekly ‘table, complete with side dishes of spoilers.

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