Category: movies

February 1, 2016 / / Entertainment
December 28, 2015 / / Entertainment

By Arturo R. García

Don’t look now, but Rey isn’t the only polarizing character coming out of The Force Awakens.

Unlike Daisy Ripley’s Rey, however, the criticism surrounding Finn isn’t coming from misanthropic white men, but POC who feel John Boyega’s character comes up short — at least thus far — among the new group of Star Wars protagonists.

We’ll save the spoilers until we get below the cut. But personally, I don’t think we can really say where Finn is going until Episode VIII unfolds. Boyega’s performance, however, should not be an issue. And mark me down as being supportive of Finn/Poe shippers in our midst, while also hoping that his adventures with a lightsaber are foreshadowing for bigger feats.

Still, it’s worth looking into some of the analysis spilling out from Finn’s first appearance. And be advised: SPOILERS FOR THE FORCE AWAKENS BEGIN AFTER THE CUT.
Read the Post Voices: The Debate Awakens Around John Boyega and Star Wars’ Finn

August 27, 2015 / / hip hop

By Guest Contributor Marquis Bey

A friend of mine asked, two days before the theatre premier of Straight Outta Compton, what impact I thought the N.W.A. biopic would have on the Black Lives Matter movement. My answer, since I had not seen or read much about the film, was insufficient and characterized by stock hip-hop feminist answers: white viewers and critics of the Movement may very well use the film to say, “See! They’re advocating violence, glorifying it even!”; hopefully it’ll give historically contextual backing to the legacy of violence visited upon Black bodies to which Black Lives Matter is speaking directly; and, of course, as with all things venerating hip-hop, I worry about the gendered violence and erasure of (Black) women.

This last point — the violence and erasure of Black women in particular — is what the conversation in the car ride with a few other Ph.D. students at my graduate school revolved around. And rightly so.

If we are to allow the film to speak to the plight of Black bodies in contemporary America and use it to do the work of Black liberation, then we must honor the aims of the Black Lives Matter Movement—and the three queer Black women who founded the movement—by critiquing the normalization of violence against Black women.
Read the Post Straight Outta Compton, Black Women, and Black Lives Matter

July 8, 2015 / / Entertainment

By Arturo R. García

Now that we’ve combed through the first half of the con, here’s the home stretch!

As Kendra said, you can follow each of us not only on Twitter — at @aboynamedart, @wriglied, and @racialicious — but on Instagram: @racialicious. I’ll also be posting images from the weekend at my own IG account, and all of our posts will be shared at The R’s official Facebook page.

With the formalities out of the way, let’s dive in to the second half of SDCC!
Read the Post The Racialicious Preview For San Diego Comic-Con 2015: Saturday + Sunday

July 8, 2015 / / Entertainment
Well, it’s that time of year again. As this posts Arturo and I will be gearing up for the five day sprint of geek culture (and alcoholic beverages) that is San Diego Comic Con.  Like our past two years of tag teaming the giant convention you can expect  our preview posts, con observations and panel live tweets from @aboynamedart, @wriglied, and @racialicious), possible tumblr updates, and –new this year– daily updates from our Instagram account, also @racialicious.

As usual, Art and I have taken a moment to highlight a few panels that spotlight diversity, Creators of Colour, and any POVs generally marginalised in fandom, entertainment, and creative spaces.  These are also the panels you’re most likely to find us livetweeting from over the next few days, so tune in and if you’re attending, don’t be afraid to say hello! I’ll be cosplaying (Peggy Carter on Thursday, Rey from The Force Awakens on Friday and Saturday, and Margaery Tyrell on Sunday), but we’ll both be recogniseable by our haggard visages and overly caffeinated shaking limbs.

Panels for Thursday and Friday are listed below, with Saturday and Sunday soon to follow! The official schedule is also posted here.

Read the Post The Racialicious Preview For San Diego Comic-Con 2015: Thursday + Friday

June 30, 2015 / / asian

by Shay Chan Hodges; originally posted at the Huffington Post

Updated Author’s Note: I wrote the following post three weeks ago, adding to the dozens of articles about race and culture in Hollywood after the release of “Aloha.” I was one of the few writers, however, who even acknowledged the existence of a native Hawaiian perspective.

On Larry Wilmore’s the Nightly Show, for example, three comedians discussed Emma Stone as “Allison Ng,” including Chinese comedian/actress Kristina Wong and comedian Jo Koy, who is Filipino and Caucasian. Within the first minute, Wilmore said: “The controversy was that Emma Stone was cast as a half-Asian woman…maybe she was like a quarter I think Hawaiian or something like that…” Comedian Koy jumped in, “yeah, a quarter Chinese I think.” Wilmore asked, “a quarter Chinese or quarter Hawaiian?” And Koy responded, “I think Hawaiian is just anything…it’s like Filipino, Japanese, it’s like if you’re in Hawaii and you eat Spam, you’re Hawaiian.”

As a mixed-race Chinese/Mongolian/Norwegian living in Hawaii for the last twenty-three years, it was truly depressing to watch an ethnically diverse group of people dismiss an entire culture in a discussion about racism.  And in all the articles I scanned that week, only one sought to delve deeper into the movie’s presentation of native Hawaiian sovereignty struggles.

Meanwhile, in real time, a significant cultural conflict has been playing out in Hawaii at the top of Mauna Kea  — a volcano considered sacred by Hawaiians  — and has barely made national news. (Coincidentally, Crowe’s depiction of Hawaiian cultural struggles was not far off from these current clashes). Yet the media continues to ignore real Hawaiian news and the perspectives of people in Hawaii.

Read the Post Land, Power, and Filmmaking in Hawaii: An Untold Story Of “Aloha”

June 24, 2015 / / comics

By Arturo R. García

As of Wednesday morning, the mantle of Spider-Man has changed hands in both the comic-book and movie realms. And while Marvel Comics scored a win on the diversity front, it’s fair to wonder if the move could pay dividends in another realm.

Because while it’s notable enough to see Miles Morales, the Black Latino character introduced in an alternate comics universe nearly four years ago, named as the protagonist in Marvel’s new Spider-Man title, it will be particularly interesting to see how the company handles both him and his predecessor, Peter Parker, after a series of moves de-emphasizing characters who, like Peter, are not part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU).

Read the Post Web of Spider-Men: Will Marvel Use Miles Morales To Stick It To Sony?

June 22, 2015 / / Entertainment

By Arturo R. García

What’s supposed to be a romantic moment in Rick Famuyiwa’s Dope ends up being one of its more problematic: we see the protagonist, Malcolm, tell his love interest Nakia, “Don’t sell yourself short” when she explains that, should she get her GED, she plans to attend a community college before, hopefully, moving on to Cal State Fullerton or a school in that system.

Malcolm’s remark is meant to be encouraging, to spur her on to defying expectations. But there’s also a touch of unwitting condescension, of classism in play in that response. And the vexing thing about Dope is that it’s a coming-of-age tale that won’t let him see that other side even as it insists he’s maturing before our eyes.

SPOILERS under the cut
Read the Post Revenge Of The Blerd: The Racialicious Review of Dope