Category Archives: fandom

The Walking Dead: “Woo” (Roundtable Prologue)

By Fashion and Entertainment Editor Joe Lamour

Last week, we welcomed The Walking Dead back with a chorus of hurrays, whoas and ewwws. Our newly assembled roundtable covered the highs (Michonne and all the beheading;), the lows (Lori, of course; an axe to the shin came in a close second), and usual stuff we’ve all come to expect: the usual lack of dialogue for T-Dog. Jeannie and I could only recall a single word and some noises (“Woo!”) this episode, but commenter Pellnore retained more:

You guys might have missed some of T-Dog’s input. For one he was talking about acquiring fresh water for the group. He also said some stuff when they were on the move. Not a whole lot but he wasn’t completely silent.

After reading Pellinore’s comment, I fuzzily recall that he spoke some additional dialogue, but I also wanted to know why I couldn’t remember anything else he said other than that woo. Compare him to other characters, since I could recall more said by others. Since I couldn’t find a script for the episode yet, I watched the episode again to see what we all missed, and how his lines stack up to other minor characters, like Carol and Beth. In related news, you may now refer to me as “that person”:

A tally of dialogue for (from the top) T-Dog (IronE Singleton), Beth (Emily Kinney) and Carol (Melissa Suzanne McBride) in “The Walking Dead.”

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The Racialicious Review Of New York Comic-Con

By Guest Contributor Kendra James

Before we get to criticisms, let’s start on a positive note: Overall, I loved attending New York Comic Con this past weekend. Entrenched in one giant convention center with my fellow geeks, I was mostly able to ignore the fact that most of us had no way to contact the outside world…or the friends we got separated from in the massive crowds.

Waiting in line for panels was actually the best way to escape the crowds at NYCC which seemed to take over all of midtown Manhattan (I was nearly hit by a van on 10th Ave driven by what looked like Daenerys and Spider-Man) and, as suspected, Saturday’s panels proved most exciting. Here’s a brief wrap up of two major panels and some general NYCC news and observations for those who weren’t able to attend:

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The Racialicious Preview For New York Comic Con 2012

By Guest Contributor Kendra James

Entrance to New York Comic Con. Via Collider.com

Okay, so there’s not going to be anything Avengers-sized at this year’s New York Comic Con. That said, I’m still thrilled to be spending the weekend down at the Javits Center on behalf of The R. I’ll be on site Thursday through Sunday covering panels, celebrity sightings, and other general Con-ness. There aren’t as many panels as we had back at this summer’s SDCC, but the way I see it that just makes it easier to hit up more great stuff!

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Race + Comics: A Good Conversation With A Creator

Courtesy: DC Comics.

By Arturo R. García

Longtime readers will remember the infamous Twitter discussion between Son of Baldwin and Marvel Comics editor Tom Breevort, where Breevort proceeded to demonstrate how limited the comics industry’s thinking can be when it comes to race.

Not that things have gotten markedly better all of a sudden, but it was pleasant to have a good conversation on the subject vis-a-vis DC Comics’ Superman last night with one of the more notable writers in the industry, Mark Waid, who tackled the character in the Superman: Birthright miniseries, and more recently has earned praise for his work on titles like Irredeemable, Insufferable and Marvel’s Daredevil.

I put together a Storify for the chat, which can be seen under the cut. One note, however: the discussion centers around the representations of the character prior to DC’s reboot last year. So, no short cape and jeans talk here.
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This Show Was Supposed To Be A Gift: Teen Wolf + Race

By Guest Contributor Kendra James

l-r: Stiles (Dylan O’Brien), Scott (Tyler Posey), Allison (Crystal Reed) and Derek (Tyler Hoechlin)

I never wanted to write about MTV’s Teen Wolf on the R. I tried so hard to avoid writing about it that, until this point, I’ve ignored that one time one of the lead actors got caught in blackface, a season and a half worth of problematic characters of color, and the question of whitewashed heroes. This show was supposed to be lighthearted fun peppered with beautiful abdominal muscles.

Unfortunately, that changed in the course of hours one night when Jeff Davis, the show’s creator, started a Tumblr, dedicated his inaugural post to the topic of race of the show, received over 1,000 notes on said post, and then deleted everything altogether when his opinions on race and diversity were not taken well by a PoC and social justice-themed audiences.

It’s the classic case of another well-meaning white male who forgot to check his white privilege at the door.
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Frustrations Of An Asian American Whedonite

By Guest Contributor Michael Le, cross-posted from Racebending

(l-r) Nathan Fillion, Joss Whedon and Summer Glau at San Diego Comic-Con. Courtesy: Entertainment Weekly.

Equality is not a concept. It’s not something we should be striving for. It’s a necessity. Equality is like gravity. We need it to stand on this earth as men and women, and the misogyny that is in every culture is not a true part of the human condition. It is life out of balance, and that imbalance is sucking something out of the soul of every man and woman who’s confronted with it. We need equality. Kinda now.

- Joss Whedon, Equality Now tribute address

Let me preface this piece with the following:

I’ve been a fan of Joss Whedon for many, many years. I’ve seen every episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer more times than I’d care to admit. I have the complete Angel 30-disc DVD box set. I have two signed copies of Dollhouse S1 on Blu-ray (one to watch and one to keep). My girlfriend recorded her own versions of the music from Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog and I have my very own copy of Titan AE.

And, of course, I’m also a huge fan of a little show called Firefly.
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The Racialicious Guide To San Diego Comic-Con 2012, Part 2

SATURDAY
11:30 a.m.: Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained
As of Wednesday night there was some confusion as to whether Tarantino would be making it to this panel, but SDCC has advertised that the cast will be there, at least. Hall H.

12 p.m.: Shonen Jump Alpha
The weekly anime magazine brings in editor-in-chief Yoshihisa Heishi and others to talk about new titles and trends in the manga scene. Room 7AB.

1 p.m.: CBLDF: The Fight To Defend Manga
In 2010, Ryan Matheson was detained by Canadian customs and charged with importing child pornography after authorities went through the manga collection on his laptop. The charges against him were dropped after the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund took his case. Room 11AB.

1 p.m.: Northstar
Sure to be one of the more interesting panel offerings from Marvel, with the character getting married in the pages of Uncanny X-Men. And this is a great occasion, no doubt. Room 25ABC.

1:30 p.m.: 30th Anniversary of Love and Rockets
This 90-minute panel will give co-creators Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez, along with Fantagraphic Books co-publisher Gary Groth, more time to delve into the impact and the creative process behind their long-running indie classic. Room 24ABC.

2 p.m.: Spotlight on Morrie Turner
Nearly 50 years after its debut, Turner’s comic strip Wee Pals continues to be seen in more than 100 daily newspapers. Here Turner will share his story alongside host Keith Knight. Room 4.

5 p.m.: Comics of the African Diaspora
Focusing on “popular but obscure comic-book characters and creators,” the line-up here is interesting. Actress Robin Givens will moderate a panel consisting of Underworld co-creator Kevin Grevioux, Precious director Lee Daniels, Black Comix creator and co-author John Jennings, and Jennings’ collaborator Damian Duffy, who was his co-curator for Other Heroes: African American Comics Creators, Characters, and Archetypes, which began as an art exhibit at Jackson State University. Room 4.

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