Category Archives: casting

Doctor Who Moves Backwards In Time

By Arturo R. García

Peter Capaldi addresses his casting as the Twelfth Doctor in “Doctor Who.” Image via Mashable.

As jarring as it was to see Doctor Who get the kind of drawn-out prime-time infomercial special reserved for reality show winners, the confirmation that Peter Capaldi got the nod to play the Twelfth Doctor is also striking, for a number of reasons — many of which, it should be mentioned, have less to do with Capaldi than with the program itself.

Make no mistake: Capaldi will emerge as a capable, perhaps superlative, lead for the show. But it’s fair to worry whether he was the right person for the job, or just the one best tailored for showrunner Steven Moffat.
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Quoted: Ladies Sing the Blues, White Washing + The Sapphires

The DVD cover for the US release of The Sapphires, a sort of Australian Dreamgirls. But, who were the actual stars of this movie and were they… blue?

O’Dowd’s image is front and centre, in full colour, while the women – played by Deborah RaMailman, Jessica Mauboy, Shari Sebbens and Miranda Tapsell – provide a muted blue-toned backdrop.

London-based American blogger MaryAnn Johanson wrote on her site flickfilosopher.com on Tuesday that the artwork “is a problem”, suggesting Anchor Bay had both “dick-washed and whitewashed The Sapphires”.

“The women are Aborigines,” she wrote. “They are black black black black blackety-black black. Not blue. Oh, and they’re women.”

The post was read by 24-year-old Melbourne climate change activist Lucy Manne, who started a petition on change.org to try to convince Anchor Bay to change the artwork.

“This is a film about four Aboriginal women who battle against sexism and racism in the 1960s. Now we’ve got a DVD cover that is both sexist and racist – it’s the antithesis of what the film is about,” Ms Manne told Fairfax on Friday.

She hopes to convince the distributor to apologise and to change the artwork before next week’s release, or at least to issue it with alternative artwork soon after.

Her petition went live about 7pm on Thursday and by 6pm Friday had attracted 700 supporters. Chris O’Dowd was not among them, but the actor whose star is very much on the rise thanks to the commercial success of Bridesmaids has already made his feelings clear.

Asked his view of the artwork on Wednesday by Australian writer and filmmaker Briony Kidd via twitter, he responded “yup, that’s pretty vile. Certainly not my choice”.

– “Furore Over ‘Sexist, Racist’ Saphires DVD Cover for US Release,” by Karl Quinn via, The Age

 

Wrap Up: The Five Things I Learned At SDCC 2013

By Kendra James

 San Diego Comic Con was overwhelming and not for the faint hearted, but also one of the most unique experiences of geekdom I’ve ever had. After taking a week to recover I wanted share a few highs and lows, insights and lessons learned from a first time SDCC attendee. 

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Missing In Lawndale: The Daria Spoof Trailer’s Near-Total Whitewashing

By Arturo R. García

So late last week, this fake trailer for a live-action Daria movie started going around online:

The premise, which brings the eponymous anti-heroine back to Lawndale for her high-school reunion, is clever. And the casting of Aubrey Plaza is not only a great comedic fit, but it would be another great spotlight for her as a biracial actress in a lead role; if it were to come to pass, it wouldn’t be a bad follow-up at all to her work in The To-Do List.

But, while the trailer does maximize its time in showing us updated versions of Daria, Jane Lane, Daria’s family and representatives of the student body and town Daria was so glad to leave behind, Tanya at Geekquality noted the first glaring absence: no sign of Jodie Landon.
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Table For Two: Pacific Rim

By Arturo R. García & Kendra James

(L-R) Raleigh (Charlie Hunnam) and Mako (Rinku Kikuchi) team up to save humanity from an extraterrestrial scourge in “Pacific Rim.”

Pacific Rim was introduced as an oddity and emerged as even more of one, but in a good way.

While the film was promoted as an homage to the Japanese Kaiju films of old (even outright integrating the term into the story), what audiences actually got was a movie that owed as much to anime classics like Neon Genesis Evangelion as it did to monster smash-’em-ups. And even more surprisingly, one that managed to use those tropes in a thoughtful, downright progressive fashion (albeit while using some wonky dialogue) without skimping on the action the trailer promised us.

Which makes it doubly disconcerting that the movie couldn’t even win its opening weekend at the U.S. box office, finishing second to, of all things, Grown Ups 2. Luckily, the movie’s doing well enough internationally that there’s already talk of a sequel.

But is it worth that kind of effort? Our intrepid reviewers suit up and tackle these questions under the cut. Heavy Spoilers from this point on.
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Table For Two: Man Of Steel

Hosted by Arturo R. García and Kendra James

Henry Cavill as Superman in “Man of Steel.” Image via filmofilia.com

It’s not that surprising that the latest Superman movie, Man of Steel, had a, well, super opening weekend. With the hopes of fans of not just this franchise but an eventual Justice League movie for DC Entertainment to assemble, the collaboration between Batman producer Christopher Nolan, writer David Goyer and director Zack Snyder had to deliver, and well.

And it did, financially. Critically? That’s another matter entirely. When outlets like Newsarama, which are usually DC-friendly, give the film a 3 out of 10, that points to how split the opinions have been on this movie.

Racialicious is no different, as our panelists came out of their respective screenings feeling differently about it. Heavy spoilers under the cut.

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The Racialcious Entertainment Roundup: June 3-9

By Kendra James

A few weeks back I suggested that you might want to catch up on BBC 1’s Luther, starring Idris Elba and Ruth Wilson, before the premiere of the show’s third series in July. This week brought us the first trailer for the summer season (above), so I repeat: Watch Luther. We’re a country with eighteen thousand different Law and Orders, a million CSIs, and nine seasons of Criminal Minds. This show should be way more mainstream than it is.

(Video heavy under the cut this week, folks, so hold onto your computers!)

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Race + Theatre: On The Tony Awards 2013

Theatre Diversity Gap infographic

• On New York City stages during the 2011–2012 season, African American actors were cast in 16% of all roles, Latino actors in 3%, Asian American actors in 3%, and other minorities comprised 1%. Caucasian actors filled 77% of all roles. Caucasians continue to be the only ethnicity to over-represent compared to their respective population size in New York City or the Tri-State area.

• The percentage of minority actors rose to 23% this past year, a 2% increase from the year prior. While a significant jump, this level is fairly consistent with levels of minority representation which have consistently remained within the low twenty percent range. The last time representation hit 23% was during the 2007/08 season.

• African American actors increased by 2% compared to last season.

• Latino actors remained at 3% for the third straight year in a row.

• Asian American actors increased slightly from 2% to 3% this past season.

• Only 10% of all roles played by minority actors were non-traditionally cast. This remains the same as last season.

• African Americans were far more likely than any other minority to be cast in roles which were not defined by their race.

• For the second year in a row, the not-for-profit sector lagged far behind the commercial sector when it came to hiring minorities. The opposite was true in the four years preceding this shift, where actors of color were once more likely to find employment within the not-for-profit sector. While total number of minority actors in this sector increased by 3% from 19% the year prior, this is still far below the industry average and is the second year in a row that minority employment among the not-for-profit companies fell below 20%.

• This past season, African Americans and Latinos on non-profit stages increased 1% and 2%, respectively. Asian American actors, however, have been at their lowest point, 2%, for three years in a row now. This is a substantial drop from where they were six and five years ago (4% and 7%, respectively).

“Where’s The Diversity? The Tony Awards Look In The Mirror” by Jason Low of LeeandLow.com, June 6, 2013

Read the full report from the Asian American Performers Action Coalition here. We have the list of last night’s individual winners (performers) of color under the cut. Black actors and actresses, at least, had a good showing in top categories, but four wins can’t negate the facts.

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