Category Archives: announcements

Transgender Studies Quarterly Plans To Kick Ass With The Help Of Kickstarter–And You

By Andrea Plaid

More info from their Kickstarter page:

Transgender Studies has far-reaching implications across many academic disciplines, including not only gender and women’s studies, sexuality studies, and LGBT Studies, but also social sciences, health, art, cultural studies, and many other broadly defined fields. The development of transgender studies also makes a politically significant intervention into the lives of trans community members with tremendous unmet needs, by changing what and how we know about transgender issues.

This project began in 2008, when we were invited to co-edit a special transgender studies edition of Women’s Studies Quarterly. We received more than two hundred submissions for publication, yet we could only publish twelve of them. We knew then that it was time for transgender studies to have its own high-profile publications venue. Five years later, there is still no place to accommodate the kind of conversation we want to foster on transgender issues. Your support right now could change that.

You have the opportunity to be part of this historic moment. Once the journal is launched in April 2014, subscriptions will eventually cover the cost of publication. To subsidize the cost of publishing the journal, we need to raise at least $100,000 in start-up funds. We’re already more than halfway to our goal, and would now like to invite you to invest in the next stage in the development of transgender studies, by helping us complete our fundraising for launching TSQ. Your support will help us create a first-rate platform for publishing peer-reviewed transgender-related scholarship—something that can only benefit the entire field of gender and sexuality studies.

There’s 13 days left to donate, so please kick in what you can and spread the word!

Call For Submissions: ¿Y Tu Abuela, Donde Está?: Multi-dimensional Afro-Latina/o Identities In The 21st Century

The Migration of Afro-Latin@s. Via williamsbsu.wordpress.com

The Migration of Afro-Latin@s. Via williamsbsu.wordpress.com

“The Black and White Dialogue on race and culture in the United States has consistently ignored the existence of more than 150 million people of African ancestry in the other Americas. The total absence of Afro-Latinas/os from the Caribbean Mexico, Central America and South America in the consciousness of the national discourse in the United States, including in institutions that educate and inform the civil society of the nation, contributes to the absolute disregard of the presence and realities of African Diasporic communities within the U.S. national territory and aboard. This lack of recognition and omission of the history, contributions and lives of more than 150 million people of African ancestry, many of whom reside here in the United States renders their contributions and lives irrelevant.”   

–Dr. Marta Moreno Vega, Women Warriors of the Afro-Latina Diaspora, “Afro-Boricua: Nuyorican de Pura Cepa,” page 75

“Of the estimated 11 million enslaved Africans brought to the New World from the late 1400s to the 1860s, most were taken to Latin America and the Caribbean, with only some 645,000 landing in the United States. “So when you’re talking about blackness, you’re really talking about Latin America.”

Miriam Jimenez Roman

Context:

“¿Y Tu Abuela, Donde Está?: Multi-dimensional Afro-Latina/o Identities in the 21st Century” is an exhibition examining Afro-Latino identity and culture in a contemporary context. The title is appropriated from a popular phrase within the Spanish-speaking Latin American community that examines the racial and cultural heritage of people of African descent. Sometimes used as a biting remark towards Latinos who elect to identify racially and culturally as something other than “Black” or of African descent, the phrase alludes to the idea of individuals literally hiding their background by keeping their grandmother, presumably a dark-complexioned woman, in the back part of their homes where no one can see her. However, some Latinos have also appropriated the adage to proudly profess their African heritage. As North America’s population shifts and the rate of Latin Americans grows in the United States, there has been an increase in interest of the historical, cultural, cosmological and political narratives of Latina/os of African descent and those who racially identify as “Black.” But most importantly, there has also been a push by Afro-Latina/os for the acknowledgement of the existence of a population of millions of people of African descent living outside the U.S. in Mexico, Central and South America and the Caribbean. The term “Afro-Latino” has also given rise to nuanced conversations about non-Spanish speaking Latin Americans from places such as Brasil and the Francophone Caribbean. CCCADI has been at the forefront of conversations about Afro-Latinos since its founding by Dr. Marta Moreno Vega, an Afro-Puerto Rican scholar, for the past three decades. As an institution, CCCADI is committed to delving deeper into this complex conversation to examine where Afro-Latina/os are today as individuals and as a community, particularly as younger generations boldly proclaim their Latino AND African identities.

HOW TO SUBMIT

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Huffington Post Live: Simplifying Emancipation

Hey All –

Racialicious is still on break, but I was on Huffington Post Live with Janell Ross (HuffPost Black Voices and Latino Voices Senior Reporter), Professor Jelani Cobb (Director of the Institute of African American Studies at the University of Connecticut) and William Ferris (Professor of History and Folklore at University of North Carolina).

We discussed Ross’s article “America’s Understanding of Emancipation Proclamation On Its 150th Anniversary Too Simple For Country’s Own Good.” Our friend Ahmed Shihab-Eldin moderated the discussion.

Site Break + Site Is Down!

Hello Racializens!

Some of you have noticed the technical difficulties happening on the site–we’re working to fix it, but with the holiday ridiculousness, it’s been slow-going. We were also planning to make an announcement that Racialicious is on vacation until January 7th. (Though, if we can get the site fixed, there will be some Easter eggs on the 1st – 7th.)

We will see you in the New Year!

Make a wish,

Team Racialicious

Racialicious And Maysles Cinema Present The Loving Story

Image via blackfilm.com.

Perhaps Shonda Rimes referred to the wrong interracial relationship in last week’s Scandal. For the sexual/romantic agency–as problematic as it is–that both Olivia Pope and President Fitz Grant do exercise, they’re probably closer to the Richard and Mildred Loving than Sally Hemmings and Thomas Jefferson.

If you’re in the New York City area, please join the post-showing chat about the new documentary, The Loving Story, on the couple and their Supreme Court case this Sunday, December 16, at Maysles Cinema, located at 343 Malcolm X Blvd./Lenox Ave (between 127th and 128th Streets). The movie starts at 7:30PM; the discussion, moderated by the R’s Associate Editor Andrea Plaid (who, in full disclosure, also works as the Maysles Institute’s Social Media Fellow), will start about 8:45PM.

This is what critics say about the film…

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An African Election: Premiere Night!

The public-media premiere for Jarreth Merz’s An African Election is finally here! So, what’s happening tonight?

As you may know, we’re really hyped about the people WGBH, Boston’s public TV station–in collaboration with Racialicious and the National Black Programming Consortium‘s (NBPC) AfroPoP.TV–scheduled to appear in-studio and on Skype to have a roundtable discussion about the  documentary and the issues regarding voting and democracy in both Ghana and the US:

That kicks off at 8PM EDT on PBS’ WORLD channel. We encourage you, Racializens, be a part of the Twitter discussion that’ll take place at the beginning of the panel. You just might have your pithy question or comment read on the air.

Then, at 8:30PM, the film rolls, and so does the live-tweeting! Please feel free to join the R (@racialicious) and (NBPC (@BLKPublicMedia) and our guest tweeters:

The hashtags for tonight are #AfricanElection and #AfroPoPTV.

See you in eight hours!

Related:

An African Election Podcast: Latoya Peterson with Barak Hoffman

An African Election Podcast: Latoya Peterson with Frankie Edozien

Women To Watch In Ghanaian Politics [An African Election]

An African Election: What American Women Can Learn From Ghanaian Feminists 

An African Election Tweet-Up: Ghanaian Women And The 2008 Election With Nana Darkoa Sekyiamah

An African Election: African Feminisms With Minna Salami and Yaba Blay

What Votes Count? On Voter Fraud And Intimidation [An African Election]

The Right To Information: A Building Block Of Democracy [An African Election]

An African Election: Pan-Africanism and Ghana’s 2008 Election With Dr. James Peterson

An African Election: A 21st-Century Ghanaian Politics Primer With Dr. Benjamin Talton

An African Election‘s Jarreth Merz On African Stereotypes And Ghanaian Politics

An African Election Takes Over Racialicious

 

Speaking: Kenyon College *Tonight*, Ohio State, Smith College

Slide from the talk, taken from the “Top of the World” music video.

I’m knee-deep into the Knight Fellowship (more on that in October) so I’ve been scarce around here lately. But I did want to post about some upcoming events, since I love meeting Racializens in the world.

TONIGHT, 7 PM
Kenyon College
Higley Hall
101 East Brooklyn St
Gambier, OH 43022

Presenting “From Rape Culture to Pop Culture” as part of their Take Back the Night Programming. After-chat at the Cozier Center.

This is a version of the talk I summarized in “Some Notes on Rape Culture.

October 4, 4 PM

Wexner Center for the Arts
Ohio State
1871 North High Street
Columbus, OH 43201

Panelist during the Pop Impact Symposium. Description here:

How do feminist, queer, and critical race theories “trickle down” into the creation of popular culture? Entertainment industry insiders discuss how their educational experiences and critical concepts are introduced and circulate in their work. Cultural critic and digital media consultant Latoya Peterson (Racialicious) and comedian and writer Angela V. Shelton (Frangela) talk with moderator Kimberly Springer from Ohio State’s Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

Cosponsored by Ohio State’s Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies with support from Arts & Humanities.

November 8

Smith College
Northampton, MA 01063

I’m the keynote speaker for Otelia Cromwell Day, and will presenting a talk and a workshop, loosely structured around the situation that led to the excellent Pearls and Cashmere campaign.

Keynote–Against Pearl Clutching: Rebels, Renegades, and Critical Resistance

A look at social rebellion and historical revision through the lens of pop culture. Pearls and Cashmere, campus racism, and the politics of exclusion will be discussed.

Workshop–Bridging the Gaps: Solidarity Beyond Clichés

This workshop will focus on reading, journaling, and partner exercises designed to explore the difficulties in creating broadly inclusive spaces and creating frameworks and language that will allow for the formation of lasting coalitions.