Category Archives: An African Election

An African Election: African Feminisms With Minna Salami And Yaba Blay

Ask a simple question, get incredible answers.

That’s what happened during yesterday’s tweet-up when the R and National Black Programming Consortium‘s AfroPoP.TV asked African feminist activist/scholars Minna Salami (a.k.a @MsAfropolitan) and Yaba Blay (a.k.a. @fiyawata) to offer their Twitterfied thoughts on African feminisms and their influence in Ghanaian policies and politics. How feminism and gender play out in Ghana’s 2008 election is a question that is touched on in Jarreth Merz’s documentary, An African Election.

During the lively discussion with our fantastic guest tweeters, the R asked them about how the race is constructed in African feminisms versus how it’s constructed in Western, specifically US, Black feminism/womanism. Their answers are after the jump.

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An African Election Tweet-Up: African Feminism With @MsAfropolitan And @fiyawata

What is African, specifically Ghanaian, feminism?

What role did feminism and women’s right in Ghana’s 2008 election and beyond?

What can western feminism learn from African feminism?

Racialicious and National Black Programming Consortium‘s AfroPoP.TV are so thrilled to have Minna Salami (a.k.a. @MsAfropolitan) and Yaba Blay (a.k.a. @fiyawata) as the guests for tomorrow’s tweet-up to talk about these and other questions related to African feminism! We’ll kick off the discussion on Twitter at 11AM EDT with the hashtag #AfricanElection.

So, please join us for our tweetversation tomorrow!

Related:

What Votes Count? On Voter Fraud And Intimidation [An African Election]

The Right To Information: A Building Block Of Democracy

An African Election: Pan-Africanism and Ghana’s 2008 Election With Dr. James Peterson

An African Election: A 21st-Century Ghanaian Politics Primer With Dr. Benjamin Talton

An African Election‘s Jarreth Merz On African Stereotypes And Ghanaian Politics

An African Election Takes Over Racialicious

An African Election: Two Weeks ‘Til Premiere, One Week ‘Til Pre-Screening

 

We are so thrilled that Racializens are getting into what we and National Black Consortium’s (NBPC) AfroPoP.TV are posting in preparation for the public-media premiere of Jarreth Merz’s An African Election coming up two weeks on PBS’ WORLD channel! We’ll keep you informed about more social-media happenings, like podcasts, Google hangouts and, yes, more tweet-ups. (P.S. You’ll also see some interesting quotes from the film on Racialicious’ and NBPC’s Twitter timelines.)

Racialicious and AfroPOP.TV are also hosting a pre-screening of An African Election at Maysles Cinema, located in Harlem, NYC, on Tuesday, September 25 (time to be announced). We’ll definitely give you the deets about this exciting event!

If your looking for more about the documentary, please check out the website. Also, please check out NBPC‘s and AfroPOP.TV‘s Facebook pages.

Related:
What Votes Count? On Voter Fraud And Intimidation [An African Election]

An African Election: Pan-Africanism and Ghana’s 2008 Election With Dr. James Peterson

An African Election: A 21st-Century Ghanaian Politics Primer With Dr. Benjamin Talton

The Right To Information: A Building Block Of Democracy

An African Election‘s Jarreth Merz On African Stereotypes And Ghanaian Politics

An African Election Takes Over Racialicious

 

What Votes Count? On Voter Fraud And Intimidation [An African Election]

It all came down to Tain. In An African Election, the results of the 2008 were decided based on multiple run-off votes. Each time, the paper ballots were painstakingly counted and verified, and there was much discussion about not disenfranchising the elderly and those who did not have formal identification.

But times have changed. Continue reading

An African Election: Pan-Africanism and Ghana’s 2008 Election

With eighteen more days left before the public-media premiere of Jarreth Merz’s An African Election, the R and National Black Programming’s AfroPOP.TV had a wonderful tweetversation this past Wednesday about the philosophy of Pan-Africanism, which is the founding principle of Ghana’s politics. We invited Dr. James Peterson, who’s Director of Africana Studies and an associate professor of English at Lehigh University and was so kind to guest-tweet. Suffice to say, we had a rollickingly fun, late-evening chat not only about the tenets of Pan-Africanism, but also its limitations, Latinidad, and gender politics, thanks to all of you Racializens who joined in!

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The Right to Information: A Building Block of Democracy [An African Election]

What does it mean when citizens have the right to information? For a democracy to function, citizens must be able to make informed decisions, both in their daily lives as well as at the ballot box. As Ghana approaches its election season, the debates around transparency and access are at an all time high — but none is more watched than the Right to Information Bill (the RTI for short).

Democracy is a very simple concept with a very complicated execution. The creation and continuation of democracy is normally messy – entrusting the people to be informed and active participants in a society is a challenge for nations much further along in their histories. Between decolonization, military coups, and transitioning to Democracy, Ghana finds itself on the forefront of defining a new way toward democracy.
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An African Election Tweet-Up: Pan-Africanism And Ghana’s 2008 Election

Pan-Africanism has such a hold on quite a few progressive people’s imaginations, but why and, more specifically, how did it play out in the 2008 election of where that philosophy originated, Ghana, as captured in Jarreth Merz’s documentary, An African Election?

Racialicious and the National Black Programming Consortium touched on it in our last tweet-up with Temple University’s Dr. Benjamin Talton. This week, we’ll do an extended tweetersation about Pan-Africanism and Ghana with Dr. James Peterson, who’s the director of Africana Studies and is an associate professor of English at Lehigh University (and a friend of the R).

So, check us out out on Twitter tomorrow night at 9PM ET and join the conversation!

Related Posts:

An African Election‘s Jarreth Merz On African Stereotypes And Ghanaian Politics

An African Election Takes Over Racialicious

An African Election on Twitter

An African Election: A 21st-Century Ghanaian Politics Primer With Dr. Benjamin Talton

As some of you may have read on our Twitter timeline, we at the R and National Black Programming Consortium had a great time with Dr. Benjamin Talton, who teaches Ghanaian history and politics at Temple University. He took time between classes to give a quick lesson on the politics captured in Jarreth Merz’s An African Election.

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