All posts by Racialicious Team

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Last Call For The Racialicious SDCC Creators Of Color Round-up

If you missed our first call, don’t sweat — we’re still looking to hear from any creators of color heading to San Diego Comic-Con next week.

To recap: If you’re going to be an exhibitor or presenter during the convention, or know someone who is, drop us a line in the comment thread here, or at team@racialicious.com and we’ll boost the signal as part of our SDCC preview, which will also our looks at the programming. Just let us know where to find you both at the event and online.

Also, stick around during the con, as Kendra & Arturo bring you live-tweets and images throughout the weekend!

Top image by Kevin Dooley via Flickr Creative Commons

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Watch It Again: President Obama’s Eulogy For Clementa Pinckney

Transcript courtesy http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2015/06/26/transcript-obama-delivers-eulogy-for-charleston-pastor-the-rev-clementa-pinckney/

Giving all praise and honor to God.

The Bible calls us to hope, to persevere and have faith in things not seen. They were still living by faith when they died, the scripture tells us.

They did not receive the things promised. They only saw them and welcomed them from a distance, admitting that they were foreigners and strangers on earth.

We are here today to remember a man of God who lived by faith, a man who believed in things not seen, a man who believed there were better days ahead off in the distance, a man of service, who persevered knowing full-well he would not receive all those things he was promised, because he believed his efforts would deliver a better life for those who followed, to Jennifer, his beloved wife, Eliana and Malana, his beautiful, wonderful daughters, to the Mother Emanuel family and the people of Charleston, the people of South Carolina.
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SDCC First Call: Are You A POC Creator Going to San Diego Comic-Con?

With less than a month until San Diego Comic-Con, we’d like to get the ball rolling on our annual coverage by promoting creators of color throughout the convention.

If you’re going to be an exhibitor or presenter during the convention, or know someone who is, drop us a line in the comment thread here, or at team@racialicious.com and we’ll boost the signal in our SDCC preview posts, including our looks at the programming and special SDCC Files post telling fans where to find you on the floor and online.

We’ll put up one more call for creators in a couple of weeks, but why wait? Let’s start getting the word out now!

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Quoted: Tauriq Moosa on Race and Witcher 3

By creating digital representations of people who aren’t white, it indicates a culture and industry who view us as people. It counters the status quo that dehumanizes us by erasing us or casting us as a non-human. We want to be seen as people, too. There’s little more to it, for me.

But seeing angry responses to this simple request speaks volumes about the kind of culture we’re creating by not diversifying races, genders and so on. Consider: In Witcher 3, all humans are white and every other being is non-human. That’s not exactly friendly or inclusive of people of color. A game can include diverse number of monsters, but not a diverse number of skin colours or races for humans?

And then we see panic and anger when white gamers may be asked to play as people of color in Rust. The double standard is rarely addressed. Being white is apolitical, being a person of color, even simply by existing, is threatening to some players.

Read the rest at Polygon.

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Memorial Day: Remembering Soldiers of Color [The Throwback]

In honor of the U.S. celebrating Memorial Day today, we are reprinting this 2012 piece featuring veterans from many of our communities

We’ll begin with a video that was shown here in San Diego earlier this year, at a celebration of the Congressional Gold Medal awarded two years ago to the 100th Infantry Battalion and the 442nd Regimental Combat Team and and U.S. Military Intelligence Service (MIS). The unit, composed mostly of Japanese-Americans, would see heavy action during World War II in Europe, and would go on to produce 21 Medal of Honor recipients. This unit’s exploits were chronicled in fictional form in the film Only The Brave, the trailer of which can be seen here.

[Note: One video under the cut auto-plays, but is SFW.]
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Mea Culpa: Let’s Try This Again…

by The Racialicious Team

Yeah, we know. You can say it– we won’t be insulted: It’s been a pretty quiet few months here at Racialicious. And by ‘quiet’ we really mean dead aside from the occasional burst of entertainment driven genius from our managing editor, Arturo Garcia. Unfortunately (or, fortunately, if you like things like paying rent and somehow living in three major cities) all of us, Latoya, Kendra, and Arturo, have full time day jobs in various fields and didn’t have the time to dedicate to daily posting on The R like we’d had in the past. So while Latoya’s been killing it at Fusion, bringing us things like this mental map with Carl Jones, while Art’s been writing daily at Raw Story, and while Kendra’s been making stupid youtube videos with her college friends, Racialicious has laid dormant.

In an effort to change that –starting with Monday’s post on Netflix’s Daredevil (spoiler alert)– Kendra and Art are happy to welcome Tope Fadiran on board as our new contributing and submissions editor. Tope (@graceishuman) has joined us before for chats on Scandal and protecting white kids from history, and can be found on other corners of the internet like Time.com  or her own blog Are Women Human. Your submissions should still go to team@racialicious.com, but for the most part you’ll now be hearing back from Tope. You’re all in great hands.

You’ll notice that I said ‘your submissions’. First, an apology to those who have been diligently emailing us over the past 2-3 months. As mentioned above, the Racialicious Team has been pretty busy with our daily lives and our response and edit rate has been deplorable. We love our readers and our contributors too much to let this go by without acknowledgement and a huge mea culpa. We’re sorry and we’re going to do better.

With Tope jumping aboard we are happy to announce that we are actively accepting, editing, and posting submissions. Again. You’re going to want to check out our submission guidelines (here) before you hit send, but rest assured you’ll hear back from the team.

We’re looking forward to spending the summer reconnecting with our readers, starting with a trip out to C2E2 in Chicago this weekend with Kendra. A con preview post will be up tomorrow, and we’ll be back on a regular posting schedule starting in May– more details to come! In the meantime, let’s all make Tope feel welcome with a hearty applause and a  flood of incoming submissions.

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The Racialicious Live-Tweet For The 2015 Oscars

If you skipped last night’s ceremony, we certainly don’t blame you. But, Kendra and Arturo were live-snarking throughout the night, and you can catch their recap of the highs and awkward lows under the cut.

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Endangered by the Moving Image: The Criminalization of Black and Brown Bodies [Panel]

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This looks amazing, happening in NYC on February 1st at the Museum of the Moving Image:

Do ​media depictions of African Americans influence the way they are treated by the police, the criminal justice system, and by society at large? In the wake of the deaths of Michael Brown in Ferguson and Eric Garner in Staten Island, protests have once again raised questions about the criminalization of the black image on screen. This program will bring together a group of leading African-American cultural commentators to look at the history of how African Americans are represented in film and television, beginning with D.W. Griffith’s The Birth of a Nation.

Panelists include:

William Jelani Cobb, author of The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama and the Paradox of Progress, is the director of the Africana Studies Institute, University of Connecticut, and a frequent contributor to The New Yorker and commentator for National Public Radio.

Mia Mask, film professor at Vassar College, is the co-editor of the recent books Poitier Revisited: Reconsidering a Black Icon in the Obama Age, and Black American Cinema Reconsidered. She is the author of Divas on Screen: Black Women in American Film.

Greg Tate is a writer, musician, and producer whose writing has focused on African-American music and culture. He was a long-time staff writer for The Village Voice and his books include Flyboy in the Buttermilk: Essays on Contemporary America and Everything but the Burden.

Tickets: $12 ($9 for senior citizens and students / free for members at the Film Lover level and above). Order tickets online.

More information here.