All posts by Andrea

Meanwhile, On TumblR: Interrupting Fuckery With Asian American Princesses

By Andrea Plaid

Considering last week’s foolishness, no thanks to Day Above Ground’s “Asian Girlz,” we need some pop-culture interruptions around here–and our anti-racism-and-pop-culture compatriots at Racebending helped out.

This week, we reblogged their post featuring the digital photography of Kim Navoa and Donnie, who reimagined the Disney Princesses as Asian American women. Check out the great results:

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Friday WTF? “Asian Girlz” Pisses Folks Off–And Rightfully So

By Andrea Plaid

Recall the previous post about Guante’s vid and its takeaway about being PC is really about not being a jackass. Well, this next pop cultural item is exactly why political correctness came into being in the first place.

Longtime Racialicious homie Angry Asian Man tweeted this:

Asian Girlz Tweet 5The shit he’s referring to is the latest anti-Asian vid called “Asian Girlz” by some band called Day Above Ground. Well, one person didn’t listen…

Asian Girlz Tweet 1Sis, I learned from your example. I listened and didn’t watch, but I did try to read the lyrics to understand why AAM said what he said. All I’m going to say is prepare yourselves for gross amounts of fuckery.

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Meanwhile On TumblR: PoCs and Punk Rock’s Real History

By Andrea Plaid

Well, I’m back from the subaltern world of moviemaking–at least that’s how it felt–and here to report about the latest from Tumblr’s blue backend fields.

This week, we reblogged a great comic from Bitch’s Suzy X from Tumblring cohort Sean Padilla. In it, Suzy describes being a punk rocker of color in din of racism–and still finding a home in that scene.

Suzy X 1

 

Suzy X 2

 

Suzy X 3

Suzy X 4Suzy X 5

Check out what else we’re into at the R’s Tumblr!

Quoted: Dueling Asian Stereotypes Rise From The SFO Tragedy

SFO Crash

It’s a predictable pattern: Tragedy strikes, and the volume of racism gets loud on the Internet. After Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crash-landed in San Francisco last weekend, leaving two dead and many others injured, some folks thought it was appropriate to resurrect the dated trope that Asians are bad drivers. The pilot flying the plane when it crashed was identified as Lee Gang-guk, according to Korean authorities.

The stereotype that Asians aren’t great behind the wheel isn’t new, of course. I mean, it’s been featured in Family Guy. It has its own special place in the revered Urban Dictionary. It’s entrenched enough that it’s been the focus of multiple studies, which compared crash rates of immigrant drivers with those of native drivers. (One Canadian study from 2011 found that immigrant drivers — the biggest groups of whom were from China and India — actually had fewer accidents than “long-term” drivers.)

What’s confounding, though, is that the whole “Asians are bad drivers” stereotype clashes with another beloved Internet meme: that Asians are good at all the “hard” things, especially things that include math, technology or coordination.

Some folks might ask, Wait! Isn’t a positive stereotype, like the tech-wizard ninja one, actually kind of good? Some folks might also never have been asked to calculate the tip at a restaurant because of their assumed Asian math prowess. (Ahem. I’m just sayin’.)

How can a group be stereotyped in such diametrically opposite ways? If folks are going to say racist things after a fatal tragedy, is it too much to ask that at least the stereotypes be consistent? Because, you know, we can’t possibly be bad drivers and good at All The Things.

But I’d prefer neither.

–Kat Chow, “Dueling Stereotypes: Bad Asian Drivers, Good At Everything,” Code Switch: NPR 7/11/13

Meanwhile, On Tumblr: How To Shut Down A Racist Assumption With Classical Music

By Andrea Plaid

I’m not going to be around the R for the next couple of weeks because I’m shooting an indie flick! (Since I can’t give details due to the production team’s order for a social media blackout, I’ll leave it at 1) I’m one of the supporting actors and 2) I’m having a lot of fun so far, and 3) I’m acting with a Racialicious guest contributor and some fans!) But I’ll leave you with this utter fabulous vid I just laid eyes on, though it’s a classic goody from back in 2012.

Stand-up comedian and Parks & Recreations star Retta gives a rap-hating woman a great lesson on assumptions:

And check out more of the fun at the R’s Tumblr!

Announcement: Yuri Kochiyama: Passion For Justice Screening, Panel Discussion At Maysles Tonight!

By Andrea Plaid

Yuri Kochiyama Passion For Justice poster

When Dr. Brittney Cooper started the #paulawontcookit hashtag during the height of Black Twitter dragging Paula Deen for her controversial comments—and my undergrad college ace Dr. Lisa Huebner Rutchti  tagged me to join in the fun–I contributed

pauladeenwontcookit--Yuri Kochiyama Cornbread

Which, I’m proud to say, met with Dr. Cooper’s approval and made Racialicious guest contributor (and my homie) Sofia Quintero say:

pauladeenwontcookit--Sofia Quintero

Why Kochiyama? She most famously held Malcolm X (who, by that point, changed his name to El Hajj Malik el Shabazz to reflect his pilgrimage to Mecca) while he was dying from assassins’ bullets. She was a member of his Organization of Afro-American Unity. And, in 1977, she joined 29 members of the New York Committee to Free Puerto Rican Nationalists Prisoners, a pro-independence group, as they took over the Statue of Liberty to protest for the return of the island’s sovereignty, ending anti-Puerto Rican discrimination, and freeing Puerto Rican political prisoners. She also became an activist mentor as Asian Americans protested the rampant racism against them that the Vietam War exacerbated as she herself agitated for reparations for the Japanese American who the US government interred during World War II.

And she—who is still alive—is known for much, much more, as the new documentary Yuri Kochiyama: Passion for Justice talks about.

CAAAV: Organizing Asian Communities and Women Make Movies are co-sponsoring a screening and a panel discussion at Maysles Documentary Center in Harlem tonight, starting at 6PM! Some of the panelists include members from Kochiyama’s family and Racialicious Crush alum and guest contributor Scot Nakagawa.  Tickets are $10 (suggested donation), and the proceeds go toward supporting CAAAV’s programs.

For more information and tickets, please check here. And I’ll let you know how the cornbread turns out!