The Racialicious Links Roundup 9.5.13: History, Apps, And Detroit

Lt. Thomas Grosvenor and his black servant Key, by John Trumbull, 1797 or after. Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Conn. Image via The Root.

  • Creator of GhettoTracker.com Surprised by All the “Negative Baggage”” (Gawker)

    “GhettoTracker’s “ghettos” aren’t identified based on mugging statistics or murder rates—or any hard data at all, really. Instead, “ghettos” are determined by the site’s users and delineated by their prejudices. It’s a new, crowd-sourced twist on stop-and-frisk: Just drop a little red dot anywhere you think upstanding folks should stop-and-avoid.”

 

 

  • A Black Man’s Role in American Revolution” (The Root)

    After resigning from the Continental Army, he studied painting in Great Britain with the American expatriate painter Benjamin West. He soon decided to devote his career to documenting the history of the Revolution in pictures, eight of which were to depict the major battles of the war. The Death of General Warren at the Battle of Bunker Hill was painted in London between late 1785 and early 1786.

    In the finished work, Lt. Thomas Grosvenor, the dashing young American officer seen here, stands to the far right. Beside him, a black man holds a musket. Both figures look toward the culmination of the action in the center of the scene. Gen. Joseph Warren, leader of the Revolutionary forces, has just been shot. In the middle ground nearby, British Maj. John Pitcairn, mortally wounded, falls into the arms of his son.