Quoted: Solidarity is For Miley Cyrus

Miley

Image via Groupthink.com.

Here’s the thing: historically, black women have had very little agency over their bodies. From being raped by white slave masters to the ever-enduring stereotype that black women can’t be raped, black women have been told over and over and over again, that their bodies are not their own. By bringing these “homegirls with the big butts” out onto the stage with her and engaging in a one-sided interaction with her ass, (not even her actual person!) Miley has contributed to that rhetoric. She made that woman’s body a literal spectacle to be enjoyed by her legions of loyal fans. Not only was that the only way that Miley interacted with any of the other people onstage with her, but all of her backup dancers were “black women with big butts” as Violet_Baudelaire so astutely pointed out. So not only are black women’s bodies being used as props, but they are also props that are only worthy of interaction if that interaction involves sexualization.

Now some people have said that Miley is only 20, and she’s “just a child” and that she doesn’t understand what she’s doing. But Miley isn’t new to this. Her video for the single wasn’t even the first precursor to this madness. She has been quoted as saying that she explicitly wanted “a black sound” for her new album. She is more than aware of what she’s doing, and has consciously made the choice to dabble in traditionally black aesthetics and sound in order to breakaway from her good girl image and further her career.

— NINJACATE “Solidarity is For Miley Cyrus: The Racial Implications of her VMA Performance” Read the full piece at Groupthink.