The Racialicious Links Roundup 6.26.13: DOMA, Voting Rights, Paula Deen & Signing Wu-Tang

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Photo by Thomas Hawk.

  • DOMA Ruling Clears Path for Binational Couples (Colorlines)

    The rights of gay and lesbian couples to sponsor non-citizen partners for immigration visas became a central area of debate in the ongoing immigration reform deliberations. For several years, Democrats in Congress have introduced stand-alone legislation that would allow U.S. citizens to petition for a green card for their same-sex partners, married or not. That legislation, which gained small Republican support, never made it far, but many hoped that immigration reform would include LGBT rights provisions.

  • How Do You Say Shaolin in Sign Language? (Slate)

    To prepare for the show, Maniatty says she logged more than 100 hours of research on the Beastie Boys, memorizing their lyrics and watching past shows. Her prep work also includes researching dialectal signs to ensure accuracy and authenticity. An Atlanta rapper will use different slang than a Queens one, and ASL speakers from different regions also use different signs, so knowing how a word like guns and brother are signed in a given region is crucial for authenticity.

    Signing a rap show requires more than just literal translation. Maniatty has to describe events, interpret context, and tell a story. Often, she is speaking two languages simultaneously, one with her hands and one with her mouth, as she’ll sometimes rap along with the artists as well. When a rapper recently described a run-in with Tupac, Maniatty rapped along while making the sign for hologram, so deaf fans would know the reference was to Tupac’s holographic cameo at Coachella, not some figment of the rapper’s imagination.

  • So the Voting Rights Act Is Gutted—What Can Protect Minority Voters Now? (The Atlantic)

    So the question is what the heck do those who care about equality and democracy do now? Waiting to fill an appointment until certain justices kick the bucket or decide to retire doesn’t seem like a good strategy. And it’s hard to imagine the current Congress leaping to fix Section 4 of the law, as Chief Justice John Roberts suggested. Fortunately, there are quicker and more promising remedial paths to follow.

  • The Guileless ‘Accidental Racism’ of Paula Deen (The Atlantic)

    Here is everything from Civil War hokum to black friend apologia to blatant racism. And people at a New York Times event are laughing along with it.

    This morning, I showed this video to my wife. My wife is dark-skinned. My wife is from Chicago by way of Covington, Tennessee. The remark sent her right back to childhood. I suspect that the laughter in the crowd was a mix of discomfort, shock and ignorance. The ignorance is willful. We know what we want to know, and forget what discomfits us.

  • EinSC

    “Back then, black folk were such an integral part of our lives,” said
    Deen. “They were like our family, and for that reason we didn’t see
    ourselves as prejudiced.”
    She also called up an employee to join her onstage, noting that Hollis
    Johnson was “as black as this board” — pointing to the dark backdrop
    behind her. “We can’t see you standing in front of that dark board!”
    Deen quipped, drawing laughter from the audience.

    Please, PLEASE tell me there is video of this soon to be aired on the major networks so her nonapology can be further eviscerated!