Quoted: The problem with “Devious Maids” goes far beyond Hollywood

The cast of Devious Maids via Lifetime

 

Six years ago, I had a deal with Lifetime Television to develop my bestselling novel, The Dirty Girls Social Club, as a TV series. It soon became clear that the relationship wasn’t going to work, when two executives insisted that my pilot outline “wasn’t Latin enough,” because it told of middle class, educated American women who happened to be Latina.

“This reads as if it were about me and my friends,” complained one executive in disgust.

I didn’t know how to respond, so I asked her what she’d prefer.

“Why don’t we make the girls debating whether or not to date men in prison? I know that’s what Latinas talk about, just like it’s what black women talk about.”

Right. Because all middle class, college-educated professional women talk about dating prisoners.

In her dreams.

I got out of that deal because of this idiocy, and never looked back.

It is not wrong to be a maid, or even a Latina maid, but there is something very wrong with an American entertainment industry that continually tells Latinas that this is all they are or can ever be.

My grandmother was a maid in Cuba; my biological grandfather was her employer. My father, never claimed by his bio-dad, was a janitor when he first began working in the United States, as a teen immigrant. My father went on to get his PhD, sort of a real-life Good Will Hunting, and became a leading sociologist. He raised me to believe in myself and my voice; I went to Columbia, and I’m a bestselling author Tom Wolfe called one of the most important social critics of our time.

We don’t see stories about people like me or my dad. Indeed, network executives say to my face that I don’t exist. That’s the problem.

Ten years ago, Mexican American actress Lupe Ontiveros lamented to the New York Times that she had been cast as a maid 150 times in her career. The astounding number of times this one (outstanding) Latina actress has been cast as a maid destroys Longoria’s defense of Devious Maids as “Latina maids deserving to have their stories told, too.” According to academic research on Latino roles in mainstream US film and TV, the maid is pretty much the only Latina story being told, other than seductress, whore, dying immigrant and gang member.

There is more to stereotyping of Latinas than laziness or lack of information.

– Alisa Valdes, “The problem with “Devious Maids” goes far beyond Hollywood” via NBCLatino, June 7, 2013

  • zdrav

    Jesus Christ. In my opinion, it’s not that these studio executives don’t know that non-stereotypical minorities exist. It’s rather that they DON’T WANT them to exist. To them, the idea of White Centrality is key, and minorities are only welcome if they add some kind of secondary spice. In fact, minorities that aren’t stereotypical threaten are a bothersome threat because they threaten to push White people from center stage. To use a sports metaphor, it’s as if these people have decided that starting line-up will be entirely White, and the only minorities they’ll take are the role players (such as prisoner-dating Latinas, exotic Asians, sassy Blacks, etc.). And if a minority came along who wanted to be a starter rather than a role player, well, then that would collectively threaten the White monopoly on playing time and attention.

  • Kristen

    I’m so torn about this show. Do I support the actresses and watch the show? Or do I skip the show and continue to voice my concern over the relegation of WOC to stereotyped roles? Part of me believes that if I can watch Mad Men – whose problematics have been consistently pointed out by Racialicious – then I can watch this show, if for no other reason than to keep these wonderful actresses working.