10.25.12 Links Roundup

As black players, we need to stick together and make sure we do not put up with being racially abused. Furthermore, being told to get on with it or shake hands is an absolute kick in the teeth to the men and women that have made the sacrifice for us.

Black players have been made to conform, to overlook things that if said or heard in a different environment would warrant a different reaction.

The things that are said on a daily basis among team-mates are passed off as “banter”, but this “banter” can be offensive. If this “banter” occurred in any other line of work, the culprit would be disciplined immediately.

David James, the former England goalkeeper who played his club football for Liverpool, Aston Villa, West Ham, Manchester City and Portsmouth, recently stated that racism has been all but eradicated.

As one of the most famous black players over the last two decades, he should really think more before he offers an opinion so far from the truth. He needs to take his head out of the sand and realise what is going on around him.

But there are some Muslims who, repelled by the Democrats’ positions on social issues, are voting Romney.
Umar Ahmad Ghuman is a Pennsylvania voter and dual citizen who served as a minister of investment in Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf’s government.

He’s always voted Republican, but this election cycle Ghuman was inspired to launch an organisation called Muslims for Romney after he discovered the public school his eighth-grade son attended had given a writing assignment on a lesbian couple who had spoken there.

Muslims for Romney, he says, aims to show both Republicans and Muslims “how similar our values are”, and to encourage Muslim voters “to wake up and fight against abortion and gay rights”. Decrying what he describes as the “unholy, unnatural alliance” between Muslim voters and Democrats, he urges Muslims to pay more attention to social issues within the US.

After nearly 50 years of applying anti-discrimination laws, American workplaces are still dominated by white men. Men of color and all women have more access to some jobs than they used to, but the ranks of decisionmakers come nowhere close to reflecting our numbers in the nation as a whole. This is the root of the “tokenism” complaint that I hear constantly as I travel the country. Tokenism means that you can come to the meeting, but no one will pay any attention to what you say. It means that the workplace will open the door to you, as long as you look (to the extent possible) and act just like the white men who are already there. It means that you’ll get invited to the party, but you won’t be allowed to make any requests of the DJ or help set the playlist.

I’ve seen dozens of “diverse” workplaces in which all the people of color are in the manual jobs and all the women are doing clerical work. All work has dignity and value, but no one should be stuck in a position they’ve outgrown because employers segregate their workers by race and gender. In the high end of the restaurant industry, for example, I’ve heard a never-ending round of stories from men of color (because women still can’t get a foot in that door) about working as a busser for years, knowing every item on the menu, and never being able to get one of the front-of-the-house jobs because they don’t fit the profile of a high-end waiter.

I feel like all white people have to see the film just because I’ve never seen a movie in which most of the white characters in the movie were just working. It was fucking great. It was almost comical. There was a scene during the wedding reception, and there are, like, eight white people just carrying stuff. The main white character with some dialogue was the ditzy, stupid assistant. I enjoyed it so much because you never see that. But that’s something that I think white people don’t notice. They don’t notice that the fourth character is black and that’s what it always is. It’s always happening. It’s just the assumption that, “Well, that’s just a representation of life.”

An African Election: Rhetoric Around Voting In Close Elections

With polls saying that President Obama and presidential hopeful Mitt Romney are in a dead heat–and the latest Electoral College count favoring the current president–we’re noticing the bubbling of liberal and other left-leaning people saying that they’re so dissatisfied with Obama’s performance that they’re not going to vote for him but are planning to “vote with their conscience.” Others say that, by doing so, the “conscientious objecting” voters are essentially throwing the election to Romney. This recalls similar rhetoric in the 2000 election, when those who supported then-presidential candidate Al Gore said his loss wouldn’t have been so contested if the Ralph Nader supporters didn’t “throw their vote away” on the third-party candidate.

Who’s right? And how did Ghanaians handle their own close election in 2008? And what can USians learn from Ghanaian voters?

Racialicious, National Black Programming Consortium’s AfroPoP.TV, and guest tweeters Scot Nakagawa (@nakagawascot) and Kenyon Farrow (@kenyonfarrow) will discuss these very issues on Twitter tonight at 7:30PM.

If you haven’t checked out Jarreth Merz’s An African Election, it’s available on YouTube until 11/1. Check out the film, and join the tweetversation!

 

Meanwhile, On TumblR: Donald Trump’s Latest Racism And Bruce Lee

By Andrea Plaid

Tumblizens really loved NY Daily News writer Zerlina Maxwell’s take on Donald Trump’s latest racist efforts to undermine President Obama’s credibility:

Apparently, Donald Trump, a man very concerned with whether President Obama, a Harvard-educated law professor, is just another dumb brown person riding the affirmative action ticket, wants to give $5 million dollars to charity if the President releases his college transcripts.

This is what racism looks like. Please save the, “Oh you are a typical liberal always playing the race card” response and take a moment to hear me out. First, racism is not a card. It’s a reality for many black and brown people in 2012. If you are not a person of color, it’s important you don’t find yourself quickly discounting the pervasive existence of racism in 2012, without actually speaking with a person of color. Assuming things are just better because we can drink at the same water fountain isn’t sufficient.

And, looking at what Tumblizens <3′d and reblogged the most this week, the late Bruce Lee still gets all sorts of love:

Swing by and check out what we’re <3′ing and reblogging–and commenting on–at the R’s Tumblr!

 

The Walking Dead 3.2: “Sick”

Hosted By Fashion and Entertainment Editor Joe Lamour

Last week, we welcomed back The Walking Dead with a chorus of Hurray’s, Whoa’s and Ew’s. Our newly assembled roundtable covered the highs (Michonne and all the beheading;), the lows (Lori, of course. An axe to the shin came in a close second;) and usual stuff we’ve all come to expect: the usual lack of dialogue for T-Dog. Jeannie and I could only recall a single word, and some noises (“Woo!”). On Monday, I postulated that he’s given lines anyone could say. Let’s see if this episode is any different. Jeannie Chan & Carly Louise Mitchell join me in discussion this week.

We ask that you keep the spoilery spoiler-ness to a minimum in the comments, even though there are some episode-related ones under the cut.

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Ashok and Amrit Go to the Movies

By Guest Contributor Ashok Kondabolu, cross-posted from Asian-American Writers’ Workshop

Stereogum executive editor Amrit Singh. Dosa Hunt premiere photos by Laura June Kirsch.

Amrit Singh is the executive editor of music blog Stereogum and the mastermind behind the newly released documentary short Dosa Hunt, which features Singh and his music pals (Ashok Kondabolu and Himanshu Suri of Das Racist, jazz musician Vijay Iyer, Rostam Batmanglij of Vampire Weekend, Alan Palomo of Neon Indian, and Anand Wilder of Yeasayer) searching for the best dosa in New York City. (Interview magazine calls it “part No Reservations, part Big Brother, part something smarter.”) Singh was a lawyer who blogged on nights and weekends, until his review of a Sufjan Stevens concert brought him to the attention of Stereogum founder Scott Lapatine. Here, Singh satiates Kondabolu’s curiosity about where he was on 9/11, why he chose to write about the Sikh tragedy on a music blog, and what he has in common with Pharrell (hint: it has to do with tattoos).

Dosa Hunt ends its premiere run tonight at Nitehawk Cinema in Brooklyn.

DOSA HUNT Trailer from amrit singh on Vimeo.

Ashok: Hello, this is Ashok. I’m with Amrit Singh of Stereogum at The Woods on 9/11/12.
Amrit: I’m DJ-ing a wedding this weekend which, yeah, I don’t usually do that.

Whose wedding is it?
It’s a friend. Her name is Jenny Slate. She does a lot of comedy. She just recently moved out to LA.

Ah, Jenny Slate from SNL.
“Marcel the Shell.” Saturday Night LiveBored to Death. She’s great, and she’s getting married up in Boston. You know, you never wanna fuck up a wedding. Because, it’s everyone’s special day.

They’re usually pretty easy to DJ.
Yeah, but also—I imagine for some wedding DJs, it’s always potentially lucrative because they can get more business but, if they fuck up, it can be kind of anonymous. ‘Cause nobody knows who the wedding DJ is. In this case, it’s like a very personal affair so, if I mess up, it comes back to me.

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Voting And The Battle For White Cultural Dominance

By Guest Contributor Scot Nakagawa, cross-posted from Race Files

Since the beginning of 2011, conservatives have rolled out a broad wave of voter suppression efforts ranging from imposing voter ID requirements and blocking early voting, to the intimidation tactics of groups like True the Vote. Not surprisingly, these efforts to place road blocks–including what amount to poll taxes–between eligible voters and the ballot box are targeted primarily at young people and people of color, the groups that helped make up the margin of victory for Barack Obama in 2008.

But then you probably already knew that.

Some of you also probably know that voter suppression didn’t come out of nowhere. It’s just the latest in a long line of similar efforts that runs all the way through American history.

As I mulled over that history, an ad from my childhood popped into my head.  Here’s that ad.


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Voices: Russell Means (1939-2012)


- Russell Means, May 2011.

One thing about Russell I always remembered, and I think someone else once said it, you may have loved him, or you may have disliked him, but you couldn’t ignore him. I’ll always remember when an elder said one time, I was at a ceremony and I asked what this half shaped moon circle on the ground meant, and he said it was a symbol of the circle of life, the never ending of the circle of life, and I said there is only half a circle, and he said the other half was unseen, it is the spirit world. For Indian people it never ends, we don’t have a linear existence, so I know I will see Russell again, and I take comfort in that thought. For men like Russell Means don’t come along in a lifetime very often. He was truly an inspiration for all of us younger guys at the time.
- Leonald Peltier, via Aboriginal Press News

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Quoted: Shadow & Act On Zoe Saldana Playing Nina Simone

On-set photo of Zoe Saldana as Nina Simone, via Shadow & Act.

Let me just first say that, in all fairness, we don’t know what stage of the make-up process she’s in here. So the final *look* after all the work is done (which may or may not include prosthetics), might be very different from what we see here.

So, I wouldn’t judge based solely on these pictures.

However, what we could probably learn from the photos is that Zoe Saldana will likely be made-up to resemble Nina Simone as much as possible, afro and all.
- From “Photos Of Zoe Saldana On-Set Of Nina Simone Project Surface (What Can We Learn From Them?)”