Month: October 2012

October 25, 2012 / / links
October 25, 2012 / / An African Election
October 25, 2012 / / Meanwhile On TumblR
October 24, 2012 / / Entertainment

Hosted By Fashion and Entertainment Editor Joe Lamour

Last week, we welcomed back The Walking Dead with a chorus of Hurray’s, Whoa’s and Ew’s. Our newly assembled roundtable covered the highs (Michonne and all the beheading;), the lows (Lori, of course. An axe to the shin came in a close second;) and usual stuff we’ve all come to expect: the usual lack of dialogue for T-Dog. Jeannie and I could only recall a single word, and some noises (“Woo!”). On Monday, I postulated that he’s given lines anyone could say. Let’s see if this episode is any different. Jeannie Chan & Carly Louise Mitchell join me in discussion this week.

We ask that you keep the spoilery spoiler-ness to a minimum in the comments, even though there are some episode-related ones under the cut.

Read the Post The Walking Dead 3.2: “Sick”

October 24, 2012 / / activism

By Guest Contributor Ashok Kondabolu, cross-posted from Asian-American Writers’ Workshop

Stereogum executive editor Amrit Singh. Dosa Hunt premiere photos by Laura June Kirsch.

Amrit Singh is the executive editor of music blog Stereogum and the mastermind behind the newly released documentary short Dosa Hunt, which features Singh and his music pals (Ashok Kondabolu and Himanshu Suri of Das Racist, jazz musician Vijay Iyer, Rostam Batmanglij of Vampire Weekend, Alan Palomo of Neon Indian, and Anand Wilder of Yeasayer) searching for the best dosa in New York City. (Interview magazine calls it “part No Reservations, part Big Brother, part something smarter.”) Singh was a lawyer who blogged on nights and weekends, until his review of a Sufjan Stevens concert brought him to the attention of Stereogum founder Scott Lapatine. Here, Singh satiates Kondabolu’s curiosity about where he was on 9/11, why he chose to write about the Sikh tragedy on a music blog, and what he has in common with Pharrell (hint: it has to do with tattoos).

Dosa Hunt ends its premiere run tonight at Nitehawk Cinema in Brooklyn.

DOSA HUNT Trailer from amrit singh on Vimeo.

Ashok: Hello, this is Ashok. I’m with Amrit Singh of Stereogum at The Woods on 9/11/12.
Amrit: I’m DJ-ing a wedding this weekend which, yeah, I don’t usually do that.

Whose wedding is it?
It’s a friend. Her name is Jenny Slate. She does a lot of comedy. She just recently moved out to LA.

Ah, Jenny Slate from SNL.
“Marcel the Shell.” Saturday Night LiveBored to Death. She’s great, and she’s getting married up in Boston. You know, you never wanna fuck up a wedding. Because, it’s everyone’s special day.

They’re usually pretty easy to DJ.
Yeah, but also—I imagine for some wedding DJs, it’s always potentially lucrative because they can get more business but, if they fuck up, it can be kind of anonymous. ‘Cause nobody knows who the wedding DJ is. In this case, it’s like a very personal affair so, if I mess up, it comes back to me.

Read the Post Ashok and Amrit Go to the Movies

October 24, 2012 / / ethnocentrism

By Guest Contributor Scot Nakagawa, cross-posted from Race Files

Since the beginning of 2011, conservatives have rolled out a broad wave of voter suppression efforts ranging from imposing voter ID requirements and blocking early voting, to the intimidation tactics of groups like True the Vote. Not surprisingly, these efforts to place road blocks–including what amount to poll taxes–between eligible voters and the ballot box are targeted primarily at young people and people of color, the groups that helped make up the margin of victory for Barack Obama in 2008.

But then you probably already knew that.

Some of you also probably know that voter suppression didn’t come out of nowhere. It’s just the latest in a long line of similar efforts that runs all the way through American history.

As I mulled over that history, an ad from my childhood popped into my head.  Here’s that ad.


Read the Post Voting And The Battle For White Cultural Dominance

October 23, 2012 / / Voices


– Russell Means, May 2011.

One thing about Russell I always remembered, and I think someone else once said it, you may have loved him, or you may have disliked him, but you couldn’t ignore him. I’ll always remember when an elder said one time, I was at a ceremony and I asked what this half shaped moon circle on the ground meant, and he said it was a symbol of the circle of life, the never ending of the circle of life, and I said there is only half a circle, and he said the other half was unseen, it is the spirit world. For Indian people it never ends, we don’t have a linear existence, so I know I will see Russell again, and I take comfort in that thought. For men like Russell Means don’t come along in a lifetime very often. He was truly an inspiration for all of us younger guys at the time.
– Leonald Peltier, via Aboriginal Press News

Read the Post Voices: Russell Means (1939-2012)

October 23, 2012 / / black