Month: September 2012

September 26, 2012 / / An African Election
September 26, 2012 / / Open Thread

By Arturo R. García

Journalist Mona Eltahawy was arrested in New York City Tuesday for defacing one of several Islamophobic posters paid for by right-wing radio Patricia Geller. Though the arresting officer never answered her question, Eltahawy was indeed charged–she revealed on Twitter that she was booked for criminal mischief, a misdemeanor.

Geller, who helped popularize the “Ground Zero Mosque” myth, has been shown by at least one study to be part of the dog-whistle playlists that make up much of the conservative airwaves.

And if you thought photographer Patricia Hall’s attempt to block Eltahawy in the name of “free speech” was dubious, you’re not wrong: Reuters columnist Anthony De Rosa pointed out that last month, Hall posted a bizarre photo essay trailing Muslims in Times Square asking, “Is Sharia coming to America?”

You might also recall Eltahawy gaining attention earlier this year for “Why Do They Hate Us?,” her cover story for Foreign Policy magazine:

Name me an Arab country, and I’ll recite a litany of abuses fueled by a toxic mix of culture and religion that few seem willing or able to disentangle lest they blaspheme or offend. When more than 90 percent of ever-married women in Egypt–including my mother and all but one of her six sisters–have had their genitals cut in the name of modesty, then surely we must all blaspheme.

Read the Post Open Thread: On Mona Eltahawy And #MuslimRage

September 25, 2012 / / LGBTQ

By Guest Contributors Paul and Renee of Fangs for the Fantasy; originally published at Feministe

It’s not a new idea–we’ve certainly seen it raising its ugly head in media repeatedly, but it’s become popular again–the “flipped prejudice” fiction. Victoria Foyt’s racist Save The Pearls did it for race and we now have the homophobic versions: a Kickstarter for the book Out by Laura Preble and the film Love Is All You Need. I hate linking to them but they need to be seen. They both have the same premise: an all gay world that persecutes the straight minority.

So that’s more appropriating the issues we live with: our history, our suffering, and then shitting on it all by making us the perpetrators of the violations committed against us. How can they not see how offensive this is? How can they not see how offensive taking the severe bigotry thrown at us every day and throughout history–bigotry that has cost us so much and then making our oppressors the victims and us the attackers–is? This is appropriative. This is offensive. It’s disrespectful–and it’s outright bigoted.
Read the Post Reverse Oppression: A Fad That Needs To End

September 24, 2012 / / announcements
September 24, 2012 / / black

By Guest Contributor MK, cross-posted from Prison Culture

On April 19, 1989, a young woman who was jogging through Central Park in New York City was found badly beaten. She had also been raped.

I have written briefly about the case before in comparing it to Scottsboro. However, I want to return to it today because I just saw the trailer for Ken Burns’ upcoming documentary about the case and it brings back terrible memories for me.

I was living in New York City at the time of this incident. I was 17 years old, a senior in high school. My school was across the street from Central Park and I was terrified. Just a few months before, I had been sexually assaulted (not in the park) and now I was certain that I would be targeted again.
Read the Post Super-Predators, ‘Wilding,’ And The Central Park Five

September 21, 2012 / / Racialicious Crush Of The Week
September 20, 2012 / / An African Election

Ask a simple question, get incredible answers.

That’s what happened during yesterday’s tweet-up when the R and National Black Programming Consortium‘s AfroPoP.TV asked African feminist activist/scholars Minna Salami (a.k.a @MsAfropolitan) and Yaba Blay (a.k.a. @fiyawata) to offer their Twitterfied thoughts on African feminisms and their influence in Ghanaian policies and politics. How feminism and gender play out in Ghana’s 2008 election is a question that is touched on in Jarreth Merz’s documentary, An African Election.

During the lively discussion with our fantastic guest tweeters, the R asked them about how the race is constructed in African feminisms versus how it’s constructed in Western, specifically US, Black feminism/womanism. Their answers are after the jump.

Read the Post An African Election: African Feminisms With Minna Salami And Yaba Blay