Open Thread: R.I.P. Troy Anthony Davis

By Arturo R. García

… That it was unanimous, was maybe the worst touch of what Amnesty USA’s Larry Cox called a “grotesque spectacle.” The Supreme Court of the United States of America made a man stay in a gurney for three hours while they decided whether he could keep living. And then they said no.

All of them said no. Without a published dissent, that’s how the record will read, reports of the Court not being “necessarily unanimous” be damned.

The system failed Troy Davis. It failed us all. My heart goes out to him, and to his family. And my thanks to Amy Goodman and Democracy Now for their excellent job covering this tragedy.

Consider this thread a safe space to talk about … about what we just witnessed, all of us. And how we can make sense of it.

  • Zek J Evets

    I know a lot of people will look at me and think, “Why do you care that Troy Davis was killed?”

    I know, I’m just a little White Jewish kid from the ‘burbs, still kicking it at college, but when I say, “I Am Troy Davis”, I don’t mean literally “I am a wrongfully convicted, wrongfully executed Black American, or potentially so.” I mean that I am his brother, his friend, his total stranger. I mean that I support the cause of racial, class, gender, and sexual solidarity with all the peoples of this nation, and of this earth. I mean that I am angry, and I am here to speak out against this perverse injustice.

    But even more, for me this tragedy hits home in a very personal, and unexpected way.

    I am in an interracial relationship with a Black woman. It’s serious. We have plans to get married (someday), and have kids (someday). But after seeing the murder of an innocent man by the Not-So-Great State of Georgia, I worry about those future plans.

    I am afraid.

    How can, privileged dude like myself, possibly hope to prepare my sons (and daughters!) for a life in a country where their lives will never be so valued as my own, and for no better reason than their g*dd*mn skin color!? How can I raise children in a country where justice is not only colorblind, but heartless and foolish.

    How can I raise mixed-race children in a racist society?

    Still got no answers. Despite the long conversations into the night with my girlfriend, planning and thinking and wondering, we’re still stuck back at square one: This Same Old Ish.

    Troy Davis could have been one of my (future) kids. Could be my (future) brother-in-law. Could be my friend. Could have been my friend…

    I know I’m not literally Troy Davis. I know for me this struggle will never be the same as it is for Men of Color, or for People of Color in general. But I can appreciate the fact that, for me, this is stuff from which I must learn in order to even think about seriously raising a family in America.

    So, for me, I am Troy Davis, because his life, and his death, changed me forever.

  • Zek J Evets

    I know a lot of people will look at me and think, “Why do you care that Troy Davis was killed?”

    I know, I’m just a little White Jewish kid from the ‘burbs, still kicking it at college, but when I say, “I Am Troy Davis”, I don’t mean literally “I am a wrongfully convicted, wrongfully executed Black American, or potentially so.” I mean that I am his brother, his friend, his total stranger. I mean that I support the cause of racial, class, gender, and sexual solidarity with all the peoples of this nation, and of this earth. I mean that I am angry, and I am here to speak out against this perverse injustice.

    But even more, for me this tragedy hits home in a very personal, and unexpected way.

    I am in an interracial relationship with a Black woman. It’s serious. We have plans to get married (someday), and have kids (someday). But after seeing the murder of an innocent man by the Not-So-Great State of Georgia, I worry about those future plans.

    I am afraid.

    How can, privileged dude like myself, possibly hope to prepare my sons (and daughters!) for a life in a country where their lives will never be so valued as my own, and for no better reason than their g*dd*mn skin color!? How can I raise children in a country where justice is not only colorblind, but heartless and foolish.

    How can I raise mixed-race children in a racist society?

    Still got no answers. Despite the long conversations into the night with my girlfriend, planning and thinking and wondering, we’re still stuck back at square one: This Same Old Ish.

    Troy Davis could have been one of my (future) kids. Could be my (future) brother-in-law. Could be my friend. Could have been my friend…

    I know I’m not literally Troy Davis. I know for me this struggle will never be the same as it is for Men of Color, or for People of Color in general. But I can appreciate the fact that, for me, this is stuff from which I must learn in order to even think about seriously raising a family in America.

    So, for me, I am Troy Davis, because his life, and his death, changed me forever.

  • Bob Gordon

    May Troy Davis rest in peace but resurface always.  May the truth of the injustice against him haunt this culture’s collective memory.

    They
    chose a human being as an effigy to humiliate and execute — a designated Other to symbolize the manufactured
    Otherness they assert now threatens the symbol of the United States (which they like to call “America”). 

    They need that excuse to sacrifice dark-skinned people
    arbitrarily in the Roman coliseum of the courts.  Feigned sincerity’s their code for cynical participation.

    The abuse of capital punishment has created an endless stream of blood that has since become an ocean.  The death penalty has made the State the lynch mob’s instrument.

    What can we do — right now — to stop these carefully selected victims’ blood from flowing? 
    What can we do as citizens, as activists, to stop dark-skinned people from being targeted and killed in the
    name of a manufactured cultural war over the ownership of symbols?  A human being’s death is not a meme.

  • Anonymous

    My, my. So much ignorance being spewed in a Troy Davis thread in this lesbian forum. Sad: http://s1.zetaboards.com/L_Anon/topic/4514140/1/

  • http://brothawolf.wordpress.com Brotha Wolf

    Some people have been saying how they’ve lost faith in the “justice” system or that they are ashamed of this country. For those who are making such statements, with all due respect, save it. 

    This nation had the opportunity to face its pathologies and mend its ways in regards to its treatment of black people. But, it didn’t because it doesn’t want to come to terms with their problems. Unfortunately, Troy Davis’ murder was proof positive of the continuous genocidal, racist spirit that lurks within every goddamn institution within this country. And ya’ll are ashamed because they’ve killed this man? Ya’ll have just now lost faith in the injustice system? 

    Come on, people!

    This country doesn’t deserve yours or anyone else’s respect. It was built off the blood, sweat, and tears of blacks on top of the corpses of the original Americans who were here first. Everytime the subject of those historic truths surface, people with loads of privilege try to find a way to suppress it deeper and deeper and blame you for bringing it up while going about their zealous ways while black people live in fear and anger of living in a white supremacist nation such as the United States of America. More blacks will die in numbers one way or another, some of them before their time. More will end up unemployed or underemployed because of racist practices in the job market. More will end up in prison, and more will end up on death row. 

    To say that you’re ashamed of this nation or lost faith in the system is to acknowledge how out of touch of reality you are like I was. If other injustices haven’t convinced you that this isn’t the land of the free and the hope of the brave with liberty and justice for all, let this be a damn lesson to you. 

    Pardon me, but I’m still angry and depressed over this.

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  • msgray
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  • Anonymous

    There are two (maybe even three) sociological arguments to be had in this situation. One is about the racism inherent in the system. As has been repeated consistently: the race of victim matters far more than the race of the accused, when it comes to capital punishment. THen there are the racial inequalities in the other levels of the judical system, particularly in the South.

    But to me, the more pressing issue is the death penalty in of itself. As a civilized nation us using the death penalty is ridiculous. If you want to talk empirically we find that no solid data supports it, and so I’d rather not do it then use something that “might be a deterrent”. Regardless of the person’s race, class, gender, or guilt even, I think taking their life for a crime is barbaric.

    But not many people want to get down to the nitty gritty of this.

  • Anonymous

    Meanwhile, that white DART cop Johannes Mehserle is a free man after serving half of a two year sentence for killing an unarmed black man on camera in front of many witnesses who recorded the event.

    I’m feeling some sort of way.  That’s typical, unfortunately.  Most of the things I want to say will be moderated, so I digress.  RIP Troy.

  • Roundelay78

     Yeah, that whole situation with Davis’s case was fucked up—-here in Detroit last Friday, the community group I’ve been involved in with held a protest downtown with clipboards full of petitions that got filled up (I signed one and clicked online to sign another my dang self). The other night when I heard about him getting a stay, I was like, “Yes! He might get another chance!” But what made me mad about his case was that it seemed like the State of Georgia, instead of wanting to admit that, maybe, just MAYBE, they had made a mistake, it’s like they were hellbent on showing the world that they were gonna do what the hell they wanted to do with him, despite the pressure on them to reassess his case. As if they they were saying, “Ain’t NOBODY gonna tell us what the hell to do with OUR damn prisoners, gotdammit. We don’t give a damn whether he’s innocent or not.” That’s how it came off to me. It was like, since he was a black man accused of killing a cop and in Georgia, that he never had a chance in hell of getting yet another stay—that’s the sad part about it. A friend of mine left me a voice mail this morning saying that he’d been executed–all in all, it’s still messed the hell up.

  • travis

    I am truly upset about what happened to Mr. Davis. This forces me to ask, if he had been a white man, how much different would this trial have gone? Would he even be on death row? Its truly a shame the way we people of color are treated and viewed in this country. My heart goes out to Mr. Davis’ family. I hope that even with his death, they can find justice.

  • http://rvcbard.blogspot.com RVCBard

    My feelings about this are still sort of raw, but I’ll try to articulate what it’s like.

    It’s like knowing somebody who can’t help fucking up everything they touch. Then something comes along where they have the opportunity to not fuck shit up. And you’re hoping that that if it’s important enough, they could, for once, just this once, NOT fuck shit up. 

    But they do what they’ve always done and fuck shit up anyway.

  • cassz

    I don’t have that information, but I did come across this:

    Why the Supreme Court Couldn’t Save Troy Davis

  • Keis

    My friend and I were having a conversation while we waited to hear if they were going to grant him a stay of execution. My friend, who is an international student, asked point blankly, “They can’t do this? They won’t let a man die if there is reasonable doubt.” Unfortunately, I stayed quiet for a moment and I replied that they could. I tried to stay optimistic while we waited but once we heard the verdict, I became saddened and enraged. To think that in 2011 we still have have such a grave issue such as this is just startling. Not only has the system failed us but in essence the country has failed us. The world is watching us with saddened eyes because of the fact that this happened.
    But now is the time to get up and fight so there will not be another Troy Davis. Davis has said so himself that we should move forward and continue the fight. And that is exactly what I intend to do. My energies are with Troy Davis, the Davis family, and the MacPhail family.

  • Keis

    My friend and I were having a conversation while we waited to hear if they were going to grant him a stay of execution. My friend, who is an international student, asked point blankly, “They can’t do this? They won’t let a man die if there is reasonable doubt.” Unfortunately, I stayed quiet for a moment and I replied that they could. I tried to stay optimistic while we waited but once we heard the verdict, I became saddened and enraged. To think that in 2011 we still have have such a grave issue such as this is just startling. Not only has the system failed us but in essence the country has failed us. The world is watching us with saddened eyes because of the fact that this happened.
    But now is the time to get up and fight so there will not be another Troy Davis. Davis has said so himself that we should move forward and continue the fight. And that is exactly what I intend to do. My energies are with Troy Davis, the Davis family, and the MacPhail family.

  • Ashley

    I cried as soon as I came home from work. The last thing before I started to close the store was that the SCOTUS was deciding and I thought(stupid I know) that they will do the right thing but as we see that is not the case.

    I cried so hard for him, a man I never knew.
    I cried for his family that I never knew.
    I cried for all the Troy Davis out there.
    I cried for the Justice System that was never actually just.
    I cried for my brothers, sisters, Father, uncles, and my cousins.
    I cried for my future children, my future nephews and nieces,
    and future cousins because I know this can happened to them at anytime.

    This morning I stopped crying because I know it will not solve anything. It takes action to get things done and I will try to the best of my ability to get not only our “Justice” system back to what it suppose to do but to get my Country back to what is suppose to make it great.

  • Frowner

    I feel like this was an act of state terror – an intentional gesture to say “we decide who lives and dies, and justice and law must bow to our will”.  Public outcry, protestations of  innocence, these don’t count for anything.  The state doesn’t need to appear publicly legitimate – it doesn’t need anymore to pretend that it’s just or fair or responsive.  It operates on terror.   And of course, because the state is a racist state, it proves by basically intentionally killing an almost-certainly-innocent black man in the face of all kinds of outcry.   I mean, I think the cruelty is actually the point – it’s a demonstration that the state can be cruel, can be racist, can torture people – and we are helpless to prevent it.  That’s probably not literally what the Supreme Court was thinking, but they were obviously choosing to back up a racist government and a racist justice system in order to maintain ruling class solidarity – bosses can’t criticize bosses, or everyone else starts getting ideas. There was a case in the UK in the fifties – the the Derek Bentley case – where they chose to execute a mentally disabled man who had been associated with the murder of a police officer but who was not competent to stand trial and was not the gunman, and they chose to hang him over huge public objection on purpose because the government felt that there was too much public unrest and crime during the austerity period after the war.  It was supposed to be exemplary.  Just like this case,  people didn’t think it would happen,  they thought there’d be a last-minute pardon because it was so grotesquely unjust.  Derek Bentley got a posthumous pardon fifty years later, which his family wanted, but too little so much too late.   But I mean, there are governments so corrupt that they will knowingly execute the innocent simply to ‘send a message’. What’s different from the UK is that we have, basically, a popular upswelling of white fascist/racist sentiment to back up the state. I just hate it, I’m so so sorry for his family and for everyone who has been closely involved in this situation. 

  • h3ll0

    Rest in Peace, Troy Davis.

    Interesting college student blog discussing the race of the troy davis jury:

    http://convosofcolor.com/2011/09/22/a-%E2%80%9Cfair%E2%80%9D-price-the-death-penalty-and-race/

  • Rocio

    The note Sent from Change.org on the petition against Troy Davis’s Death
    Dear Rocio,The state of Georgia killed Troy Davis tonight.Despite so much doubt about Troy Davis’s guilt — including seven witnesses who changed or recanted their testimony, and three jurors who convicted Troy who later asked that his life be spared — Georgia’s parole board decided he should die. And so tonight at 11:08 Eastern Time, he was killed by lethal injection.His sister, Kim Davis, wanted to tell you what her brother said before he died:”When Troy saw that more than 250,000 Change.org members signed a petition that was delivered to the board in his name, he called to tell me he was deeply moved. He told me he knew that he had supporters around the world, but he had no idea that the support was that widespread.”Kim has said that she’ll keep fighting, for the next Troy Davis and the one after that. And she knows so many of us will join her in this fight.Troy Davis was not alone when he died. Thank you for standing with him.- Patrick and the entire Change.org team

  • Drew

    I honestly, naively believed there was no way this would actually happen. And now I just feel sick. 

  • boylouie

    Prejudice prevailed, not justice. Very, very sad day.

  • Xi_Xi Top

    Damn, I just…I don’t know how to express my feelings w/out coming off like a jerk.  I haven’t followed the case thoroughly enough to be convinced of definitive innocence or guilt (but from what I do know, I think there is sufficient reasonable doubt & a lot of people smarter/better read than me are convinced of Davis’ innocence). Simply put tho, I don’t support the death penalty in any form.  Have the State murdering people who murder people to show that murder is an inhumane act is just an ass backwards practice. The State sanctioned murder of Davis is just another example (of which there are thousands/millions I’m sure) of how we continue to fail as a society.  And yes, Davis being disadvantaged by his race, class, sex, & geographical location (in a super rigged “justice” system) are all integral to why he was murdered in the first place.

  • http://www.facebook.com/tmadiyna Tassy Madiyna

    This social atrocity and humane injustice has confirmed that if I ever want to bring a son into the world (regardless of what race his father will be) I will have to vacate America. I just know that I could not risk my son meeting a similar fate. It seems the American judicial system is seeking to wipe AA’s off the map; one innocent black man at a time.

    • salbaje

      i hear you.  i am a 1.5 generation immigrant to the US and have long held conflicted feelings about my adopted country.   yet, i still held out hope that the state would do the right thing, that in the face of so much doubt, mr. davis’ execution would not come to pass.

      i am enraged at some comments made elsewhere by people who are certain of mr. davis’ guilt and that “justice has been served”.  such comments seem to reflect an unapologetic refusal to accept as valid the experiences of black, indigenous, brown, and poor people at the hands of the US “justice system” here and abroad.   this is america: “nasty, terminal, and mean” as the character, belize, says in kushner’s “angels in america”.  

      RIP mr. davis. may you find the peace that so eluded you on earth  in Whatever Comes Next.

  • Mamzerhakodesh

    What really gives me some relief is knowing that I’m not the only one staring at my computer being angry and sad and despairing and enraged right now. You read about this insane psychotic B.S. every day, and usually it’s and an international but relatively smallish group of people determined to watch and not try not to focus on the fact that our world is dimming and melting in more ways than one. But this time, I’m not one of a few. I’m one of over a million who have fought and who are feeling right now. And knowing I’m not alone makes my feelings stress me out less. I sent two cards to Troy Davis, and got a letter back each time. I was surprised because I hadn’t included a return stamp. 

    • Joel Reinstein

      staring at the computer in anger sucks. what are we going to do about this?

  • Digital Coyote

    So sayeth Scalia:

    This Court has never held that the Constitution forbids the execution of
    a convicted defendant who has had a full and fair trial but is later
    able to convince a habeas court that he is “actually” innocent. Quite
    to the contrary, we have repeatedly left that question unresolved, while
    expressing considerable doubt that any claim based on alleged “actual
    innocence” is constitutionally cognizable

    From: http://www.talkleft.com/story/2009/8/19/3592/67054

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=430798 Clara Shao-Tan

    Thank you for posting this thread as well as the Final Voices post. RIP Troy Davis.

  • Digital Coyote

    Black’s Behavior of Law is a must-read in this situation.  It pretty much validates everything about the hows and whys of the imbalances that we Racialicians have observed.  My observations of my classmates, faculty, and professionals in my program lead me to believe that nothing will change in the near future and, yes, it’s as racist as you think. 

    The justice system is broken and the people in charge of it know it.  The people that can fix it know it.  It’s not in their best interest to do so, lest they been seen as “soft” on crime, and thusly it remains in its current state.  Good law (e.g. three strikes) gets expanded to include everyone, not just the worst of the worst that it was meant to contain.  Our esteemed Supreme Court has quite the history with regard to making it difficult for people to prove their cases were mishandled.  The feds abolished a government funded center that provided people with competent defense; it was shut down because the employees were “too good” at saving people’s lives.  After arrest, we have usually been denied counsel when we needed it most (which is long before they ever bring the lawyer in).

    These same  people that made for-profit companies in to people need to be ashamed of themselves for failing a real living breathing human being.

  • Manchief

    “The application for stay of execution of sentence of death presented to Justice Thomas and by him referred to the Court is denied.” U.S.S.C. Justice Thomas…  Troy Davis’s fate was sealed  the moment Clarence Thomas was sworn in.

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  • inrespect

    Ashamed of this country especially tonight. Thanks for making this thread. Feeling totally powerless.

  • http://rvcbard.blogspot.com RVCBard

    I am also noting the macabre irony of these bloodthirsty bastards probably being pro-life.

  • Kendra

    The two things getting to me most right now that this has come to pass:

    The white kids all over FB and Twitter saying ‘I am Troy Davis’. I understand what they’re doing and I’m certain the cause appreciated all of the solidarity and support it got, but I can’t help but wonder if they understand that they are NOT Troy Davis because this wouldn’t happen to them.

    Then, the fact that the Supreme Court waited until literally the last possible moment to stay the execution… only to then deliver the unanimous ruling three hours later. How, in any way, was that not cruel? To wait until the man had probably already been offered the pre-death sedative, and was likely coming to terms and trying to work through what was about to happen? To stop the process and take three hours to make a decision only to have to take him through that process again just seems beyond the bounds of cruel and unusual mentally, if not physically. I have such a hard time believing that they couldn’t have done this at, oh, 3pm EST. But there we go. Ladies and gentlemen, the justice system. 

    • Anonymous

      Reading about the details I felt so horribly claustrophobic. It seems so capricious, and indeed cruel.

      I don’t know what to tell you about the white kids you know taking up the rallying cry. Personally I posted about the case but I did not say, “I am Troy Davis”, for just the reasons you mentioned. Yet in some way I was amazed how many people did fully identify in solidarity with the fate of a Black man in our justice system. It felt like something new… I guess we will have to wait and see if Davis’ memory lives on and if the people who were touched by this case, go on to try and change the way our system works. 

    • Anonymous

      Reading about the details I felt so horribly claustrophobic. It seems so capricious, and indeed cruel.

      I don’t know what to tell you about the white kids you know taking up the rallying cry. Personally I posted about the case but I did not say, “I am Troy Davis”, for just the reasons you mentioned. Yet in some way I was amazed how many people did fully identify in solidarity with the fate of a Black man in our justice system. It felt like something new… I guess we will have to wait and see if Davis’ memory lives on and if the people who were touched by this case, go on to try and change the way our system works. 

    • Anonymous

      The white kids all over FB and Twitter saying ‘I am Troy Davis’. I understand what they’re doing and I’m certain the cause appreciated all of the solidarity and support it got, but I can’t help but wonder if they understand that they are NOT Troy Davis because this wouldn’t happen to them.

      Actually it could happen to them. Ask Cameron Todd Willingham.

    • Anonymous

      The white kids all over FB and Twitter saying ‘I am Troy Davis’. I understand what they’re doing and I’m certain the cause appreciated all of the solidarity and support it got, but I can’t help but wonder if they understand that they are NOT Troy Davis because this wouldn’t happen to them.

      Actually it could happen to them. Ask Cameron Todd Willingham.

      • Yukiko

        Actually it couldn’t. Class was the issue in Willingham’s death. He was the wrong kind of guy for his whiteness to pay off for him, because he was living in poverty and had a bad reputation.

        • Anonymous

          Actually when it comes to capital punishment, the race of the perceived victim is far more telling than the race of the perceived perpetrator. 

          And it isn’t good for the fight against injustice to automatically de-legitimize people of another race.

    • Anonymous

      THANK YOU

      I am seeing that on tumblr too and people are shutting them down.

    • Anonymous

      THANK YOU

      I am seeing that on tumblr too and people are shutting them down.

    • Anonymous

      I feel like it’s at-least-slightly-preferable to the cheering at mention of how many people Perry has killed.  At least they can envision themselves being in that situation, rather than believing that it only happens to Other people.

    • Anonymous

      I feel like it’s at-least-slightly-preferable to the cheering at mention of how many people Perry has killed.  At least they can envision themselves being in that situation, rather than believing that it only happens to Other people.

    • Anonymous

      While I agree that racism and classism played a huge role in Troy Davis’s execution (and everything that led up to it), I think it is counterproductive to snipe at the “white kids” who took up Davis’s cause. Calling the parole board, educating your friends and family, speaking out in public, none of those things are easy to do. Opposition to capital punishment is not an easy stance to adopt. Everyone questions your belief, especially in a case like this, where people use inflammatory rhetoric about cop killers. Better to applaud the fact that capital punishment and its unethical, unjust application is becoming an issue people of all backgrounds are questioning and fighting.

    • Anon

      If white kids feel that they can relate, how is this a bad thing? Sure, it’s not accurate, but it will certainly have a positive effect and make those people more likely to try to change these things. And those kids are our future. I want them to at least try to relate, shit. Good for them, if they’re serious (I can’t tell, since I don’t know them personally).

      I can understand tons of different reasons to be outrages over this horrible event, certainly including your second point.

    • Mimi10

      I wondered about that too – the tee shirt. I am white and couldn’t see wearing an “I am Troy Davis” tee shirt so I made my own tee shirt that says, “Justice for Troy Davis”.

      As for the Supreme Court – I heard it was all up to Clarence Thomas. What is wrong with that man??? And leaving it like that – intentional cruelty as far as I can tell. 

  • http://rvcbard.blogspot.com RVCBard

    I’m surprised nobody’s rioting, to be honest. This is way more fucked up than Rodney King.

  • http://rvcbard.blogspot.com RVCBard

    I’m surprised nobody’s rioting, to be honest. This is way more fucked up than Rodney King.

  • niffyat

    I feel pretty disgusted with the US Supreme Court and the entire Judicial Branch right about now. I don’t know I was so naive, but I really thought they wouldn’t let this happen tonight.

  • niffyat

    I feel pretty disgusted with the US Supreme Court and the entire Judicial Branch right about now. I don’t know I was so naive, but I really thought they wouldn’t let this happen tonight.

    • Sussabmax

      Yes, I am naive with you–I thought they would stop it. How obvious could it be that there was too much doubt.

      As a white woman, I do not know what it is like to fear that I will be thrown into a “justice” system that sees me as completely disposable, but it seems so obvious to me that there is bias. When you see that the prison population has a much higher black proportion than the general population, when you see laws that punish small amounts of crack at a much harsher rate than larger amounts of cocaine, and when you see how much more likely African Americans are to live I. Poverty or just above and not have the means to defend themselves from false accusations or unjust punishments, it is frightening to me. How can we treat our citizens this way? How can people claim to be pro-Life and support the death penalty, especially when there is so much doubt? How can people be so willing to kill a man with so much doubt over his guilt? What is our country coming to?

      • Sulyp

        “What is our country coming to?”

        Our country isn’t coming to anywhere different.  It’s the same old stuff that this country’s history was built upon.  Despite the lack corroborating witnesses, evidence, weapon, and Troy’s insistence that he was innocent, The System terminated his life anyway.  

        This case highlights what racism is really all about.  It’s not about the individual, though bigotry certainly greases the wheels quite a bit.   It’s about The System that relies upon this imbalance to stay in business.  We are so overdue for a revolution in this country, it’s not even funny.  What’s scary is how much effort our government has spent trying to disable us from using the public space to exercise our right to assemble and protest.  Did you all see the 100+ cops in full riot gear and weapons they dispatched outside the execution?  And those corporations too.  How the hell was Nicole Richie (#2) trending higher in Yahoo searches than Troy Davis (#8) yesterday?

    • TeakLipstickFiend

      I’m also naive. I woke up this morning (I was asleep in France when the execution took place) and checked the news, sure that I would read he had been pardoned. It’s just incredibly sad and abhorrent and makes one feel powerless about the possibility of change.