links for 2011-08-29

  • "'The percentage of people who speak French fluently is about 5%, and 100% speak Creole,' says Chris Low.
    "'So it's really apartheid through language.'
    "Ms Low is co-founder of an experimental school, the Matenwa Community Learning Center, which has broken with tradition, and conducts all classes in Creole.
    "Educating children in French may work for the small elite who are fully bilingual, she argues, but not for the masses."
  • "Can we rewrite our own dictionary and dialogue so that it works for 2012 and beyond? And can we do it without resorting to culinary cop-outs like the melting pot or the salad bowl? Or quaint crutches like 'a patchwork quilt' or a 'collage'? Can we put a time limit on the notion of an 'emerging market' — akin to how long you can use the words "new and improved" in advertising. Haven't we already emerged? Or, are we afraid to come out for fear that upon fully emerging, we will be considered to be blended in — like frozen yogurt once it melts and you smoosh it all about?"
  • "Almost four decades later, the same museum the collective defaced because its doors weren’t open to artists of their kind — Mexican-American, working class and poor, highly irreverent and politicized — is not just finally welcoming them inside but rolling out a red carpet for the occasion."
  • "Stephen Ryan, the chairman of the NSW Aboriginal Land Council, said he was shocked by the behaviour of the men, but more stunned that Qantas ''wouldn't have known such a stunt could backfire … It's hard to believe that a company that has used Aboriginal iconography to try and improve its image didn't know that this could easily be construed as racist.'"
    Ryan said. 'There's nothing funny about the demonisation of indigenous people by non-indigenous people. Never has been, never will be.'"
  • "Duke accused Jews in the media of promoting President Obama, and throughout his speech refers to “real Americans” as European-American people who overwhelmingly did not vote for President Obama and reject him as the country’s leader. Duke claimed the original Boston tea party was a rejection of foreign intervention in America’s government and he goes on to insinuate that the president, Jews, and non-whites are a foreign power who are robbing European Americans of their freedom to rule themselves."
  • "If I’m the lone voice still squeaking out a word of hope, I’m gonna stand up on my soapbox and do just that. I love Black men. Even though I’m frustrated and befuddled right along with my sisters, I’m also not willing to give up on my dream of raising a beautiful Black family, complete with a beautiful Black husband. If that means I’m wasting my time, so be it. But I’d rather tread water in a ship headed to my desired destination than flounder in a lifeboat that’s purely functional."
  • "This is life now for El General. This time last year, he was a 21-year-old university student. He was a big Tupac fan who'd recorded his own raps and posted them online, but even within the microscopic universe of Tunisian rap, hardly anyone knew who he was. Then, on November 7, 2010, he uploaded a song called "Rais Lebled" to Facebook. The date was significant: In Tunisia, November 7 was a national holiday commemorating the moment in 1987 when Prime Minister Zine El Abidine Ben Ali ended the 30-year reign of the previous president, Habib Bourguiba, with a bloodless coup. The song, whose title loosely translates as "President of the Country," is hardly a celebration: Over an eerie synth line and a simple, harrowing beat, El General searingly indicts Ben Ali. "Mr. President, your people are dying," he rhymes in rough, angry Tunisian Arabic. "They are eating garbage." He goes on to rail against police brutality, anti-Islamic policies, and institutionalized kleptocracy."
  • Kat

    The Creole story is interesting to me, cause I am fluent in French and can understand Haitian  Creole perfectly having never learned it. 

  • Kat

    The Creole story is interesting to me, cause I am fluent in French and can understand Haitian  Creole perfectly having never learned it.