links for 2011-08-08

  • "Just some of Shepard’s accusations, published in the highly-respected journal Anthropology News, are: In order to present a ‘false and insulting’ portrayal of the tribe as sex-obsessed, mean and savage, many of the translations of what the Indians are saying are fabricated; [m]any events presented as real in the show must have been ‘staged’; [a] key scene in the show in which Olly is subjected to painful ant stings, since 'according to Matsigenka tradition he must be cleansed' and 'endure the ancient punishments' for buying deer meat is denounced by Shepard as ‘fabricated and [with] no basis in ethnography.’

    "Ron Snell, in an article on his blog, accused the film-makers of ‘paying the Machiguengas to perform for them, saying things the Machiguengas wouldn’t ordinarily say and doing things the Machiguengas wouldn’t normally do.’"

  • "Hinds County District Attorney Robert Shuler Smith says a group of the teens then climbed into their large Ford F250 green pickup truck, floored the gas, and drove the truck right over Anderson, killing him instantly.
    "This was a crime of hate. Dedmon murdered this man because he was black,' said Hinds County District Attorney Robert Shuler Smith. 'The evidence will show that.'"
  • Good on NY Post for this story, but they won't retract their "Hooker" story about Nafissatou Diallo, the woman who come forth about Dominique Strauss-Kahn allegedly raping her? Hmph.–AJP "Faruq 'Peter' Wells–who worked on the 'Today' show, 'Dr. Oz' and 'Late Night With Jimmy Fallon'–endured the abuse after returning from a vacation and eventually quit his job when NBC's Human Resources Department told him to ignore the problem, the court papers charge.

    "The worst indignity came when one co-worker pelted him with the doll and barked, 'Here's your long-lost daughter!' the papers say."

  • "Ms. White never achieved the stardom she hoped for and believed she deserved. One issue—the larger one—was a paucity of roles for black actors, period, no matter the shade or hue of their skin, she told The New York Times in 1968. 'We have one Sidney Poitier and one Diana Sands, and bang!—the door closes,' she said."

    "The situation became only more complicated for mixed-race actors like herself, she said. As she wrote in a 1992 essay, light-skinned actors of her time were still routinely dismissed as too white for black parts. They had to lighten their complexions for white parts and, in the case of light-skinned women appearing opposite black men, darken their appearance lest the black man 'seem to be involved with a white girl—horrors!'"

  • I'm not feeling this piece because it seems to be that old parlor game, Police the Race/Ethnicity. But this may be my own interpretation. Thoughts?–AJP "[N]ow they’ve found the perfect 'white lie.' They can use to it drive home the point that she is brown, that despite those blue power suits and that nice all-American National Guard husband, she is different, not one of them. They can now do it without being accused of playing race politics. They are hoping this might mark the beginning of the end for this particular shooting star story. Haley’s comet — the new face of the American South — now revealed to be an optical illusion. Now she’s brown, now she’s not."
  • Anonymous

    re: Nikki Haley 
    I agree it’s another round of that parlor game of policing the race/ethnicity. Self-identification comprises two things: it’s personal and it doesn’t have to be consistent, because an incident or conversation can alter one’s feelings or thoughts on self-identification along the way and it can happen often. 

    Some might exploit their background to advance their career or lend a better appearance of authenticity, but it’s still a personal issue and it might be in accordance with what they know or believe. Some people of Indian ancestry view themselves as white and some others view themselves as South Asian. Neither is wrong. 

  • Kit M.

    Thank you for the Jane White link. I had the great pleasure of interviewing her for research I was conducting. She was gracious, frank, and fascinating.