links for 2011-07-26

  • "They are the more than one million migrants who, fleeing from poverty, took to the road with no heed for the danger, even of losing their lives. Labeled as illegal, they defied the imperialist authorities and, after much sacrifice, arrived in the United States. Their remittances, beyond being a help for their families, are basic to the national economy.
    According to the analyst, Honduras’ macroeconomic balance came about beginning in 1994 as a result of the remittances from migrants and reached a peak in 1998, with the passing of hurricane Mitch.

    "Until 1998, Honduras was receiving 600 million lempiras [about 31 million US dollars] in remittances, but that natural event not only brought about the disaster of the moment but even revealed what had been happening all along. 'And it seems that that touched the migrants and they took on the habits of the Salvadorans, who had been the greatest source of remittances for their country, and then they began to send remittances,' he said."

  • "The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. may not have had Camden Cove in mind when he spoke at the foot of the Lincoln Memorial on Aug. 28, 1963. But in that neighborhood, both symbolic and real progress is turning his dream into a reality for some.

    "But that change is not uniform. There are still plenty of neighborhoods today where all the faces are the same color, often defined as much by income as by race.

  • "OK, see if you can wrap your head around the (racist) logic here. Kymberly Wimberly was the top student at McGehee Secondary School in Little Rock, Arkansas. So, the school named her valedictorian. And then shortly after that they decided to name a co-valedictorian. Why? Because the other student had equally as high a GPA? Nope. The reason it seems has to do with the fact that Wimberly is a black student."
  • Shoutouts to Tami, Los Angelista, and Renee at Womanist Musings!–AJP "Blogger Los Angelista explained her response to a woman's incredulous 'Are you serious, I can't touch your hair?' by writing that no she couldn't, 'Because my black ancestors may have been your ancestors' property, and had to smile while they got touched in ways they didn't want to, but I am not YOUR property and never will be so you'd best move your hand away from me.'"
  • "I was excited for the panel, considering I am frequently frustrated by the media’s exploitative use of women (whether it be the host of a show, such as Olivia Munn, or booth babes at E3) to appeal to a market that they treat as exclusively male.  However, my expectations were quickly dashed when discussion of media literacy was tossed aside in favor of accusations of jealousy.  Bonnie Burton and Adrianne Curry mused that women who were critical of sexy geek culture in any way were just jealous, had no confidence, and were projecting their issues with self-esteem onto the women who felt empowered by walking the Comic-Con floor in a Slave Leia costume."
  • nicthommi

    The fact of the matter is, we all have agency over our own bodies.  My hair is in fact part of my body.  And no, you cannot touch it.   I do not wish to let people play cultural tourist in my hair.  You can’t touch any part of me just because you are curious or because you find it interesting or pretty (because if a compliment is all it takes, can’t a man cop a feel of a nice butt or nice breasts if he asks first and says that he likes them?)

    We don’t know anyone’s motives for wanting to touch our hair, but there is no other situation where someone would act as if an adult human should let a stranger touch him out of curiosity or because you’d paid him or her a compliment.  If anyone asked, I would say no and let them know why.  Some people might find it pretty, but others do think that you are less than them or have other nasty ideas that they are trying to confirm by touching you.

    I had actually read the story on another blog and knew the WHOLE story, and I too was really disappointed to read black women on natural hair blogs criticizing the story in such a sloppy manner.   It’s sad that these young women are so in need of approval of non-black women that they act as though none of us has a right to say no.  And you really don’t know how many of the people who are asking to touch you really think of you as being some nasty other species, no matter what they say to your face.  I personally think that the reaction that Los Angelista got to saying no to that white women is not that unique.  I did not read the CNN comments because I’ve had my fill of people using the anonymity of the internet to say that they really feel about black people, and especially black women (the amount of hatred and vitriol that is directed at us makes me physically ill.)

    The world has over 6 billion people. We come in so many shapes, and sizes, and colors.  I’m not sure that Asians are expected to let people touch their eyes because they differ so much from Western eyes.  So why would anyone suggest that black people need to let anyone touch our hair.  We aren’t the only people with curly, big or frizzy hair, although maybe at the extreme ends of the hair spectrum, some people’s hair might be very unique.

  • nicthommi

    The fact of the matter is, we all have agency over our own bodies.  My hair is in fact part of my body.  And no, you cannot touch it.   I do not wish to let people play cultural tourist in my hair.  You can’t touch any part of me just because you are curious or because you find it interesting or pretty (because if a compliment is all it takes, can’t a man cop a feel of a nice butt or nice breasts if he asks first and says that he likes them?)

    We don’t know anyone’s motives for wanting to touch our hair, but there is no other situation where someone would act as if an adult human should let a stranger touch him out of curiosity or because you’d paid him or her a compliment.  If anyone asked, I would say no and let them know why.  Some people might find it pretty, but others do think that you are less than them or have other nasty ideas that they are trying to confirm by touching you.

    I had actually read the story on another blog and knew the WHOLE story, and I too was really disappointed to read black women on natural hair blogs criticizing the story in such a sloppy manner.   It’s sad that these young women are so in need of approval of non-black women that they act as though none of us has a right to say no.  And you really don’t know how many of the people who are asking to touch you really think of you as being some nasty other species, no matter what they say to your face.  I personally think that the reaction that Los Angelista got to saying no to that white women is not that unique.  I did not read the CNN comments because I’ve had my fill of people using the anonymity of the internet to say that they really feel about black people, and especially black women (the amount of hatred and vitriol that is directed at us makes me physically ill.)

    The world has over 6 billion people. We come in so many shapes, and sizes, and colors.  I’m not sure that Asians are expected to let people touch their eyes because they differ so much from Western eyes.  So why would anyone suggest that black people need to let anyone touch our hair.  We aren’t the only people with curly, big or frizzy hair, although maybe at the extreme ends of the hair spectrum, some people’s hair might be very unique.

  • Melissa Lynnette

    Don’t. Touch. My. Hair.
    I’m not your pet. You’re not at the zoo. I’m not an exhibit. What the fuck is wrong with people?
    It boggles my mind the number of times I’ve had to deal with “curiosity” about my hair in my life. Nowadays I tell them to go watch Good Hair and leave me alone.

    • Anonymous

      Nowadays I tell them to go watch Good Hair and leave me alone.

      May I bite this?

    • Anonymous

      Nowadays I tell them to go watch Good Hair and leave me alone.

      May I bite this?

  • Anonymous

    Re: touching strangers’ hair. WTF?  That ‘s incredibly rude and I’m sure often racist.  Also maybe some fetish mixed in for some of the offenders? Which is not okay to play out on a stranger. 

    Re: Comic-Con panel. I stopped watching when G4 and TechTV merged. That guy’s remarks were vile and I wish more people had confronted him about them, but he won’t be reprimanded or disciplined by his network because that’s the atmosphere they encourage.

    Seth Green is AWESOME!  Yay!  I also see Tim Daley and another guy whom I don’t recognize in the PSA.

  • dersk

    With the valedictorian issue – at my high school it was purely GPA, but according to wikipedia some schools use a combination of criteria (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valedictorian). The article didn’t say how that particular high school did its selection, but I find it a bit odd that they didn’t mention that Wimberly is also a mother. So, it could be more complicatd – but if they have a record of giving valedictorian strictly on GPA, they got some explaining to do.

    I still can’t believe that anyone would ever think it’s okay just to touch a stranger’s hair without asking. Not sure how LA’s quote was taken out of context, but it seems like an absolutely reasonable point to me to help understand why a black woman might find even the question offensive.

  • Soulsentwined

    CNN completely quoted Los Angelista out of context and this misinformation has spread like wildfire. Two natural hair blogs I read condemned her and accused her of playing the race card. I will no longer subscribe to those blogs because they clearly do not support black women’s right to personal agency.

    • Anonymous

      Since Los Angelista has been a guest contributor at the R, we welcome hearing from *her* what her exact quote is as far as what she said during the CNN interview.

      Until she’s good and ready to do that, I’m with dersk–I think what she said was absolute reasonable. And well-stated.

    • Lee

      Even out of context what she said seems perfectly acceptable to me.  It’s not so much misinformation as that some people apparently think you need a “good” reason to tell someone not to touch you. Any reason is acceptable. Or no reason at all.