links for 2011-07-13

  • "George Washington, who represented BAMN in the Sixth Circuit said, 'The Sixth Circuit held that Michigan could not manipulate the political process by making it impossible for racial minorities to seek admission programs that benefited them while allowing every other group to seek any admission program that they wanted.'”
  • "The recession from 2007 to 2009 has hit nearly all sectors and communities in the American economy, but minorities, and particularly African Americans, may have been affected the most. Jesse Washington’s recent Associated Press story about how the recession reversed many of the economic gains that took the black community many years to attain contains some grim statistics: in 2009, the average black household had only 2 cents for every dollar of wealth held by the average white household, and in April 2010, black male unemployment hit its highest point since the government began tracking it in 1972.

    “'History is going to say that the black middle class was decimated,' Maya Wiley, director of the Center for Social Inclusion, tells Washington. 'But we’re not done writing history.'”

  • "'It gives the ICE trial attorney the ability to do the right thing,' says David Leopold, president of the American Immigration Lawyers Association. 'They can look at the person on the other side of the courtroom table, and evaluate them as a human being with individual circumstances.' This sounds good in theory, but other advocates say that such discretion could be exercised unevenly. And it comes long after an immigrant may have been unfairly singled out by police. 'This reform happens five steps down the road,' notes Sunita Patel, a staff attorney with the Center for Constitutional Rights, 'once the person is already detained, once they may have already waived their rights, once the harm has already been done.'”
  • "'I think they are just avoiding Arizona,” said Jesse Hernández, a real estate agent who works in the Maryvale neighborhood where the exodus of immigrants, due to the crackdown on illegal immigration and the implosion of the housing market, is especially visible. 'They are going to California and other places. No matter how much worse things are in the U.S., they are still coming over here. It’s a human interest to look for a better opportunity.' Beyond SB 1070, says Krikorian, Arizona’s experience with another immigration law pushed immigrants away. That was an employer sanctions law passed in 2007 that made it mandatory for businesses to use a federal database known as E-Verify to check the immigration status of their new hires and also made them subject to penalties if they knowingly hired unauthorized workers."
  • "According to the feds, Portland's Grant High, whose 375 African American students gave it the largest African American enrollment of any Oregon high school, didn't have a single black student in calculus that year. Grant did have a handful of African American students take physics, and it had 85 students take calculus — all of them white, Asian or Latino."