Slutwalk – To March or Not to March

By Guest Contributor Harsha Walia, cross-posted from Rabble.ca

“When we speak we are afraid our words will not be heard or welcomed. But when we are silent, we are still afraid. So it is better to speak.”
— Audre Lorde

Since April, when thousands marched in a Slutwalk in Toronto in response to a police officer telling students that the best way to avoid getting raped was to avoid dressing like a ‘slut’, Slutwalks have spread across cities in Canada and the US to the UK and Australia. Accompanying this global surge has been a myriad of controversies about the term ‘slut’ as well as questions about who was being left out from this new movement.

I share many of these concerns.

Slutwalk – in its slick branding – runs the risk of facilitating the dominant discourse of ‘liberated’ women as only those women wearing mini-skirts and high heels in/on their way to professional jobs. In reality, capitalism mediates the feminist façade of choice by creating an entire industry that commodifies women’s sexuality and links a woman’s self-esteem and self-worth to fashion and beauty. Slutwalk itself consistently refuses any connection to feminism and fixates solely around liberal questions of individual choice – the palatable “I can wear what I want” feminism that is intentionally devoid of an analysis of power dynamics.

Historically, this has come at a great cost to low-income women and women of colour who bear the brunt of institutionalized sexism – from lack of access to childcare and denial of reproductive justice to stratification in precarious low-wage work and disproportionate criminalization. In the post 9/11 climate, the focus on a particular version of sex(y)-positive feminism runs the risk of further marginalizing Muslim women’s movements who are hugely impacted by the racist ‘reasonable accommodation’ debate and state policies against the niqab. This marginalization has, at least in part, been legitimized through an imperialist feminist discourse that imposes certain ideas of gender liberation and perpetuates the myth that certain cultural/religious identities are inherently antithetical to women’s rights.

According to Nassim Elbardouh, a community organizer and Muslim woman who grew up in Saskatoon, “Though I support the tremendous effort, I didn’t go to Slutwalk because rather than focusing on lack of consent in sexual assault, there seemed to be a message that I have heard since I was a young girl – that I am only a feminist under the White gaze if I dressed and behaved in certain exposing and forward ways. People need to realize that being ‘scantily clad’ is not the only patriarchal excuse that victimizes women. Sexual assaults against Muslim women are often minimized in our society because Muslim women are perceived as repressed, and therefore in need of sexual emancipation. I would much rather have attended a ‘Do Not Rape’ Walk.”

On the use of the term ‘slut’ itself, while I appreciate that others feel differently and there is an argument to be made about transgressing the social boundaries defined by the term ‘slut’, I personally don’t feel the whole ‘reclaim slut’ thing. I find that the term disproportionately impacts women of colour and poor women in order to reinforce their status as inherently dirty and second-class, and hence more rape-able. The history of genocide against Indigenous women, the enslavement of Black women, and the forced sterilization of poor women goes beyond their attire. It is a means of gender control that is embedded within the intersecting processes of racism and colonialism. As long-term activists with Incite Women of Color have pointed out, the experience of women of colour with violence and victim-blaming is not only quantitatively different (i.e. increased) but is also qualitatively different.

Racist and sexist terminology like ‘squaw’ continues to particularly demean Indigenous women living in poverty. The systemic ideology that upholds the colonial disposability of Indigenous women’s bodies and lives has normalized the tragedy of thousands of missing and murdered Indigenous women across this country. As a Manitoba Judge stated during the inquiry into the death of 19-year old Helen Betty Osborne “the men who abducted Osborne believed that young Aboriginal women were objects with no human value beyond sexual gratification.”

One of the organizers of the Vancouver Slutwalk admitted in a Tyee interview that many marginalized women did not feel comfortable marching: “We will speak to the fact that we need to recognize that there are groups that are more affected, who will not be as strongly represented at this march as they should be.”

Having said all that, it might be surprising, then, to know that I did march in Slutwalk.

I attended for the simple reason that I am committed to ending victim-blaming. The Slutwalks in Toronto and Vancouver came out of the specific contexts of comments by police officers in Toronto and Saanich that were reinforcing to young women about how to avoid getting raped. In Manitoba, Judge Robert Dewar commented that a young Aboriginal rape survivor acted “inviting”.

Even though I did not march under the banner of ‘sluthood’, I marched to mark the unceded territory of women’s bodies. I marched because language is a weapon yielded against the powerless. I marched because rapists causes rape and sexual assault can never be justified. I marched to end the policing of women by other women. I marched because that day, though understandable, I happened to be tired of the Left ruthlessly eating itself alive. I marched in defiance of right-wing pundits like Margaret Wente to make visible the staggering reality of rape and violence against all women in so-called civilized countries like Canada.

By the time Slutwalk hit Vancouver on May 15, the debates had already been raging for weeks. I expected to see only a handful of women of colour, mothers and children, older women. I was surprised at the actual diversity on the streets, not captured by photographers seeking sensationalist images of bras and fish nets. There was no attempt to recruit everyone into one uniform vision of feminity, nor was there an overarching romanticization of “sluttiness”; sexual autonomy was being self-determined by each participant– as one placard read ‘Whether scantily dressed or fully dressed, clothing does not equal consent’. Most heartening was the significant number of teenagers, who are perhaps most pressured against affirming consent and are most impacted by self-shame and victim-blaming, and supporting their voices on the street was a critical gesture of solidarity.

While Slutwalk may like to present itself as a movement, I would argue that it isn’t. Rather, it is simply one part of a broader movement to end violence against women. Similarly, my reflection is just that – one person’s rant in a wider spectrum of opinion. It does not (pejoratively) imply that I am a “sister who fell for Slutwalk”, nor does it imply my uncritical endorsement. As Berthold Brecht said “In the contradiction lies the hope.” Whether or not Slutwalk is around, there are hundreds of thousands of us, who continue to live and organize everyday to eliminate heteropatriarchy, white supremacy, capitalism and colonialism.

Photo courtesy of CNN

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  • http://marytracy.blogspot.com MaryTracy

    This post is full of truth. And that quote by Nassim Elbardouh is precious.

    Amids all this talk of SlutWalk I cannot help but feeling that the work of countless feminists to end violence against women are made invisible because their protests did not have the word “slut” on them.

  • http://twitter.com/DYomoah Doreen Yomoah

    This is a really great analysis! Thank you for writing, Harsha.

  • Lele

    I think there is another point that should be brought up and that is
    the issue of white sexuality. White female sexuality has been
    (historically and residually) presented as normative and desirable,
    while the sexuality of WOCs are presented differently (desexualized,
    hypersexualized, fetishized, etc) and therefore we do not share the same
    issues vis a vis how our sexuality is treated.

    Therefore, I understand why many WOCs felt uneasy about being used as
    fodder for the reclamation of (what would benefit) white female
    sexuality. White women have the privilege (among other privileges) of
    having their sexuality be normative. This is just another example of how
    the issues facing WOC and white women differ and how our ideas of
    feminism are NOT the same, hence our hesitation in joining this movement.
     

  • Lele

    I think there is another point that should be brought up and that is
    the issue of white sexuality. White female sexuality has been
    (historically and residually) presented as normative and desirable,
    while the sexuality of WOCs are presented differently (desexualized,
    hypersexualized, fetishized, etc) and therefore we do not share the same
    issues vis a vis how our sexuality is treated.

    Therefore, I understand why many WOCs felt uneasy about being used as
    fodder for the reclamation of (what would benefit) white female
    sexuality. White women have the privilege (among other privileges) of
    having their sexuality be normative. This is just another example of how
    the issues facing WOC and white women differ and how our ideas of
    feminism are NOT the same, hence our hesitation in joining this movement.
     

    • Ladyguerita

      EXACTLY!!!!!  I read”Female Chauvinist Pigs and I was thinking ‘”foe a woman of color we are already sexauiled, if  we do the same thing as the women in the book we are promting a stereotype of ourselves.
      Think about it.
      The Jezebel stereotype for African American women.
       Dragon Lady for Asian women
      The  spicy Latina.
      We are already sexualiled , we rarely hear about rape/abuse victims of color. Rarely  are we seen as a nerdy girl, the virgin or the “smart girl”. We are seen as maids, bar girls, and sex dolls.
       A Caucasian  woman can talk about how talking a strip pole dance is” empowering” but if I take I will end up prompting the image hyper-sexual Latina.

  • http://mclicious.wordpress.com/ McLicious

    Great essay! thanks. I didn’t know much about slutwalk, but when I heard about it, I did think it sounded kind of cool, in terms of empowering victims and ending victim blaming. This is really good insight, though, and I’m glad there were people out there representing that there are many different ways to take back “slut.” I think Slutwalk could have the potential to go out of its microcosm of college and yuppie middle and upper class women and be a sort of Bitchwalk, Howalk, Welfaremomwalk, etc, and take back all of those pejoratives, if more people were willing to hold up the “clothing does not equal consent” signs or others, “being ceo doesn’t mean I’m a bitch” and that sort of thing.

  • http://crommunist.wordpress.com/ Crommunist

     Good work. I was also at Vancouver’s SlutWalk and my position was much the same – the concept that INFORMS the word ‘slut’ needs to be the focus, not simply the word itself. While I had my own problems, I was happy to be part of it despite its shortcomings.

  • Anonymous

     At the end of the day I doubt it matters what you wear or do. Any can become a victim. The policemen are very said people. Sworn to protect citizens, but obviously not all of them equally. They would use rape myths to encourage a state of fear and disenfranchisement in a male-run society. All of these marches and walks I keep hearing about make me want to go. I definitely want to attend a march for reproductive justice. 

  • Mina

    I logged on to Racialicious to chance upon this article and the one on angry black women, I applaud both. The author has articulated many of the concerns/issues that I have with specific streams of post-feminism and with issues attached to the act of marginalized groups reclaiming derogatory terms.

  • Jane

    I think applying the slur ”slut” to ourselves is a bad idea, even if done in an ironic fashion, It just makes the misogynists laugh - ”Oh yeah! I love sluts!” (just look at the original Slutwalk’s facebook wall). It does nothing to undermine the patriarchy. Why bother “reclaiming” a word which describes something that doesn’t exist? There’s no such thing as a slut, except in the misogynist patriarchal narrative. I’d rather march in a “No Woman Is a Slut” walk.

    • Anonymous

      Amen to that!  

    • culturegeek

      Fourth-wave feminism raises some very thorny issues of what is reclaiming sexual agency and what is acquiescence to the commodification  of our sexuality– but I would still rather attend an imperfect event than do nothing.  That being said, I’ve never been a fan of the word “slut,” so perhaps I will get together a group of “she-studs” to go to the DC Slutwalk in August.