SXSW Panels

by Latoya Peterson

OMG PEOPLE!

THEY MADE US A MOVIE!

Me and Miriam are hoping this movie isn’t queer distancing, but queer and subversive, but we can’t tell that from the trailer. It could really go either way.

Either way, my whole crew is coming to the premiere tonight 9:30 PM at the Paramount Theater. If you’re around come through – according to some film folks I talked to yesterday, you can buy tickets even if you aren’t registered for SXSW.

Panel list after the jump.

Our panel is at 12:30, Saturday:

“Tech Power to the People”
#TP2P

How do we ensure no one is left behind in the tech revolution? This panel is designed to provide a look into the best practices for using media to engage with communities, particularly minority outreach and low income/low access areas. This panel will feature a variety of activists explaining the ways in which they have used mobile campaigns, apps, blogs, and other methods to engage their communities and transfer skills, as well as tips for evaluation and measuring results.


Diversity and Race Related Panels

Common Ground: Crime, Drugs, Racism and Reconciliation – David M. Kennedy Solo Talk

The Elevation of Black Women in New Media – Panel with Angela Benton of Black Web 2.0, Deanna Sutton of Clutch Magazine Online, and other successful web entrepreneurs

Mobile Health in Africa: What Can We Learn? – Panel with Particia Mechael of Center for Global Health and Economic Development, Douglas Naegele of Infield Health, and  Jaspal Sanhu of Gobee Group

How to Ensure a Diverse Tech Event -  Erica Mauter solo talk on barriers to entry in tech

E-Race: Avatars, Anonymity, and The Virtualiziation of Identity – Panel with Jeff Yang (Asian Pop), Lisa Nakamura (digital race scholar), and W James Au (Second Life) on race and identity online.

Latinas in Technology: Beauty, Brains, and Blogging – Kety Esquivel on Latina influence online

Related Interests

Connecting America: The National Broadband Plan One Year Later – Discussing the FCC’s broadband plan and innovation

COPS 3.0 – The Future of Policing and the Internet
– How police are using the internet to gather intelligence and move law enforcement online.

Friend Panels

Twanna Hines, Deanna Zandt, Cheryl Contee, – People Power: Leveraging Personal Stories to Build Influence

Anjuan Simmons – What Comic Books Can Teach Mobile Application Designers

J.Brotherlove – How to Rawk SXSW

Lynne Johnson – Augmented Reality for Marketers: Future of Consumer Interactions

…and much much more. Stay tuned!

  • http://tenacitustirades.blogspot.com/ tenacitus

    I think I would be so there for this film. It reminds me of a younger, dorkier version of myself.

  • Anonymous

    I’m both excited and cautious concerning the film. For the reasons you mentioned as well as some others. Ultimately I’m glad that it was made. We need more films and not less. We need more images, voices, ideas, and different types of characters to strike a balance. So that black faces are a lot more human than they are now. Please review the film!!

    One criticism is that there doesn’t seem to be a lot of women of color among the friend and peer groups, or at least women with some melanin in their skin. It’s cool that we have black and Asian interactions and Latino interactions though. And the protagonist seems very complex. The Latina is cool. I like her characteristics as kind of a female underdog. Definitely breaks the stereotypical mold. I’m worried there will be a token queer/gay character and that as you said it will be queer distancing. Using queerness as the butt-end of a joke.

    The music was very stereotypical, as far as what I can remember from previous white indie films I’ve seen in the past. But we can wait and see what they’ll do with the musical score.

    But I do have a film recommendation. Black indie film with notable cast members such as Traci Thoms and Blair Underwood (love him, he deserves much better roles than what he’s been handed in the past–they always seem to typecast him as villain, abusive lover, jilted lover, etc.). It’s called “I Will Follow.”

    http://afrolistasandthecity.blogspot.com/2011/03/i-will-follow-theatrical-trailer.html

    I am also looking forward to watching “Mississippi Damned” which involves black gay/lesbian persons. Finally queued it on Netflix, haha.

  • http://tenacitustirades.blogspot.com/ tenacitus

    From the trailer I think of a younger, dorkier me. I so want to see it.

  • Dr. Ivo Robotnik

    We have a rarity here in the size acceptance realm as well- a movie about a nerdy guy who’s not thin. It seems like such a difficult concept to imagine a realistic fat outcast with an actual personality who isn’t just guzzling junk food and making the thin star look better by comparison like some crappy MadTV sketch.

    I will definitely be seeing this.

  • caro

    That looks really good! I might just venture downtown.

    Here’s the general lowdown on getting into movies for SXSW:

    All badge holders get in first.
    Once all badgeholders in line are in, film pass holders are allowed in. (Any badgeholder that shows up at this point is allowed directly in and cut in line.)
    If seats are still available in the theater 15 minutes or so before the show starts, individual tickets will be sold at the box office.

    A new twist for this year:

    The Paramount (maybe not other venues) is pre-selling a set allotment of tickets to some shows. However, they don’t do web sales the day of (it’s a standard and slightly irritating thing with the Paramount) but you can still go to the box office and buy a ticket as long as there are still some of the allotment available. I don’t know where in the line-standing priority those ticket holders will go, though I’d guess that they only sell those for shows that they don’t anticipate selling out.

    The Paramount’s a great place to see movies, though the seats aren’t terribly comfortable and it’s always cold! Bring a sweater.

  • http://twitter.com/JasVicious Giggity.

    kinda pumped for this…. just hope its done “right”…. hell i dont even know what that means anymore.