links for 2010-11-16

  • "'Now it's become this archive where all the people in the neighborhood, African-Americans, are not welcomed,' O'Brien said. 'They don't want to hear the low-income black history because it indicts the African-American politicians,' he said."
  • "Arab Americans might even make Detroit a global crossroads. As Miami has become a link between the Americas and as San Francisco and Seattle have connected the U.S. with Asian countries, so Detroit has become a conduit to the Muslim world, notes the 2007 Wayne State University study of the Detroit community. You can already find that potential in small notices. On the website ArabDetroit.com, a linguistics company posts help-wanted ads to recruit translators from the local population to help the U.S. military in Iraq: 'Together,' reads the ad, wwe can rebuild a nation, heal communities …'"
  • "Ultimately, even though the law is not the whole answer to cyber racism, it must be a critical part of the answer. Without the ultimate sanction of the law, the scourge of cyber racism will continue to grow unchecked. Like other contemporary scourges, such as terrorism and environmental degradation, cyber racism operates across national boundaries and governments acting individually cannot deal with it effectively."
  • "Many of the country’s leading civil rights organizations are siding with the phone and cable companies in their bid to prevent federal regulations over their broadband, or high-speed, Internet services. At stake: whether to preserve “network neutrality” — the longstanding principle that all consumers can access whatever websites or applications they want on the Internet, at the same speed and without limitations imposed by Internet service providers.

    "Clouding the issue, however, is that more than half a dozen of these groups are fighting accusations of being bought off by the telecom industry. Records of telecom contributions to minority interests reveal a minimum of nearly $2 billion in cash and in-kind support made in the past decade by the top three providers — AT&T, Verizon, and Comcast."

  • "The word 'India' now refers in many quarters to outsourcing. On the Ed Schulz show they joked that if you call customer service, you get a guy called Ralph on the phone. 'What he means is Rajiv,' the commentators laughed. NBC has a new sitcom called 'Outsourced', which follows the travails of Todd Demsey, who prefers to relocate to India rather than get fired. He has to train his call centre Indian colleagues in the ways of America. On NBC, the show follows 'The Office', which is an American adaptation of the successful British comedy. 'The Office' is an anxiety-ridden show, where the pathetic characters glide between comedic shenanigans and the horror of being laid off. 'Outsourced' picks up the thread right after 'The Office' ends, and it takes us to the outer limits of disquiet for the white-collar American worker."
  • "Racism toward African asylum seekers, fueled by politicians and Jewish religious leaders, is reaching new levels in Israel. In several cities Rabbis are urging Jews not to rent apartments to Africans, and African refugees are presented as a national security threat by Israeli politicians. The proposed solutions to this so-called 'threat' include mass forced-deportations to Africa and transferring asylum seekers to a large tent city for the entire duration of their stay in Israel."
  • "Jackson's shooting in the city of Marion set off a protest march at nearby Selma that became known as "Bloody Sunday" when troopers and deputies attacked marchers after they crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge over the Alabama River. The violence galvanized the movement, and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., who preached at Jackson's funeral, later led the Selma-to-Montgomery march that was completed and prompted passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

    "Fowler was sentenced to six months in jail in Geneva County, his home county."

  • "The Justice Department report, describing what it calls 'the government’s collaboration with persecutors,' says that O.S.I investigators learned that some of the Nazis 'were indeed knowingly granted entry' to the United States, even though government officials were aware of their pasts. 'America, which prided itself on being a safe haven for the persecuted, became — in some small measure — a safe haven for persecutors as well,' it said."
  • "Demanding “our fair share,” Manitobans did something hard to imagine in American politics, where concern over illegal immigrants dominates public debate and states seek more power to keep them out. In Canada, which has little illegal immigration, Manitoba won new power to bring foreigners in, handpicking ethnic and occupational groups judged most likely to stay. This experiment in designer immigration has made Winnipeg a hub of parka-clad diversity — a blue-collar town that gripes about the cold in Punjabi and Tagalog — and has defied the anti-immigrant backlash seen in much of the world."