links for 2010-06-13

  • This article shines a light on the often-overlooked impact of social policy on the unique positioning of black women. In her classic work Black Feminist Thought, Patricia Hill Collins wrote, “Oppression cannot be reduced to one fundamental type, and that oppressions work together in producing injustice.” In particular, Hill Collins noted the unique perspective of the black woman due to their intersectional understanding of oppression. The dominant narrative of gender is that of the white, middle class woman while the dominant race narrative is that of the black man, thus suppressing black women within their already established categories of oppression. It is this dual subordination that facilitates a clearer understanding of the relationships among systems of oppression.
  • Five days after the Arizona measure became law, the Massachusetts House came close to passing a Republican proposal to block public benefits for illegal immigrants. A similar bill failed overwhelmingly just a year earlier. But supporters said the Arizona law — and pockets of anger here over the case of President Obama’s Kenyan aunt, who had been living in public housing in Boston while fighting a deportation order — turned the tide. “It’s all part of the same stew we’re in,” said Representative Denise Provost, a Democrat from Somerville who said her office was inundated with hostile calls after she voted against the crackdown in April. “It’s partly Arizona, partly the economy, partly radio show hosts being obsessed with these issues.”
  • It was supposed to be a fun trip for a group of men from Milwaukee. They went to the Chippewa Flowage in Northern Wisconsin, but ran into trouble. "I will say this until they day I die; we were singled out because of our color," says Johnnie McGlaston. The DNR claims they got a tip the group was over the fishing limit. The agency claims the men had caught more than 2,200 fish. "It is common, we're finding that people do cheat on their limits but grossly overbagging to the extent that these folks did is not as common," says one DNR representative. The men admit they made a mistake and didn't understand all the rules, but they claim they saw other groups with just as many fish.
  • A first-time Indian director, Rakesh Ranjan Kumar, has announced that he will make a movie about Adolf Hitler. Dear Friend Hitler stars Indian actors Anupam Kher and Neha Dhupia as Hitler and Eva Braun, and will focus on what the director claims was "Hitler's love for India and how he indirectly contributed to Indian independence". Western productions have occasionally attempted to make fun of Hitler, ranging from successes like The Producers to fiascos like Heil Honey, I'm Home. But Dear Friend Hitler is not a traditional Bollywood musical, and makes no claim to comedy. "It aims to capture the personality of Adolf Hitler and his insecurities, his charisma and his paranoia during the last few days of his life," Kumar says. In other words, this is Downfall – but with a positive spin.
  • But there’s plenty more political fútbol: “Samuel Eto’o believes the World Cup in South Africa can help to diminish the racism that has blighted European football,” the Guardian reported after an interview with Cameroon’s captain, who has long complained about racist fans in Spain and Italy. “Most people only see Africa in terms of poverty and war, famine and disease. But this World Cup gives us the chance to show something different. I think the whole world is going to be really surprised by Africa. This could be the best World Cup in history.”
  • And the award for timeliest social science research goes to… Tim Wadsworth of UC Boulder. In the wake of Arizona’s passage of SB1070, the toughest state ban on illegal immigration to date, Wadsworth’s research finds that cities with the largest increases in immigrants from 1990-2000 experienced the largest reductions in violent crime. Wadsworth tests an earlier argument made in Contexts (and elsewhere) by Rob Sampson of Harvard.
  • Five current or former New Orleans police officers were charged Friday in the shooting death and burning of a New Orleans man during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. According to earlier published reports, police were using a school as a temporary headquarters on Sept. 2, 2005, when a group of men drove up looking for help for 31-year-old Henry Glover, who had been shot. One of the men reportedly later told investigators that Glover was still in the back seat when a police officer drove off with his car. Glover's burned remains later were recovered from the charred car when it turned up on a levee near a police station.