links for 2010-04-03

  • "I have, for some time, been referring to a particularly irritating brand of privileged semi-feminism as “Liz Lemonism.” I associate this brand of feminism with a certain variety of white, coastal-city dwelling, fairly well-to-do heterosexual cisgendered woman, a woman with a comfortable white-collar job that is so very comfortable and so very white-collar that she is free to spend her spare time yearning for, and semi-believing that she could attain, something with more “meaning.” This woman doesn’t do Blogspot, but she does do Tumblr; she doesn’t do posts about sex workers’ rights, but she does do complaining about “raunch culture”; she doesn’t do anti-racism, disability activism, or trans ally work to any huge extent, but she does do “body image” (and oh, does she ever do body image, without taking much note of the fact that as a white, abled, cis person she conforms to the “beauty standard,” and benefits from conforming to it, in more ways than she will ever let on)"
  • "[Presenter] Owens’s suggestion that Hip-Hop could replace the theoretical models of Freud and Foucault opened the audience up to the idea that this cultural and musical medium could have academic relevance. While Freud and Foucault have been integral to the development of a white feminist’s discourse that articulates the dynamics of their systemic oppression, her argument contends that their theories are only accessible to the privileged and educated (white). Hip-Hop, however, is presented as a cultural space that is ideally suited to combating the subjugation of Black women and serves as an instrument of change and resistance. When the enthusiastic applause and boisterous shouts subsided, the audience lingered, digesting the implications of Owens’s argument. Her presentation left a lasting impression: Hip-Hop can be a viable and credible means for academic study and the advancement of Black feminist theory."
  • "Juvenile court judges cannot jail delinquent foster kids in county lockups just to keep the kids from running away, a Miami appeals court ruled Wednesday, ending a years-old practice that authorities have employed to protect runaway kids from themselves."
  • "Smiley zeros in on King’s April 4, 1967, speech, in which he first publicly criticized the war, drawing scorn from a wide swath of news media and from the White House. Many had urged King to avoid the growing public debate about Vietnam. They feared — rightly, it turns out — that King would alienate important allies in the civil rights movement and distract from his central campaign against racial justice. King, however, believed no racial justice campaign could truly succeed without addressing what he called “the giant triplets of racism, materialism, and militarism.”
  • "As of today, a familiar pattern had emerged. Small, white-dominated counties in the Plains and the Midwest were leading the way in share of households that had mailed in their Census questionnaires. Green township, Ohio, leads the nation with a 72 percent response rate. Sioux Falls city, S.D., is at 66 percent. Meanwhile, just a third of Brooklynites have replied; 26 percent in my neighborhood (really, y’all?). Cook County, which overlaps with Chicago, and Los Angeles County are both doing better at roughly 50 percent. The Census Bureau has a fun interactive map here, where you can check out response rates and drill all the way down to the neighborhood-level."
  • "The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that defendants are entitled to know that the potential consequences of a guilty plea include deportation for noncitizens, a decision that could have broader significance for the more than 12.8 million legal immigrants who live in the United States."
  • "A prominent refugee resettlement organization has enacted a policy that requires new employees to be Christian, triggering staff complaints and departures by those who see it as discrimination."
  • "Under the new system, passengers on flights from all countries could be subject to special screening before boarding if they have personal characteristics that match the latest intelligence information about potential attackers, the senior official said."
  • "Veriah died in the Ruttonjee hospital on 2 January 2000 after an epileptic seizure. The night before, she had complained to Jacques about her poor treatment, saying she was at the "bottom of the pile" because of the colour of her skin. Her words, repeated by Jacques at her inquest, struck a chord with many among Hong Kong's ethnic communities. They prompted a campaign about racism in the country and culminated in its first anti-racism laws in 2008."
  • This is an interesting interview with Alice Walker. "If I write about Palestinians being deprived of water and land, of Aung San Suu Kyi and the precious instruction she is capable of giving us—not only about democracy but also about morality—if I write about violence and war, collards and chickens, I can connect with others who care about these things. Hopefully, together we can move the discussion of survival, with grace and justice and dignity, forward. We will need to know many different kinds of things to survive as a species worth surviving."
  • "Schools are growing more segregated, not less: around 40% of black and Latino students attend schools that are between 90% and 100% nonwhite, up from around one-third in 1988 (less than one percent of white students. In 2007, a divided Supreme Court strongly curbed, but did not quite ban, programmes to integrate public schools racially (see the hyperlink on Justice Kennedy's name, above, for more). With courts no longer enforcing desegregation orders and school districts moving away from voluntary desegregation patterns, whether by race or income, patterns of residential segregation are increasingly reflected in schools."
  • "Last week Freida Pinto, star of the Oscar-winning Slumdog Millionaire, was linked to the role starring opposite Daniel Craig. She is currently starring in the new Woody Allen film You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger with Antonio Banderas, Anthony Hopkins and Naomi Watts. She has landed a new lucrative contract to be the face of L'Oreal cosmetics and is now believed to be India's highest paid film star.

    Speculation that she had been cast as the first Indian Bond girl brought a swift response from friends of India's most successful actress, former Miss World Aishwarya Rai, who told an Indian paper they believed she was being lined up for the part."

  • "Chaparro’s 150,000 “quota” is part of a larger goal he revealed as well: deporting 400,000 people in fiscal year 2010. If ICE deports that many people, the Obama administration will break its own historical record for annual deportations that it set last year."