Friday Announcements: Islam, Social Lives and Online Networking; Con or Bust; Dysfunctional Diva Project Call for Subs; Critical Mixed Race Conference Call for Papers

Islam, Social Lives and Online Networking

Pssst! Racialicious Special Correspondent and Muslimah Media Watch Editor Fatemeh Fakhraie is on this panel!

Muslims from all parts of the world since 9/11 are facing discrimination and even threats of violence. For many young people, this post-9/11 world has sparked a new, if not confusing, relationship with their own identities as Muslims. While some young men and women may not have even identified themselves strongly as Muslim before 9/11, they have found that even just their last names may now trigger their being targeted, profiled, and even discriminated against. Others, who may have always had a close relationship to Islam and Islamic practices, have been suddenly forced to defend their religion to those who brand all Muslims as terrorists. These difficult times have led young Muslims all over the world to try and find answers, connect with other individuals in similar situations, debate issues, and even subvert commonly held notions of Islam. The ability to use the media for “networking” has been significant for these youth, as many have often felt isolated and have come to find solace in these virtual communities. As one young Muslim said, “Young Muslims are resorting to this virtual world because we have no space in the actual world…’”

Networking has been significant for these youth, as many who feel isolated have come to find solace in these virtual communities, as well as a place where they establish their own presence and express themselves.

Our first event, on March 8, 2010, in this program will be a talk by Imam Suhaib Webb, a contemporary American Muslim activist and scholar. The blog that he runs under his own name suhaibwebb.com won the 2010 Brass Crescent award for, “the most indispensable, Muslim-authored blog there is. Period.”

Our second event, on March 9, 2010, in this program will be a social networking event focused on how Muslim youth use new media as a way to network with like-minded individuals, find answers to difficult questions, challenge commonly held attitudes and stereotypes about Islam, and to also discuss “taboo” topics.

The speakers at this forum represent a diverse range of perspectives and are composed of practitioners and bloggers as well as journalists and scholars.

List of speakers:

> Shahed Amanullah, CEO of altmuslim.com
> Wajahat Ali, Associate Editor of altmuslim.com, author of Goatmilk blog, playwright, and lawyer
> Fatemeh Fakhraie, Editor of Muslimah Media Watch
> Zeba Iqbal, VP of Council for American Muslim Professionals who was recently accepted as an AMCLI fellow [American Muslim Civic Leader]. Zeba Iqbal has written several pieces on Wajahat Ali’s Goatmilk blog about gender and dating in the Muslim context.
> Zeba Khan, a social media consultant and writer and founder of Muslim-Americans for Obama
> Monis Rahman, CEO of Naseeb.com
> Imam Suhaib Webb, a contemporary American Muslim activist and scholar. The blog that he runs under his own name suhaibwebb.com won the 2010 Brass Crescent award for, “the most indispensable, Muslim-authored blog there is. Period.”


This event is free, but pre-registration is required for attendance
.

Con or Bust

Con or Bust helps people of color attend WisCon and other SFF conventions that are committed to increasing racial diversity and understanding in science fiction and fantasy fandom and the field generally. It began as a response to RaceFail ’09, when people of color expressed the desire to help each other attend WisCon (a prominent feminist SFF convention). We ran an auction and took donations, and through the generosity, hard work, and good will of a lot of people, raised enough money to help nine fans of color attend WisCon (2009 final report). Subsequently, the Carl Brandon Society agreed to take over the financial management of Con or Bust, allowing it to become an ongoing project.

The Carl Brandon Society is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization, and therefore donations to Con or Bust are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law. Con or Bust is principally run by Kate Nepveu ([info]kate_nepveu), with invaluable auction assistance from [info]popelizbet.

Please feel free to send any to knepveu at steelypips dot org.

Call for Submissions, The Dysfunctional Diva Project:

African-American women are socialized to be strong, to carry the weight of our community on our back. If we can’t stop crying, if we suffer from bouts of the blues, we are often afraid to speak out about our pain for fear of backlash or ridicule.

I am searching for black- and black-identified women who suffer from anxiety, body dysmorphia, depression or bipolar disorder to share their stories in an anthology that I’m publishing. How did your family and friends respond when they learned of your condition, or did you suffer in silence? Were you ridiculed for having a “white woman’s disease,” or did you self-stigmatize? Were you reluctant to pursue treatment in the form of therapy or medication for fear of backlash or fear of being viewed as “weak”? I am particularly interested in the stories of low-income women or women without access to healthcare, and alternative methods employed to cope with mental health issues.

All stories, critical analysis and insights are welcome. If your particular neurosis wasn’t mentioned in the list above, feel free to submit anyway. Stories and essays should be no longer than 10 pages, double spaced with 1″ margins. Longer essays will be considered. Please send as an attachment to dysfunctionaldivaproject@gmail.com, and include “Black Women’s Anthology” in the subject line. Please provide a short bio (no more than 500 words) and your contact information. The submission deadline is April 21, 2010.

Thank you in advance, and I look forward to connecting with my fellow dysfunctional divas through your narratives!

have we gone crazy? I can’t hear anythin /but the maddening screams & the soft strains of death/ & you promised me/ you promised me … somebody/anybody/sing a black girl’s song/ bring her out/to know herself/to know you/but sing her rhythms/carin/struggle/hard times/sing her song of life/she’s been dead so long/closed in silence so long/she doesn’t know the sound/of her own voice/her infinite beauty/she’s half-notes scattered/without rhythm/no tune/sing her sighs/sing the song of her possibilities/sing a righteous gospel/let her be born/let her be born…

-Ntozake Shange
For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf

Call for papers: Critical Mixed Race Studies Conference at DePaul University

We invite panels, roundtables, and seminars that address the conference theme Emerging Paradigms in Critical Mixed Race Studies. Participants are also welcome to submit proposals that speak to their own specialized research, pedagogical, or community-based interests.

The primary criterion for selection will be the quality of the proposals, not its connection to the conference theme. Proposals  might consider the ways different disciplines approach or provide methodologies for critical analysis of mixed race issues.

  • The deadline for all proposals is May 1, 2010
  • Selection will be finalized by July 1, 2010

Please use the appropriate application form to make submissions for panels, roundtables or seminars. To register for the conference please use the on-line form.

The 2010 CMRS is organized by Camilla Fojas and Laura Kina (DePaul University) and Wei Ming Dariotis (San Francisco State University) and is sponsored by DePaul University Asian American Studies and Latin American and Latino Studies and co-sponsored by the College of Ethnic Studies at San Francisco State University and the MAVIN Foundation.

All queries should be directed to the conference chairs cmrs@depaul.edu or 773-325-4048

Conference website here.

Muslims from all parts of the world since 9/11 are facing discrimination and even threats of violence. For many young people, this post-9/11 world has sparked a new, if not confusing, relationship with their own identities as Muslims. While some young men and women may not have even identified themselves strongly as Muslim before 9/11, they have found that even just their last names may now trigger their being targeted, profiled, and even discriminated against. Others, who may have always had a close relationship to Islam and Islamic practices, have been suddenly forced to defend their religion to those who brand all Muslims as terrorists. These difficult times have led young Muslims all over the world to try and find answers, connect with other individuals in similar situations, debate issues, and even subvert commonly held notions of Islam. The ability to use the media for “networking” has been significant for these youth, as many have often felt isolated and have come to find solace in these virtual communities. As one young Muslim said, “Young Muslims are resorting to this virtual world because we have no space in the actual world…’”

Networking has been significant for these youth, as many who feel isolated have come to find solace in these virtual communities, as well as a place where they establish their own presence and express themselves.

Our first event, on March 8, 2010, in this program will be a talk by Imam Suhaib Webb, a contemporary American Muslim activist and scholar. The blog that he runs under his own name suhaibwebb.com  won the 2010 Brass Crescent award for, “the most indispensable, Muslim-authored blog there is. Period.”

Our second event, on March 9, 2010, in this program will be a social networking event focused on how Muslim youth use new media as a way to network with like-minded individuals, find answers to difficult questions, challenge commonly held attitudes and stereotypes about Islam, and to also discuss “taboo” topics.

The speakers at this forum represent a diverse range of perspectives and are composed of practitioners and bloggers as well as journalists and scholars.

List of speakers:

> Shahed Amanullah, CEO of altmuslim.com
> Wajahat Ali, Associate Editor of altmuslim.com, author of Goatmilk blog, playwright, and lawyer
> Fatemeh Fakhraie, Editor of Muslimah Media Watch
> Zeba Iqbal, VP of Council for American Muslim Professionals who was recently accepted as an AMCLI fellow [American Muslim Civic Leader]. Zeba Iqbal has written several pieces on Wajahat Ali’s Goatmilk blog about gender and dating in the Muslim context.
> Zeba Khan, a social media consultant and writer and founder of Muslim-Americans for Obama
> Monis Rahman, CEO of Naseeb.com
> Imam Suhaib Webb, a contemporary American Muslim activist and scholar. The blog that he runs under his own name suhaibwebb.com  won the 2010 Brass Crescent award for, “the most indispensable, Muslim-authored blog there is. Period.”

Notes
This event is free, but pre-registration is required for attendance.